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Discussion Starter #1
I've been using Fluid Film for several years on my truck to keep the rust from coming back as best as I can. It seems to do a fairly good job. For those who don't know, Fluid Film is a lanolin (sheep's wax) based, non-toxic, non drying, gel like rust inhibitor and lubricant. It is largely used as an undercoating on vehicles.

Ever since I began plowing snow with my tractor a few years ago, I've notice the rust has accelerated and I've even replaced the fender pan and done a fair amount of repainting to keep up with it. I don't know how much longer this machine is going to last me or how long I will keep it before I upgrade to something bigger but I'd hate to lose it to rust and I'd like to protect my investment as best I can.

I think it would be wise to undercoat it especially around the foot rest area and the back of the frame where there is no oily engine parts to prevent any rust.

In the spring I would probably have to pressure wash the fluid film off because the dust and dirt kicked up by the deck would make a real mess underneath.

I'm curious if anyone else has used fluid film on their tractor and how it has worked in lawn and garden tractor applications.
 

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I’ve started putting it under lawnboys but I haven’t used any that I’ve coated yet. I too am curious to hear if anybody has had any luck with it.
 

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I haven't found anything that lasts a significant amount of time under a mowing deck (fluid film, honey goo, wd40, graphite spray, paint. POR15 might last some time, but I would expect even it will get cut up by debris, and then peeled off when scraping the deck clean of built up grass.

I have noticed bits on my snow equipment rusted heavily last year, likely due to being hit by road spray containing calcium chloride. Most of it is around & on the engines, so it's not great to spray flammable stuff on those areas. Thankfully, they decided to stop using it this year...
 

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If you want a solution that holds, first strip as much of the rust off as you can, then paint with a zinc cold galvanizing paint. Then POR-15 black topcoat. Bulletproof.
 

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It would probably be ok but tractors tend to get slimed up enough with grease and oil as it is . You might have a problem knowing when there's actually a starting of a leak.
 

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I use FF on my truck and then started using it on my plow, four wheeler and snow blower. Has prevented any more rust and pretty much stoped rust where there had been some. Working better than when I tried painting, especially in crevices and joints. Can't help with the problem of grass sticking as this stuff, except for ATV, obviously don't get involved during mowing season.
MikeC
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't think it would do very well under a mower deck, I think it would either make the grass stick, and/or come off very quickly. I've used POR-15 before. I've not been impressed. It requires a lot of prep work to perform as advertised and it doesn't hold up to UV. Not to mention it's ungodly price tag. Also it doesn't just wipe off like Fluim Film does.

4Get GTO, it does make it more difficult to trace leaks, that is a downside of it. Fortunately it isn't permanent. It wipes off with a rag and a pressure washer will usually get most of it off.
 

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While I don't have any experience with the Fluid Film, I do use a product called CRC Rust Converter on metal that is outside. Here in northern Florida, we get 60 inches of rain a year and also high humidity. I have a table outside where the top is a sheet of 5 feet X 3 feet X ¼ inch steel (I got it used). I did sand the top to remove most of the severe corrosion to even the surface out, then applied the CRC Rust Converter. After a week, I applied another coat to the top surface. This outside table gets used for all my assembly work, teardown of things and gets scratched up quite a bit. In the year plus of being exposed to rain and sun, there is zero rust on the surface. Used it today to cut up the rest of the plum tree that I took from a neighbor's yard. I use the CRC Rust Converter on the JD lawn tractor where the paint has peeled from the rust underneath before repainting and it hasn't peeled off yet.
 

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I've been snowblowing and mowing with my Conquest for 16 years with virtually no rust on the tractor and the deck is in good shape for not doing much to it other than occasionally scraping clippings from the underside. The blower has some rust in several spots, mostly weld points, but it's not too bad. The last 2 years I've started to put FF on all rust spots and chute gears, and from what I can see the rust hasn't progressed.

I've been using FF on the underside of my Jeep Wrangler (a heavy coating every Fall) since buying it new in 2013 and there is virtually no rust on it. I love FF and it seems to do a great job. As previously mentioned it's hard to identify leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah it makes just about any undercarriage work messy but it seems to do an excellent job at inhibiting rust.
 

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FF is good product, even now with Turtle Wax making it but not as good as original. Original FF is 3 parts Lanolin, 3 parts mineral oil and 7 parts mineral spirits. Problem is it's a mixture, and must be agitated as used or the Lanolin falls out of the mix. Lanolin won't dissolve. As the mineral spirits evaporate off pretty much all flow into cracks is done and the Lanolin bridges the crack like heavy paint.

There are superior products, but they don't have the packaging or advertising FF has.

POR 15 products are FRAUD. The product is merely elastomeric marine coating designed for temporary coating in salt water environment with a tiny amount of Phosphoric Acid added. Phosphoric requires wetted time to wick into and beyond rust to create an Iron Phosphate layer, and POR product drys before that wetting can occur. Since the POR product has only adhesed to the top of the rust, it will and does spall off over a short time.
 

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Well, POR15 seems to have worked reasonably well for me. I coated both my trucks driver's side floor (on the inside, it was rusting out due to a water leak) and the transmission crossmember (as it was super-rusted), and both show no signs of the POR15 coming off, and it's been just over 3 years since they were done...

Perhaps you didn't do good prep when you used it, or it was on a part that is exposed to the sun and you didn't paint over the POR15?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
FF is good product, even now with Turtle Wax making it but not as good as original. Original FF is 3 parts Lanolin, 3 parts mineral oil and 7 parts mineral spirits. Problem is it's a mixture, and must be agitated as used or the Lanolin falls out of the mix. Lanolin won't dissolve. As the mineral spirits evaporate off pretty much all flow into cracks is done and the Lanolin bridges the crack like heavy paint.

There are superior products, but they don't have the packaging or advertising FF has.

POR 15 products are FRAUD. The product is merely elastomeric marine coating designed for temporary coating in salt water environment with a tiny amount of Phosphoric Acid added. Phosphoric requires wetted time to wick into and beyond rust to create an Iron Phosphate layer, and POR product drys before that wetting can occur. Since the POR product has only adhesed to the top of the rust, it will and does spall off over a short time.

I have a few questions-

1. How long has Turtle Wax been making Fluid Film? I had never heard this and couldn't find any information on it.

2. Fluid Film is advertised as containing no solvents, so it shouldn't contain mineral spirits. I've had it on the bottom of my truck for several years and it is still very much a liquid, not dried or cracked anywhere. Do you have something to verify that it actually does contain mineral spirits?

3. Fluid Film is also advertised as being non-toxic and mineral spirits are obviously toxic. Are you sure it contains mineral spirits?

I'm not saying you are wrong, I've just never heard this before.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Okay I looked into this a little bit. Fluid Film is manufactured by Eureka Chemical Company which is a privately held company and has no association with Turtle Wax or Turtle Wax brands.

Also it does not contain mineral spirits according to the MSDS. The MSDS states-

CONTAINS NO SOLVENTS, SILICONES, TEFLON OR KNOWN CARCINOGENS.

Hazardous components: CAS No.
Petroleum Oil mist 64742-57-7
 

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Well the guy above you said otherwise, and it's posted on the internet so it must be true.

But wait, what you posted is on the internet too.

How can they both be right?????

😁😇😁😇😁😇
 

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What do you think Refined petroleum oil, hydrotreated heavy paraffinic is?

How about Calcium petroleum sulfonate?
Those are the only ingredients in the current FF product, Lanolin has been removed according to the FF MSDS as of 2015.

Oddly I don't see the original FF Lanolin on that sheet.

Eureeka was sold as an entity back 10 or more years, plenty of discussion about the sale on ShopFloorTalk at the time. It continues to fly as an "independent" Corp entity and a "Female owned business" as a sales tool.

When you buy it by the trailer load, in barrels, you get the real contents recipe. FF has chosen to become a retail company and lost many trailer load customers.
 

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I did a bit of reading on this today. Fluid Film is listed as being lanolin however their msds says something like 80% parraffinic petroleum.

I couldn't find any discussion on lanolin being removed from it. I honestly don't know what to think.
 
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