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Discussion Starter #1
As some of you guys who've helped on my other threads know, I've got my 116 torn pretty much all the way down. While it's in pieces, I'm trying to fix what I can. Which leads me to my question...

The hood is held to metal bumper with four rivets - two on each side. At some point, the rivets on one side got loose. Unfortunately, as the hood moved they started wallowing out a hole in the fiberglass. I didn't really notice it till it was too late and hole got big enough that the head of one pulled through the fiberglass. See pic.

I could put a bolt through the hole with a big washer. But I think that will just lead to a bigger hole down the road. So I wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions on fixing this and having it be structurally sound enough to hold the hood rivet? Could I use a structural epoxy? It seems like that would be an easier fix, rather than getting a fiberglass repair kit. But if I have to do fiber glassing, I guess I will.

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Discussion Starter #3
Correct, but neither are going to be a permanent fix unless I can get the hole in the hood back down to the correct shaft diameter for the screw/rivet. Right now it's the size of the rivet head.
 

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Is that steel bumper a single piece or are those flanges on the ends that bolt to the fiberglass removable from the part that goes across the front?
 

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OK, spoils my idea. Only thing I can think of is to use those flanges and outline it on some plywood that is barely larger and thicker, so it will form a pocket. Then I would fix the holes you have with some fiberglass, then put those plywood spacers in place, after you cover them with a cooking spray to release them, and then glass over them to form a pocket for the steel flanges, pull them out after the glass sets up. That should give you more material to hold the bumper in place. I've fixed the hoods on my 110 and 216 by glassing in broken mounts in a similar fashion.
 

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I'd make a plug with a wood dowel attached to a flat piece of wood, put it in the hole and then fill with epoxy, then drill out the wood dowel
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Crazy thought....what about drilling the fiberglass hole out and finding a metal bushing the size of the now larger hole in the fiberglass with an appropriately sized inside hole for the standard bolt? Finding that specific of a bushing may be a challenge though. And I don't have a metal shop.

I'm considering starting with epoxy like dave_r suggested. If it pops out at some point, then I can do the more aggressive fixes.
 

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Perhaps try to change the hinge setup, so that the "pin" is attached to the hood and can't rotate in that hole, and can only rotate in the holes on the tractor?
 

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Are you sure it is fiberglass ?
Most JD body panels for the past 20 years has been a special blend of Pollyprop unique to JD and I had to end up buying some very expensive welding sticks to do hood repairs on a SX & a 100 series
In situation like yours I have used a rubber grommet in the hole with a steel bush inside the grommet
Get a grommet that is a tight fit in the hole ( after you have made it round ) then a bush that is a tight fit in the grommet & loose fit on the bolt .
Use a cheap bolt that is soft so it wears out faster than the steel bush .
You also fit a pair of mudguard washers so they clamp down on the grommet to prevent it popping out of the hole .
 

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I’m assuming you were thinking a brass flange bushing, but there are plastic ones too. Here’s a link that will help. You can choose the hole size and length and a few other things.
 

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Yep, those aren’t fiberglass.
How about using a brass (?) tarp grommet? like your friendly Harbor Freight sells.
Pick a suitable size, then smear some JB Weld around the enlarged hole before crimping it down.

if you’re not too concerned about looks, you could also sandwich the hood between 2 pieces of SS, again using JB Weld.
 

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I suspect that’s fiberglass,81 model looks like.
IF it is fiberglass,go to Walmart and get a repair kit,
From the INSIDE grind an area to the outside ,grind it to a taper to the center and the center will be knife edge,cut fiberglass ,one layer the size of the hole,next layer will be larger until you get to the ground out area from the outside tape a piece of aluminum foil over the hole start laying the wet layers into the area small one first till you have them all in,maybe 6 to 8 layers,more if required.then redrill the hole.( you can lay in a thin piece of metal if you like) and drill through it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hmm...now I'm not sure it's fiberglass. It's a 1984 - the series was made from '81-85. It looked fiberglass-ish from the inside, there was some sort of "grain" to the material. And there seems to be an outer and inner layer. And the color is greyish. But...there are some pretty sharp angles cast inside the hood. Which I didn't think fiberglass did well. There are no identifying marks or labels cast into the material that might help. I do have a spare hood which is already broken - is there anyway to tell definitively?

I've never owned the polyprop hoods from the later models - what I'm seeing on YouTube is that they are green all the way through. No layers or grey colored material. Is that correct?

Here are a couple more pictures. First - a shot of where the hood is rubbing through in another spot. You can see the layers. And some of the "casting marks". Finally, the holes with rivets removed. I think the rivets were 1/4 inch, if that provides some scale.

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm also considering Plan C - which would be re-drilling the holes in good material, bolting/riveting the hood there and using JB Weld or something to fill the existing holes. I think the grommet/bush idea may work too.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Took a close look at my other broken hood. Definitely fiberglass. You can see the fibers where the front was caved in. Sooooo.....I'm thinking hard about going with Biker's plan. More work, but shouldn't bee too hard. Famous last words....
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Welp. I'm officially into it. Sanding is done. It's a little rough, but I'm thinking that will only help with adhesion. I don't have space all the way around the hole to sand out 1-2 inches, so we'll see how well it holds. Hopefully well enough!

My new Wen rotary tool worked well. I had an old black and decker one that I never liked. This was a perfect excuse to replace it!
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The outside is gel coat,then fiberglass buildup,your doing good,chop up some fibers to put in th hole to startmaybe a thimble full.
 
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