My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My good ol' 1997 27" RCA CRT TV crapped out yesterday, the dreaded (but interesting) vertical colored line. So I got out the 3 year old 25" LCD Crosley I brought back from my parents house...

Last time I tried it it wouldn't fill the screen area so I went back to CRT. It has 4 modes, "normal", "zoom", "wide", and "cinema" and none of 'em work to my liking. Normal looks nicely proportional and is sharp as a tack, but is black 3" on each side of the picture and top and bottom. The other three modes either squash or stretch the picture or it only shows part of the picture and the rest is off the screen.

I called T-W and the "lady" said to set the DVR/Cable box to "1080 something" so I did. Same woeful picture...

Are they all like this, even the 5 footers up on the wall? What are those other proportion "modes" for if they don't give a full picture or distort people into squashed faced gremlins? I was going to spring for a 40something inch for the living room but I'm now waiting until I know how to get a full screen of normal proportions.
 

·
Machinery enthusiast
Joined
·
4,257 Posts
HH, do you have HD service? When you changed the cablebox to 1080i, was it previously set to 720p or native?
I had a similar problem when I got my new Mits HD TV. Regular resolution broadcasts looked terrible and differing channels gave me differeing screen sizes.
I now have it fine tuned pretty well and the changes weren't too painful :D Actually I was able to lower my monthly cable charge by around $20 and get better service :D

I changed my comcast service over to HD which meant I had to upgrade the box too. At 1st I too changed the box to send 1080i signals to the TV but later changed it back to "native". This way I get 720p broadcasts delivered in 720p (mainly sportscasts) and 1080i delivered in 1080i. From what I've learned our nekkid eyes can't really tell the diff between 1080i & 720p unless the scenes are fast moving (720p) or 3D (720p).
1080p is blue ray quality resolution but no one broadcasts in it just yet, so we get either 1080i or 720p.

In "native" setting all the pics are better IMHO. I can press "info" on the remote and the TV will tell me what resolution it's recieveing from the cablebox.
In most cases my screen is full width with the proper resolutions but there are certain shows, commercials and movies that give me the letterbox picture and I've come to the conclusion it's due to the transmitted signal.
If the cable box and TV are capable of HDMI I'd recommend to use HDMI over all the other inputs (coax, component or composite). HDMI gives the full bandwidth plus can carry all the popular audio formats too (stereo, 5.1 & 7.1). You definitely want to use HDMI if you have a bluray player connected.
If this makes any sense, good. If not, well, atleast it was free :D
Good luck
Dave
 

·
Tractor Nut
Joined
·
550 Posts
Harold,

Use your Time Warner Cable remote and press the "#" button to cycle through different display settings available from your cable box. Every time you press it, it will go to a different setting, such as Normal, Zoom, or Stretch. You may need to find the right combination of these settings along with the settings on your TV that you were changing previously.

If you need further help after this, also let us know what model set top box you have from TWC and if possible your remote control model. TWC uses different remote manufacturers and models in different areas, but you may find your model on http://www.urcsupport.com/index.php?mso_id=144

Also, let us know what type of cable you have connecting your cable box to your TV. Coax, Composite (Yellow, White, Red), Component (Red, Green, Blue, White, Red), DVI (single cable that requires separate audio cable), or HDMI (single cable).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Gonna head right out there and punch some buttons... now that the Yankees are over and Wifey went to bed, "Don't mess with that TV NOW, the ball game is coming on!" Thanks guys, I'll report back... I do have a brick out on the porch if all else fails!:D
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,831 Posts
Also note that in order to get HD from the box into the TV you need to use either HDMI or component. Coax Ch 3 or 4 and Composite will only give you standard definition (no true wide screen operation even when tuned to an HD channel broadcasting a program filmed in widescreen).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Tried every combination of TV and cable box settings last night and no change. In fact, the 4 box/TV modes are unaffected by each other. I'll try using a different hookup, the 3 wire color coded one, it's now on a regular co-ax screw in cable...

It scares me that I know more about computers than I do TV's...:D
 

·
Tractor Nut
Joined
·
550 Posts
Here's another thought Harold.... not knowing what model cable box you have and the fact that you had it hooked up to an older TV before.... your cable box might not even be HD capable.

If you don't make any progress with this, I'd call TWC again and request a service call. TWC service calls are usually free, and although I don't know about your area specifically, I'd be willing to be that they are just because of the competition between TWC and Verizon.

You can usually upgrade to an HD box at no added cost too. Most HDs are "free".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
Any content you receive that is broadcast in Standard Definition is going to have an aspect ratio of 4:3. Your Crosley TV has an aspect ratio of 16:9. Using the "Stretch" feature via your TV or Cable box is going to distort the picture (make people look fat). If indeed you are getting your content in 4:3, then your only option to fill your TV screen is to use the "Stretch" setting or use the "Zoom" options on your TV or Cable box. Using the latter will some times cut things off such sports scores, stock tickers, etc., but will not distort the picture like the Stretch setting will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
OK...

It IS a Hidef box/DVR as it has options for the hidef adjustments.

I reset the aspect ratios of both the TV and box back and forth and reversed, more combinations than a deck of cards!:D No joy.

I think T/W will get the call now as I don't feel like spinning the box and TV around again for another wire cross check. If I don't have the right hookup wires, they will... Some things I just can't figger out any more.

More as news breaks.:D Thanks all!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
1. Make sure you are receiving a Hi-Definition signal from TW. If so then:

2. You will have to use a HDMI cable or Component cables. The HDMI will handle both Audio and Video. The Component cables will handle just the Video, so you will need Red/White RCA cables (for sound) in addition to the Red/Blue/Green cables.


HDMI


Composite


For Sound



The other 3 kinds of cables are COAX, Composite (Yellow for Video + Red/White for Audio), and S-Video (does Video only). These cables will work on an HD signal, but you won't get the correct aspect ratio, nor will you get the full resolution of the HD signal.

I realize this has all been said before, but I am just trying to summarize it a bit. Not sure if I did. :drunkie:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
A foot note: If you don't have the cables mentioned above, order them from someplace like monoprice.com. Oh, and if you are ordering a HDMI cable make sure your Crosley TV has an HDMI input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
HH, you need to stop obsessing about trying to fill the screen and not distort or crop the picture. Just go out and buy a bigger screen and learn to live with the fact that you cannot always fill the screen.

I really don't understand why some people cannot grasp that if a picture doesn't fit the format, there is nothing that can be done to make it fit without cropping or distorting. The problem is not just the 4:3 versus 16:9 but that content is being manipulated to fit (letterbox) one into the other so regardless of what mode you choose, the content can vary.

Get a TV with a black bezel and watch it in a dark room. That way you won't notice the black bands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
HH, you need to stop obsessing about trying to fill the screen and not distort or crop the picture. Just go out and buy a bigger screen and learn to live with the fact that you cannot always fill the screen.

I really don't understand why some people cannot grasp that if a picture doesn't fit the format, there is nothing that can be done to make it fit without cropping or distorting. The problem is not just the 4:3 versus 16:9 but that content is being manipulated to fit (letterbox) one into the other so regardless of what mode you choose, the content can vary.

Get a TV with a black bezel and watch it in a dark room. That way you won't notice the black bands.
Yes, not everything is broadcast in HD even though it is riding the HD pipe. But still, I think it would be worth it to spend 5 bucks if HH is indeed getting HD content through his provider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
Ja, when I replaced my old CRT TV with a HD LCD TV, I also upgraded my Shaw Direct dish and receiver. It cost me a bit more than $100 but it was a one time cost and I get most of the available content in HD that I was subscribed to in SD for no additional monthly fee.

I think what gets confusing for some is the mixed content. 16:9 is being emulated using letterbox format onto SD 4:3 and as you say, not all content is in 16:9 even when the provider's signal is HD.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,831 Posts
Seems like as far as my customers 40% can't stand the black boxes and claim after watching for awhile you don't notice the distortion from stretching. The other 40% can't stand to look at the stretching and want the boxes on a 4:3 signal.

The other 20% (mostly seniors) wish their TV still had a wood grain cabinet to match their furniture and a remote with only power, volume, and channel buttons. :fing32:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,508 Posts
That has been my experience, too, Mark. If they have a big screen TV and are unhappy with the SD picture, I usually try to upsell them to HD. I receive only off air broadcasts (no satellite, cable, or IPTV), and the channels that do broadcast in HD look fantastic on my my 55" LCD. I usually can't tell a difference btw 720 and 1080, either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
Seems like as far as my customers 40% can't stand the black boxes and claim after watching for awhile you don't notice the distortion from stretching. The other 40% can't stand to look at the stretching and want the boxes on a 4:3 signal.

The other 20% (mostly seniors) wish their TV still had a wood grain cabinet to match their furniture and a remote with only power, volume, and channel buttons. :fing32:
The old addage "you can't please everyone" comes to mind. I liked those first generation remotes that didn't use batteries. They just struck notes on tuning fork-like keys.

OTA television is making a comeback what with it all going digital. My neighbor cancelled his dish service and upgraded his old UHF antenna. For OTA, I would need to put up a 70 foot tower to get above all the tall trees or go to town with a chainsaw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
"The old addage "you can't please everyone" comes to mind."

I won't be pleased until the aspect ratio uses the entire screen for normal looking scenes. If I have to fool around with the 4 different settings on the button, fine, but I want the entire picture. I just watched "Monte Walsh" (Lee Marvin '70 version) in "letterbox" on my other CRT and it WAS ALL THERE. I don't mind the black borders top and bottom, it's the unnecessary distortion of the picture I object to. It's like paying for something you ain't getting... Like a cars that can't come near the sticker MPG's.:D

T/W will be on the line tomorrow IF they have any staff working this "holiday" and I'll get THE MAN out here for a lesson in Neuvo Television! Wow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Mostly Final Update:

T/W guy came this morning. There is no way any of the infomation that Wifey got from the phone rep last week was correct! First off, to receive any HD programming at all... you have to have the channels operating from the "700's" and up. The transmissions are not HD in the lower channels, the channel #'s remain the same in HD except they start with a "7". Simple enough!

He rewired the box/TV hookups, checked the "ground block", did some juju magic up on the pole and then came in and explained all the features of "HD-TV" to us. I've not had the time to really get "up close and personal" with the picture for any length of time, but it's now filling the screen properly and when it's not it shows a logo in the borders to tell you it's not broadcast in HD.

My DVD in the den is not an HD set so it's a trip into the T-W office to swap it out and then find a suitable new TV for my TCM "Olden Days" movies and History Channel programming. All in all it was well worth the $40 service call as the phone rep wasn't even in the ball park with info and this tech's explanations were easy to follow.

Thanks to all for your help!!!!:)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,831 Posts
... First off, to receive any HD programming at all... you have to have the channels operating from the "700's" and up. The transmissions are not HD in the lower channels, the channel #'s remain the same in HD except they start with a "7". Simple enough!...
I wondered how that worked in different locations. Here on TW it's 1000+. Old channel 10 in HD is 1010 for example. But there are some mysterious exceptions to the number scheme. With a new TV you can get the local off air channels in HD on cable without the box. Channel 10 is the analog, 10.1 or 10-1 is the HD version without the box for example.

To think now how we used to be happy with all three CBS,NBC, and ABC coming in B&W using the twisty knob. :D
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top