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Discussion Starter #1
Bought a JD 140 with a Johnson loader on it a few weeks back, When I got it the sub frame looked as though someone tried to pick up a car with it. it was bent, broken, twisted, leaning and had been welded a few too many times. I decided the whole sub frame was beyond repair and ordered some new steel from metalsdepot, Shipping was a nightmare and my order was lost four times. It finaly got here.
Sorry the pics are poor.
Before


During





AFTER


I just ordered some parts to make a grapple, Once thats done and funds are available a backhoe will be joining the loader and hopefully a set of tri ribs upfront and 26x12-12 lugs in the rear
 

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Nice job. Must be handy around the yard!!!
Wish I could find one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Unfortunately half of my yard was tottaly dug up to replace the septic and was just reseeded so I'm limited as to where I can go with the tractors.
 

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I like seeing these before and after projects. Thanks for posting.:trink40:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I like seeing these before and after projects. Thanks for posting.:trink40:
I thought I took more pics of the build but apparently not, I would have liked to show the subframe hanging during the painting process to show the details better. The frame actually starts above the front wheels and two 2x3 3/16 rect tubes travel back under the rear axle and continue another 12" to give me somewhere to connect a backhoe. two more 2x3 tubes run perpendicular ontop of those and support the loader uprights, Lots of gussets and I think I'd blow out the tires long before the subframe bends or cracks. One thing I wish I had done and may do in the future is seal the 2x3's ends and use them for more fluid capacity.

A problem with these Johnson loaders is that there is not enough back curl on the bucket, With the bucket flat on the ground I can only curl the front up about 2" so scooping isn't possible, Its more of a push while raising and end up with half a bucket thing. I'm trying to figure out a remedy for this that won't end up allowing the bucket to dump backwards onto me when fully lifted. My current thought is to make a small blade for the grapple so I can push into the material and pull it into the bucket with the grapple blade.
 

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Nice work, thanks for the pics and especially the details on the steel stock measurments. While your waiting for the grass to grow make sure you take lots of pics of the BH build. (guess the bill for the septic job got ou thinking eh LOL)
 

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wow now see i need something like that haha those teeth on the bucket look nasty haha dirt better watch out nice job :fing32:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
wow now see i need something like that haha those teeth on the bucket look nasty haha dirt better watch out nice job :fing32:
Teeth are from tractor supply, not sure what they are usually used for. but they call em rock guards and have lots of styles.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay_10551_10001_43315_-1______?rFlag=true&cFlag=1


I think I have all the steel I'll need for the hoe (more 2x3 3/16) but the $600 valves and $400-600 for cylinders has me thinking twice. Anybody ever try making a front mounted hoe like from a skid steer that only has one cylender for bucket curl and all other movement uses the loader? I'm not sure how well a light GT would do with that. The other thing I'm looking into is buying a beat-up backhoe from a skid steer (the type that has all BH movement and outriggers) and mounting that on back.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's the front mount single cyl hoe.
I think the tractor would be too light though.


Here's what I'd be looking to buy/build (smaller)
 

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I thought I took more pics of the build but apparently not, I would have liked to show the subframe hanging during the painting process to show the details better. The frame actually starts above the front wheels and two 2x3 3/16 rect tubes travel back under the rear axle and continue another 12" to give me somewhere to connect a backhoe. two more 2x3 tubes run perpendicular ontop of those and support the loader uprights, Lots of gussets and I think I'd blow out the tires long before the subframe bends or cracks. One thing I wish I had done and may do in the future is seal the 2x3's ends and use them for more fluid capacity.

A problem with these Johnson loaders is that there is not enough back curl on the bucket, With the bucket flat on the ground I can only curl the front up about 2" so scooping isn't possible, Its more of a push while raising and end up with half a bucket thing. I'm trying to figure out a remedy for this that won't end up allowing the bucket to dump backwards onto me when fully lifted. My current thought is to make a small blade for the grapple so I can push into the material and pull it into the bucket with the grapple blade.
Try relocating your bucket cylinders to the top side of the arms. You should achieve more arc in rolling your bucket up.
 

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Teeth are from tractor supply, not sure what they are usually used for. but they call em rock guards and have lots of styles.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay_10551_10001_43315_-1______?rFlag=true&cFlag=1


I think I have all the steel I'll need for the hoe (more 2x3 3/16) but the $600 valves and $400-600 for cylinders has me thinking twice. Anybody ever try making a front mounted hoe like from a skid steer that only has one cylender for bucket curl and all other movement uses the loader? I'm not sure how well a light GT would do with that. The other thing I'm looking into is buying a beat-up backhoe from a skid steer (the type that has all BH movement and outriggers) and mounting that on back.
teeth are commonly used for breaking hard pack soil small frotn end loaders have them many times due to they have less power but still need to break ground but tons of loaders use them as well i would judt not try and reomove snow with them :Stop:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
teeth are commonly used for breaking hard pack soil small frotn end loaders have them many times due to they have less power but still need to break ground but tons of loaders use them as well i would judt not try and reomove snow with them :Stop:
I made it so the teeth come off with just four bolts and stay together on a bar so I don't lose em.
They are very strong, I hooked a huge root ball from an old bush with one tooth and tore the whole thing outa the dirt. musta been 2.5" roots running for 3' or so in all directions.
 
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