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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just traded my old Ford 851 toward a Model 1910 4wd hoping it will get around better in the snow. This is my first experience with a diesel so I have a lot to learn. So far I'm delighted with it but am still learning to start it. I'm having better luck cranking it less and running the glow plugs more. At first I thought one or more of the glow plugs was inoperative since it appeared to run on only one cylinder for a long time on starting and would die when I stopped cranking. I checked the resistance of the glow plugs and they all read the same low resistance so I ruled out bad plugs.

I have had better luck by operating the plugs more times per start, 20 seconds each time as per the manual. The best start I have done so far was at 30 degrees outside temp, cycled the glow plugs four times and got it going without running down the battery. (Improvement!) Would this be normal starting performance? My question is: as glow plugs age, do they put out less heat even though their resistance is low and they are working? Would new plugs work significantly better?

This machine has about 820 hours on it; if maintenance has been reasonable should I expect it to go 3 - 4 thousand hours before overhaul? Is oil consumption a reasonable indicator as to when overhaul is needed? Haven't put enough time on it yet to know what the oil consumption is, is some consumption normal?

Where does the Ford 1910 stand in the spectrum for durability and reliability relative to other brands? So far I get the impression from these forums that parts are available but very expensive compared to other brands; am I very likely to need them? My usage will be low and intermittent.

I'll probably have lots more questions as time goes on; hope you guys are patient, thanks a lot for your help.
 

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1981 Ford 1100 4WD
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I have an 1100, it's the smallest Shibaura diesel that Ford had in 1980. Yours is newer, probably around 1983 or 1984. The Shibaura diesels are pretty reliable.

Mine is only a 2 cylinder but has the same glow plugs. Mine is kept indoors and will start after 15 - 20 seconds on the glows, assuming the temperature is above 35F. I added a block heater to mine for temps below that. I run the block heater for 30 - 60 minutes, then hit the glows and it starts really quick, almost like summer time.
 

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I bought a 1920 this past summer. Up till now we operated a 30 acre horse ranch with antique fords (8N, 9N, 851 & 861). Our "new" ford has over 3600 hrs on a broken meter, the tires are 30% all around. That being said this tractor works rings around everything else we own.

Strong Hydraulics, easy starting in any weather and supper traction with 4WD and a locking rear axle. Cannot say enough good things about this unit. Enjoy:trink39:
 

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i have two ford 1900's one is a 1979 and the other a 1980 both are great reliable tractors and will start no matter the temp outside with the glow plugs mine are used regularly on my 26 acre hobby farm and they have never let me down would not trade them in for anything plus they are very simple to maintain and fix
 

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I find my 1900 to be a very reliable tractor, does everything I need it to do. Glowplugs are the key to cold weather starting, used properly the tractor will start regardless of the temperature. The real question is...what kind of biplane?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The biplane is a Stolp Starduster SA100 single seater, midget open cockpit biplane, similar to an early Pitts. Right now it's a project that I won't be working on for another year or so, have to finish restoration on a dune buggy first. Can't afford to own and maintain the Lycoming 150 hp engine it had, have re-engined it with a Subaru 2.2 liter Legacy engine. When ground testing is done I will have to do a complete recover and restoration on the airframe before flight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The Subaru is water cooled, no? what kind of modifications will you need to make to the airframe to accommodate the change?
I built a different, and somewhat weird, motor mount, installed a VW radiator, and scrapped the original cowling. The engine is equipped with a 2:1 cogbelt redrive unit. Biggest change is to the electric system... I'm using the factory electronic fuel injection and ignition system with modifications to include a selectable manual mixture control option and a redundant battery system. Also using dual electric fuel pumps.
 

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Well that sure sounds like an interesting conversion, are you doing the work yourself and of course, do you have some pics? Back to your original question, how have you been making out with your 1910? What is your start procedure? When cold mine goes like this--both boxes/PTO in neutral, wide open throttle, preheat glowplugs until indicator glows bright orange, crank for a bit until it catches, if it is stumbling or not firing on all four I'll turn the key quickly back to preheat until all four are firing, throttle back to med. idle and let her warm up....works every time.Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well that sure sounds like an interesting conversion, are you doing the work yourself and of course, do you have some pics? Back to your original question, how have you been making out with your 1910? What is your start procedure? When cold mine goes like this--both boxes/PTO in neutral, wide open throttle, preheat glowplugs until indicator glows bright orange, crank for a bit until it catches, if it is stumbling or not firing on all four I'll turn the key quickly back to preheat until all four are firing, throttle back to med. idle and let her warm up....works every time.Rick
Yes, doing the work myself, few people with my limited skills are dumb enough to take on such a project! Pictures follow if my dubious computer skills permit.

I'm having better luck starting the tractor now that I'm cranking less and using the glow plugs more. Running the plugs for 20 seconds as per manual yields no bright orange glow from the indicator, but I can feel the heat from it if I put my thumb over the indicator. If it doesn't start quickly when cranking, I now stop cranking and repeat the glow plug process for 25 - 30 seconds, usually starts after two or three tries with outdoor temps in the forties.

I haven't been using it much lately; I need to install some hydraulic quick-connects in the lines to the bucket tilt so I can install a cement mixer and actuate the hydraulic dump as I did on my old 851 tractor.






 

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Nice little bipe you have there, lot of work but when you get done it'll be all kinds of fun to throw around the sky. I worked on Beavers / Otters / Etc. in Alaska as an AP....was fun but not much money and tons of paperwork.....whats this about a cement mixer? How did you have that set up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice little bipe you have there, lot of work but when you get done it'll be all kinds of fun to throw around the sky. I worked on Beavers / Otters / Etc. in Alaska as an AP....was fun but not much money and tons of paperwork.....whats this about a cement mixer? How did you have that set up?
I think the Beaver is a really neat airplane, way out of my fiscal category, however! I used to own a Stearman with a 450 hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 engine, same as the Beaver... I thought it was a stupendous engine.

My Starduster is a great handling airplane... I put about 310 hours on it until the engine became dubious, it'll be great to get it flying again.

The cement mixer was a cheapo probably manufactured in China that I bought about 20 years ago for my Ford 851, but I have gotten a lot of use out of it. It attaches to the three point hitch with a drive shaft connection to the pto to rotate the drum and a cylinder for the upper link of the pto to dump it. It came with a one way hydraulic cylinder and utilized gravity to dump and hydraulics to bring it back up. I was told I needed something called an implement valve to install on the tractor to run the cylinder. They said that it would cost about $120 for the valve. Always being on the bottom of the financial stratus for whatever projects I do, instead of buying the valve I drilled a hole on the other end of the dump cylinder welded a fitting to it and attached a hose to make it a two way cylinder, hydraulic power both ways. Then I got a couple of hydraulic quick-connects and installed them in the bucket tilt lines of the loader on the tractor. I could then operate the dump function by moving the bucket tilt control. The bucket always stayed not tilted, but I could still lift and lower the bucket with that setup and it was quick and easy to switch from normal to mixer use and back again.

I did have to shorten the driveshaft for it to fit the 851, hoping the shortened shaft will work on the 1910 and I won't have to buy a new one. I've got the quick-connects and fittings, will install soon and then find out about the driveshaft. I had the cement company deliver several yards of sand gravel mix so all I would have to do is shovel the sand gravel and the cement into the drum, carry a five gallon jug of water in the bucket, drive to where I needed the cement, and pour the water in on site, it worked pretty well. (I put up 6600 feet of fence on my 80 acres using steel driven posts with 4X4 wood posts about every two or three hundred feet and at corners.)

This tractor is too pretty to leave out in the weather and I figured if I parked it in the hangar, every time I started it, it would take two weeks to air out the hangar from the smoke, so I'm going to build a tractor shed leanto on one of the hangars; need to plant three posts in cement for that, hence the urge to get the mixer working on the new tractor.
 

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Yeah anything with a round engine is right up my alley, love the sound of a radial and the Beaver is far and away my favorite aircraft, I was able to spend quite a bit of time flying them on floats and tundra tires...what a great plane.
So if I'm understanding your setup, you are using the buckets hyd. circuit to run the tilt cylinder on the three point hitch mounted mixer. This may be asking the obvious, but don't you have a SCV at the rear of the tractor that you could use to run this cylinder?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yeah anything with a round engine is right up my alley, love the sound of a radial and the Beaver is far and away my favorite aircraft, I was able to spend quite a bit of time flying them on floats and tundra tires...what a great plane.
So if I'm understanding your setup, you are using the buckets hyd. circuit to run the tilt cylinder on the three point hitch mounted mixer. This may be asking the obvious, but don't you have a SCV at the rear of the tractor that you could use to run this cylinder?
Well, maybe, but I have no idea what an SCV is, perhaps you could enlighten me? My only experience is what I had with the 851 and I'm just replicating what I did that worked with it.
 

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SCV's are just the fancy name for a pair of hydraulic ports, usually at the rear of the tractor, controlled by a valve. On my 1900 the control for the valve is just under the seat on the right if you are sitting on the tractor. Does your tractor have a loader and if so where is it plumbed into? Should be somewhere near where the SCV valve is...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
SCV's are just the fancy name for a pair of hydraulic ports, usually at the rear of the tractor, controlled by a valve. On my 1900 the control for the valve is just under the seat on the right if you are sitting on the tractor. Does your tractor have a loader and if so where is it plumbed into? Should be somewhere near where the SCV valve is...
My tractor has a loader and it is plumbed in at the rear of the engine compartment ahead of the driver on the right. Apparently SVC's were not standard as I've seen some tractors advertised for sale as not having an SVC. I believe mine does not. It does have a hydraulic port on the back controlled by the lift lever moving into a notch at the top of the travel. The manual cautions not to put the lever into the notch when you're raising the lift. Looks like you lose controlling the lift if you're going to use the rear port and lever notch. I think I'll proceed with original plan as it worked so well on the 851.
 

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So your tractor is not equipped with rear remotes, have you given any thought to installing a set? Not terribly expensive and then you would be able to operate a wide variety of implements, your mixer included, and still retain the full functionality of your loader. I'm just thinking that if you are going to go through the effort and expense to make your mixer work it might be worth investigating.....I believe you are talking about the three point lift control lever that if put all the way back to the detent, the SCV/remote would be operated by its own lever...Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So your tractor is not equipped with rear remotes, have you given any thought to installing a set? Not terribly expensive and then you would be able to operate a wide variety of implements, your mixer included, and still retain the full functionality of your loader. I'm just thinking that if you are going to go through the effort and expense to make your mixer work it might be worth investigating.....I believe you are talking about the three point lift control lever that if put all the way back to the detent, the SCV/remote would be operated by its own lever...Rick
I've already spent the just under fifty bucks for the two quick-connects... won't need to spend any more to get the mixer operational. When the mixer is operating, I will still be able to lift and lower the loader, have never needed the tilt function when using the mixer in the past. I don't foresee a need for any other implements in the future so will probably just continue on course. (Now watch me fall in lust with another must-have implement a week after I've got the mixer going!)
 
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