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Firewood Processing

321382 Views 5441 Replies 125 Participants Last post by  mikeinri
I have my videos of timber work scattered over half a dozen or more of these threads. This time I decided to start a thread, and add to it as I take more. Feel free to add your own pictures or video, this is not my thread, just one I started for sharing.

This morning I took down this 18" Red Oak that died last year. Still show sign of being green wood, and cut like it compared to the big, super hard, long dead Red Oak I usually cut. This one will likely need an extra season.

(I've come to realize most people aren't interested in a real-time, several minute video, so this is edited down to under a minute)

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We to normally fill 3 times a year for the house. We are still on our first tank. It's at 20% right now and I should refill in case of that one last cold spell but...............
As for the garage 20 mins with the bullet heater and she's warm.
I wish I could do that in the shop with a torpedo. I mean, I COULD, but it's about a six car garage/shop, and it would take more than 20 minutes, and quite a bit of kerosene. I'm going to either install a wood stove next year or a suspended forced air unit.
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There is a coefficient that is used to adjust the volume of fuel delivered as if it were at 60°.....
60° Is the "standard" ...when fuel is warmer than 60° and a vessel is filled the fuel will contract as it cools giving the impression that the tank was not filled...by correcting to 60°, it prevents you from being overcharged. In very simple terms adjusting for temperature allows for contraction or expansion based on the temperature.
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There is a coefficient that is used to adjust the volume of fuel delivered as if it were at 60°.....
60° Is the "standard" ...when fuel is warmer than 60° and a vessel is filled the fuel will contract as it cools giving the impression that the tank was not filled...by correcting to 60°, it prevents you from being overcharged. In very simple terms adjusting for temperature allows for contraction or expansion based on the temperature.
Okay Mark, I don't "really" understand your comment, but I get that it has something to do with temperature and expansion/contraction due to the temperature. I may call you tomorrow to have you explain it. Thanks.
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I sent you a PM to explain it a little better...feel free to call, though...be good to hear from you (y)
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With any luck, Sunday should have been my last firewood processing day of the year. Went to start the splitter and ripped the pull rope right out. Upgraded it to some 550 paracord. Long day of cutting and splitting...



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What kind of splitter do you have?
Troy-Bilt.

Technically, it's my little brothers. He bought a new bass boat a couple years ago and had no place to store it. I have plenty of room. So my storage fee is occasional use. He likes to split wood in warmer weather, I prefer to do it in the cold, so it all works out.
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It was a nice day today, so I decided to finish up bucking the Cedar I dropped a couple weeks ago. Brought out 4 saws to get some run time on each of them. Used the Stihl MS660 and 026 along with my brothers 2 Sachs Dolmars, a 115 and a 119.

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It was a nice day today, so I decided to finish up bucking the Cedar I dropped a couple weeks ago. Brought out 4 saws to get some run time on each of them. Used the Stihl MS660 and 026 along with my brothers 2 Sachs Dolmars, a 115 and a 119.

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What are you doing with the cedar? That's not meant for a fireplace or woodstove, is it? I just use cedar for our outdoor firepit.
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What are you doing with the cedar? That's not meant for a fireplace or woodstove, is it? I just use cedar for our outdoor firepit.
I've been heating the house all winter on Cedar's like this one. This has a rotten core and there isn't any good wood to make lumber out of so it gets burned in the house and shop. Works great for us. What type of Cedar do you have? This is Western Red Cedar.
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I've been heating the house all winter on Cedar's like this one. This has a rotten core and there isn't any good wood to make lumber out of so it gets burned in the house and shop. Works great for us. What type of Cedar do you have? This is Western Red Cedar.
I'm not even sure what type of cedar we have up here. I actually Googled it after you asked me that question, and apparently we've got four kinds of cedar? I only have a few on my property, but I got some from the in-laws last year, and I knew when I picked it up that it wasn't going to burn very long because it was SO light. So, we burned it in the firepit.
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I'm not even sure what type of cedar we have up here. I actually Googled it after you asked me that question, and apparently we've got four kinds of cedar? I only have a few on my property, but I got some from the in-laws last year, and I knew when I picked it up that it wasn't going to burn very long because it was SO light. So, we burned it in the firepit.
This Cedar will burn fast, but I get about 4 hrs out of 4-5 pieces in the woodstove depending on size. That usually brings the temp in the basement up from 68° to around 80° which is plenty warm. I think there are a couple species of Oak in Western Washington but I rarely see any and we don't have any in our woodlot. Douglas Fir has close to the same BTU's as Oak which we have but its way more valuable as lumber. I usually burn mostly Alder since it grows like weeds here. I didn't get any put away last year so I have been cutting these dead standing Cedar trees for firewood this year which are dry and ready to burn.
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This Cedar will burn fast, but I get about 4 hrs out of 4-5 pieces in the woodstove depending on size. That usually brings the temp in the basement up from 68° to around 80° which is plenty warm. I think there are a couple species of Oak in Western Washington but I rarely see any and we don't have any in our woodlot. Douglas Fir has close to the same BTU's as Oak which we have but its way more valuable as lumber. I usually burn mostly Alder since it grows like weeds here. I didn't get any put away last year so I have been cutting these dead standing Cedar trees for firewood this year which are dry and ready to burn.
It's funny how things are so different with firewood burning from one area of the country to another. When I'm on the Arborist's forum, and the West Coast guys are talking about whatever conifer they're burning, it just seems so weird to me. Obviously you've got to "dance with who you brung", and they don't have the hardwood available, so they burn what they have to. But as a former 20+ year carpenter, when I think about burning Doug Fir, I can't help but to cringe. We used Doug Fir to cut rafters and stair stringers due to their load carrying capacity, and they were expensive even back then. I don't know what a Doug Fir 25' 2" X 12" would cost now, with the lumber prices shooting up like they did a few years ago, but I'll bet the price of them was/is astronomical. So, the thought of dropping them in the woodstove just kills me.
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It's funny how things are so different with firewood burning from one area of the country to another. When I'm on the Arborist's forum, and the West Coast guys are talking about whatever conifer they're burning, it just seems so weird to me. Obviously you've got to "dance with who you brung", and they don't have the hardwood available, so they burn what they have to. But as a former 20+ year carpenter, when I think about burning Doug Fir, I can't help but to cringe. We used Doug Fir to cut rafters and stair stringers due to their load carrying capacity, and they were expensive even back then. I don't know what a Doug Fir 25' 2" X 12" would cost now, with the lumber prices shooting up like they did a few years ago, but I'll bet the price of them was/is astronomical. So, the thought of dropping them in the woodstove just kills me.

Wow, if you don't like Doug Fir being made into firewood, how do you feel about Black Walnut? :eek: :censored::oops:😁

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Wow, if you don't like Doug Fir being made into firewood, how do you feel about Black Walnut? :eek: :censored::oops:😁

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Ya, even worse. I was watching a "Rockhill Farm" YouTube last night, and he was processing some black walnut into firewood as well. And yes, I absolutely cringed when I saw him (and now yours) too!

I just envision all of those nice potential gunstocks going into the fire, and it almost hurts me to watch! And obviously, not ALL black walnut is appropriate grade for veneers and gunstocks, but man, the thought of burning it up sure does make me feel a twinge!
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I tried out my chainsaw mill for the first time today. These were some pieces of a standing dead spruce I took down for my neighbor last fall. Now I wish I didn’t cut them so short, but I made lengths I could easily move with my tractor.

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I still need some practice, but it was a successful first try.


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I tried out my chainsaw mill for the first time today. These were some pieces of a standing dead spruce I took down for my neighbor last fall. Now I wish I didn’t cut them so short, but I made lengths I could easily move with my tractor.

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I still need some practice, but it was a successful first try.


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Nice job! So, give us (me) your setup and impression so far! That is the Granderg mill, right? Which model? And what saw is that, and what length bar?

I've been thinking about getting one of those for a while now, and keep forgetting.

Also, I see that you didn't square the entire log up, like I see most people do. Did you have a problem with it rolling around as you were cutting slabs?

Did you use one of your regular stock chains, or did you order one of Granberg's ripping chains? Were you satisfied with how the chain performed? All of these questions.........."Inquiring minds want to know"!!! LOL.
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Nice job! So, give us (me) your setup and impression so far! That is the Granderg mill, right? Which model? And what saw is that, and what length bar?

I've been thinking about getting one of those for a while now, and keep forgetting.

Also, I see that you didn't square the entire log up, like I see most people do. Did you have a problem with it rolling around as you were cutting slabs?

Did you use one of your regular stock chains, or did you order one of Granberg's ripping chains? Were you satisfied with how the chain performed? All of these questions.........."Inquiring minds want to know"!!! LOL.
Ditto to all of that!!!

Plus, what is the maximum length you can cut with that?

Mike
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when I think about burning Doug Fir, I can't help but to cringe.
The Fir that we do burn is usually the tops and branches and rarely the whole tree. The only reason to burn the whole tree would be a tree that grew out in the open and was full of big branches all the way to the ground. Then they are really fun to split with all of the big knots. The Douglas Fir is way different than the Hemlock also know as Hem-Fir thats sold for studs. Its heavier and stronger.
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It’s a cheap knock off of the Granberg that I got on fleebay for $75. I ran my full chisel full comp chain that I had for my 28” bar on my PS7900. It dulls really easily.
I just got a 36” bar for my Homelite 1050, but I’m still trying to figure out the right chain. I plan to try a semi chisel, skip tooth.

The Dolmar is a 79cc saw that I feel is fairly snappy for normal felling/ bucking, but it feels like a total wuss milling. I can see why folks run the big saws milling. I am looking forward to trying the 100cc Homelite. A new MS661 or MS880 just isn’t in the budget right now. If I see a decent price on a used MS661 or 395XP, I might bite.

The limit of length is only how long your guide is. Lots of folks use ladders or unistrut. I have about 15’ of unistrut. I have no need to do anything longer for now. The guide helps you make the first cut straight. I used it for each cut because it overhangs and helps start the cut.

There is a 17 page thread on arboristsite just on milling 101. The guys that are really good at it do lots of special stuff, but the basic operation isn’t that tough.

I want to make some rustic benches and a robust shelf for my shed to hold suitcase weights and fuel cans. I need some longer logs for the shelf.


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