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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks

We are rebuilding my sons 1967 Ford 3000 gas engine and while we have it apart want to add a block heater for easier winter starts.

On the side of the block are 2 large hex block plugs that look like a freeze plug setup where they get the sand out of the casting when they make it.

Question: The block plugs with the big hex, do they thread in or are the pressed in like automotive block plugs?

Thanks

John
 

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I would assume they thread in, Ford also used them in their NASCAR engines of that era. However, your rebuilt gasser with synthetic oil should be a very easy starter in the cold.
 

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I have never seen a hex shaped freeze plug but then there are a lot of things I have not seen. Don't know about the hex plug you are referring to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Guys

The block plugs on this engine look like this.







They appear to be a cast type of plug not like the steel pressed type in auto engines.

Instint tells me this plug looks to be threaded but I myself have never seen one like this before so thought I would ask the collective forum if someone ran into this before.

Thanks

John
 

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I gotta agree it sure looks like it should be threaded, a little gentle try turning one might be worth the effort.
 

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I was told to heat the block if something of that nature wouldn't come out without heating. Heating the fastener/plug can expand it enough to crack the cast iron, but the cast iron will tolerate heating if it isn't done too aggressively. Guess that inherent spreading of the heat is what makes cast iron dutch ovens work so well. I wonder if a man could weld a nut to the appropriate sized bolt so as to make a 'bit' to fit in an impact socket for a try? But then, I always look for the lazy way out.
 

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I believe a man should do what ever he wishes to his tractor, but I'm curious as to why you would want to heat a gasoline engine block? When I lived in IL, I used a 120 VAC oil dip stick heater. It kept the oil warm and the engine cranked over fine. But then again, I would never get on a tractor if was below zero out :) Just wondering.
 

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if you really wont to put a block heater on it you got a cupple of options that may be a lot easier then trying to get one of the big plugs out first is an in line block heater witch installs in one of the bottom rad hose the other is a circulating block heater witch i find work the best they are basically a little pump with a heater in them and as for installing one of them you would tie into the bottom rad hose somewhere or in some cases there is a plug in the water pump you can hook into and then hook that to the inlet of the block heater then attach the outlet side to the block most times you do this by removing the block drain / tap on the side below the plugs you got in question and hook it in there but if you put this style of block heater on make sure you mount it low on the tractor frame somewhere
good luck :thThumbsU
 
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