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I have a EX3200 with 15-19.5 rear tires. Which calls for 29 gallons of rim guard or 310lbs per tire. That seems low to me. My JD 425 has 25" rear tires and i put 12 gallons of window washer fluid in each tire easily. basically 2/3 full.

Anybody have any experience on this? Just thinking it would be nice to have more wight on the rear end. Currently chained up and plowing snow it my 7 ft blade on my 3pt, and its pulling me side ways, which gets sketchy on a hill side.
 

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I dont think from experience rear tire weight is going to keep the front tires in place. For that it will need some front end weight.
 

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I agree, maybe some rimguard in the front tires along with some front wheel weights if they are available for your wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
its the rear of the tractor sliding over, with the 3pt and 7ft blade.
 

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What design of chains are you using now? Just cross chains are going to want to slide sideways easier than the diamond pattern ones. As for filling, I would put as much in as they will take, but what do I know?....lol

 

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Discussion Starter #6
4 link straight chains. Im set on adding weight, no doubt differnt chains could help. but regardless my tractor has a loader and is light in the rear end.
 

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Back to your original question. Rimguard, or any liquid ballast should be filled so that it is just above the top of the rim on the inside of the tire so that there is still a good sized air gap at the top. If not then you may as well fill it completely as the air pressure is not going to do much in the way of allowing the tires to be shock absorbers, which they are designed to do on tractors that have no real suspension of their own.
 

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Firestone’s ballast chart says 34 gallons. I found a thread where someone claims they put over 35 gallons in a 15-19.5 tire. If the tires are in good condition, I would have no problem putting the valve stem at 12:00 and filling liquid to the top of the rim. It would put you above the recommended 75% fill rate. (Liquid vs air) I think the fill rate charts have a high safety factor built in, due to the knowledge that not everyone is going to be filling new tires.
 

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We'll pump liquid till it won't pump, close the valve and call it good usually. They have to be 80-90% full at that point. But we have a calcium pump, mainly used for windshield washer fluid these days given that tubes are garbage these days.
 

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I have a EX3200 with 15-19.5 rear tires. Which calls for 29 gallons of rim guard or 310lbs per tire. That seems low to me. My JD 425 has 25" rear tires and i put 12 gallons of window washer fluid in each tire easily. basically 2/3 full.

Anybody have any experience on this? Just thinking it would be nice to have more wight on the rear end. Currently chained up and plowing snow it my 7 ft blade on my 3pt, and its pulling me side ways, which gets sketchy on a hill side.
Note that you are only filling the tire and the reduced rim diameter needed to install the tire. It's basically a doughnut with a cross section consisting of the width of the tire and the depth from tread to the inner diameter of the rim.

Without crunching numbers, a 29 gallon fill for the larger tire sounds about right to me. Note that Rim Guard's chart does have at least one discrepancy that I have noted in that a 75%fill of a 26x12-12 tire is actually 13 gallons as opposed to the 8.3 gallons listed.

A reason for the maximum 75% fill suggested, besides the difficulty of installing more liquid, is that sudden impacts, such as driving over a bump at speed, will spike the pressure in the air chamber to higher pressures as the air chamber becomes smaller and less able to absorb the deformation of the tread. A high enough pressure spike can result in a blowout, especially as the tire gets older and less flexible.

As noted by poncho62 above, diamond pattern chains will help handle the lateral load imposed by the back blade at an angle, as will 2-link chains over the existing 4-link chains. The number of links trapped between the ground and the tread are what is important. Each link so trapped improves lateral stability.

The option is a narrower back blade, or a reduced angle of back blade usage, neither of which may be acceptable for your requirements. That leaves different chains as the best option for added weight and better lateral stability. The 2-link chains will probably be quite a bit heavier than the diamond pattern.
 

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Keep in mind rim gaurd is alot heavier than washer fluid. I'm thinking rim gaurd is around 11lbs per gallon where washer fluid is around 8lbs per gallon. Washer fluid is cheaper but if you absolutely want all the weight you can get I'd go with actual rim guard.

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I've always gone on the theory that fluid should be to top of the rim standing up which is about 2/3rds full. This allows sufficient air to allow some compression over uneven surfaces.
 

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A 75% fill level is about an inch or so above the outside of the rim. Under high humidity conditions, the fill line is visible on the side of the tire in the cool of early morning either as a dew line or a frost line. ie. That part of the tire holding liquid will be frost or dew covered and the air chamber will be free of moisture.
 
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