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I have a 1985 Ford 1710. Its not an off-set tractor. The clutch has seen its day. Its starting to slip and burn. I know I have to split the halves to get at it. I have done cars but I have never done a clutch on a tractor. So are there any good tips I should know befor I attempt this? I have all the jacks and an 8,000 Lbs break apart roll away lift.:howdy:
 

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I've just pulled my 1700 apart to replace the clutch. So far it's relatively simple, but quite a bit of work to do alone, on dirt, and with a flat tire. I haven't been able to attempt reassembly. That will be the tough part. Do it on smooth concrete, or lay a sheet of plywood down so the jack rolls easily.

Make sure to unhook everything first: Wiring, throttle linkage, hydraulic lines for the 3 point (and loader, if applicable), steering linkage, front drive shaft if applicable, etc. I drove wooden wedges into the gaps between the front axle and frame, so it doesn't wobble.

I haven't found anything except the flywheel nut that requires unusual tools. I think 13, 15, 17 and 19mm sockets and end wrenches did everything except the wire from the alternator; the flywheel nut is much bigger; I haven't tried to pull that off yet since it's been raining here. I'll have to buy a correct socket for the flywheel nut, or rent one.

I'm certainly not an expert, since this is the first split I've done by myself (and the other one I was about 11 years old, and in the way more than helping, if you know what I mean) and I don't even have a manual yet.

With the split done and clutch components removed, I'm 2 1/2 hours into the job, which included removing the loader. I estimate it will take twice that long or more to put it back together; I could be way off base.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've just pulled my 1700 apart to replace the clutch. So far it's relatively simple, but quite a bit of work to do alone, on dirt, and with a flat tire. I haven't been able to attempt reassembly. That will be the tough part. Do it on smooth concrete, or lay a sheet of plywood down so the jack rolls easily.

Make sure to unhook everything first: Wiring, throttle linkage, hydraulic lines for the 3 point (and loader, if applicable), steering linkage, front drive shaft if applicable, etc. I drove wooden wedges into the gaps between the front axle and frame, so it doesn't wobble.

I haven't found anything except the flywheel nut that requires unusual tools. I think 13, 15, 17 and 19mm sockets and end wrenches did everything except the wire from the alternator; the flywheel nut is much bigger; I haven't tried to pull that off yet since it's been raining here. I'll have to buy a correct socket for the flywheel nut, or rent one.

I'm certainly not an expert, since this is the first split I've done by myself (and the other one I was about 11 years old, and in the way more than helping, if you know what I mean) and I don't even have a manual yet.

With the split done and clutch components removed, I'm 2 1/2 hours into the job, which included removing the loader. I estimate it will take twice that long or more to put it back together; I could be way off base.
Thanks for your input. I have a concrete floor and a garage to work in. Plus a full service manual. I have not read the manual yet. I was hoping to leave the loader on but now I know it has to come off. If my flywheel is smooth and not concave, or convex I'll leave it on and just change the friction plate. But I don't think I'm going to be that lucky. And I hope the pressure plate springs are all good. But again, might not be that lucky. One thing I have always done on clutch changes is replace the throw out bearing. Made that mistake one time not chaging one and had to pull it all apart again in 100 miles. (1971 Jeepster). looks like I got a few weeks work ahead. I don't know what clutch is in there. Ive read there are 2 types. So I can't even order one till its all apart. Thanks again and good luck with yours.
 

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I got mine back together this morning, but haven't yet tried it out. It will work though.

If you can see in the side port on the transmission housing (behind the rubber cover, kind of blocked by the loader bracket, if yours is like mine) and take a picture to post, we may be able to figure out if yours is a dual-disk clutch or not.

You may also be able to test it by engaging the PTO (with the engine off) and putting the tractor in gear. With a helper, partly disengage the clutch, and then try to push the tractor in gear. If it rolls, hold the same position on the clutch, and try to spin the PTO shaft backward. If it doesn't move, try fully depressing the clutch; it should then turn. If the clutch has to be fully down to roll or disengage the PTO, then it's a single disk clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I got mine back together this morning, but haven't yet tried it out. It will work though.

If you can see in the side port on the transmission housing (behind the rubber cover, kind of blocked by the loader bracket, if yours is like mine) and take a picture to post, we may be able to figure out if yours is a dual-disk clutch or not.

You may also be able to test it by engaging the PTO (with the engine off) and putting the tractor in gear. With a helper, partly disengage the clutch, and then try to push the tractor in gear. If it rolls, hold the same position on the clutch, and try to spin the PTO shaft backward. If it doesn't move, try fully depressing the clutch; it should then turn. If the clutch has to be fully down to roll or disengage the PTO, then it's a single disk clutch.
As soon as I get a nice day I'll try to do what you said and see if I can take a picture. My PTO always slammed in hard. I don't know if that means anything. And it might just be how the clutch is working being worn out. :thanku:
 
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