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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I been working on the 1952 Ridemaster I save out of the junk yard last year off and on to get it ready for the local tractor show by me.

I was pulling the rear tires and rims off to paint and replace the wheel bearings when I notice that the tires were loaded with calcium :banghead3 and the rims were real rusty behind the wheel weights and around the valve stem.

So this what I found when I got the tires off. This is one reason I hate loaded tires.
The pics are after I cut the centers out that is why the rims are cut in half.

Rim#1



Rim #2



So I Cut the centers out on the brake lathe at my dad’s auto repair and ordered a new set of rims to put the centers into.

Here one center cut out of the old rims.



Also here's the center cut out of the new rims.





This is the center out of the old rim sitting in there new home.



With a lot of care to make shore the centers were in the new rims strait they were welded into the new rims.





I will post more pics when I get them painted and put back on the Ridemaster.
 

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Looks good:thThumbsU

Jason
 

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I also stay clear of filling the tires. Thats a pretty decent job to tackle. Proably was a bit of a pain getting the rim straight.

Just a tip; I'd turn up the heat on your welds a tad. The sides of the weld should flow into the material a bit more.

good job :fing32:
 

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Did my rims the same way and don't know why any one would load the tires on a Ridemaster with all that cast iron and a driver on it.
Ron
 

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That's a nice job, Jerome.
I noticed that you thought ahead enough to mark the location of the valve stem for the new rims.


I would like to offer a welding tip also. ...
I noticed that you flow your weld in a straight line ( as most people do ).
This gives you a narrow ( colder ) weld that beads up more.

I've learned to swing the gun back and forth a little as I weld down the seam.
That widens the weld out and allows the the wire to spend more time in the area as it moves along.
It will give you more heat penetration and flatter bead flow at the same settings then just running a straight line.

It takes some time and practices to get use to swinging the gun, but once you get use to it, your weld strength and looks will greatly improve.
When you get the knack of it, you can turn up the heat and the feed and really burn in some welds.
When welding thicker steel, I'll lay a second, wider weld over the first.

Go back and look at the welds on my tractor and you will see that even the welds on a small bracket are wider and flatter.
Don't get discouraged, it takes time and practices to learn to swing weld but it sure pays off in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice job!!

So how did you use the brake lathe?? Did it have weld beads on the inside edge like you welded the new one together that you just cut off??
The old rims were spot welded together; I cut the rims from the out side till the centers came out.

The new rims were welded with a bead like you see in the last 2 pics.
I put the cutter inside the rim and cut the beads till the center came out.

Thanks guys for the welding tip will do next time.
I was also not the guy who welded them the old man did them well I was at work. I am happy he did them instead of me they would of looked real bad.
They will look a lot better after I hit them with a grinder.
 

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Good save there Jerome.
 

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Great work! I really like to see stuff reworked rather than tossed and replaced. Perhaps you could have found a set of Ridemaster rims, but overall I think you will enjoy rebuilding them much more.

Can't wait to see the Ridemaster when it is almost restored. (Do we ever really finish restoring stuff? There is that one more bit to be done.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great work! I really like to see stuff reworked rather than tossed and replaced. Perhaps you could have found a set of Ridemaster rims, but overall I think you will enjoy rebuilding them much more.

Can't wait to see the Ridemaster when it is almost restored. (Do we ever really finish restoring stuff? There is that one more bit to be done.)
I do have another set of rims but they go to my other Ridemaster.

Finding another set would of taken years I think.
 

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According to my Ridemaster manual, the rear rims were "liquid filled" from the factory. I have to asume that they used calcium chloride because that was what everyone did back then. It was probably an effort by Bolens to help make the unit a little more stable.
 

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I do have another set of rims but they go to my other Ridemaster.

Finding another set would of taken years I think.
I have an old mid 60's Sears Custom-6 garden tractor and the centers on the rear wheels are exactly like the centers on the Ridemaster wheels.

I haven't checked the actual rim width but they look to be the same width.
I'm sure these same wheels were used on other garden tractors in the 50's and 60's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What was the donor for the rims you got? How much alike are they to the RideMaster rims?
My dads has a Auto Repair so he can about get any size rim around.

I say the rims are about a 9 out of 10 like the old ones.
 

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You really did a good job on those rims, Jerome.
They look excellent.
 
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