My Tractor Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about Tractors? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally took down all the barbed wire around my 4 acres, why would anyone use this stuff. OK it's done. I'm guessing I wound up about a mile or more and it was not fun.
I am installing 48" field fence 330' rolls. I put up one side about 375' on a HILL so far.
It looks ok nice and tight and all but it's sort of against the woods so no one sees it. The next two sections will be seen by me mainly since there is only one more house behind me.

Question is I have all hills, Would it look better with the t-post level as I have done or some have suggested a 90 degree angle with the ground????
Has anyone here installed any either way.
 

·
Senior Tinkerer
Joined
·
1,619 Posts
I think your choice of making the posts "level" and not perpendicular to the ground is best. Looking at a fence that has posts that appear to be falling over would be worse than seeing the mismatch between the grid lines of the fence and the posts.

I remember that on "slight" grades I would often force the grid lines to match the posts by kinking the horizontal runs. Not very practical, but it was a little more satisfying! :D

Gerald
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,646 Posts
Do them straight up and down. Run a long string drive the post in the ground and bend the straight by eye will be good. That's how I did mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,114 Posts
Your question about barbwire and "why would anyone use this stuff?" is simple to answer.

If your running fence around a few acres the cost differential is not that great. If you have to fence in a few square miles and put in cross fences it makes a hugh difference. Maintenance of a barbwire fence is much simpler than net fence. If you have a critter push down a net fence it takes awhile to get it back up and tight again. Barbwire is much simpler to repair, net fence takes time to properly splice. Barbwire discourages cattle and horses from leaning on it as they will on a net fence. Net fences catch, and hold, wind blown tumbleweeds and other debris, such junk tends to blow thru a barbwire fence. It's necessary with net fence to have the post at shorter intervals to maintain a cattle tight fence as it's easier for them to push the fence down by leaning on it. Also, as a net fence builds up with trash, wind will cause the net to stretch which is much more of a problem with the post farther apart.

Barbwire fence is also easier to put up, especially in timber and/or hilly country.

I'd set the posts plumb. They look odd if set at an angle. Least ways they do to me.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your question about barbwire and "why would anyone use this stuff?" is simple to answer.

If your running fence around a few acres the cost differential is not that great. If you have to fence in a few square miles and put in cross fences it makes a hugh difference. Maintenance of a barbwire fence is much simpler than net fence. If you have a critter push down a net fence it takes awhile to get it back up and tight again. Barbwire is much simpler to repair, net fence takes time to properly splice. Barbwire discourages cattle and horses from leaning on it as they will on a net fence. Net fences catch, and hold, wind blown tumbleweeds and other debris, such junk tends to blow thru a barbwire fence. It's necessary with net fence to have the post at shorter intervals to maintain a cattle tight fence as it's easier for them to push the fence down by leaning on it. Also, as a net fence builds up with trash, wind will cause the net to stretch which is much more of a problem with the post farther apart.

Barbwire fence is also easier to put up, especially in timber and/or hilly country.

I'd set the posts plumb. They look odd if set at an angle. Least ways they do to me.

Mike
Thanks for the responses I will be putting electric high and 16" or so off the ground also. I have a bad problem with dogs and hogs where I'm at.
I used to have chickens, goats, turkeys and a few other animal but it's others pets who I have a problem with, although I can shoot them here I just think in the long run this is easier. I even used to rent out my barn but like I said the horses would get run by the dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Fence post and Hills? Tencubed

Tencubed you seem to have a lot of experience with fences. I have had 2 electric fence charges now in about 3 years. They were by no means maxed out for distance but the first one just stopped working after a year and a few months, the second one same thing even made a nice cover for it, lightening arresters, they aren't being grounded out that I can see. The goats would eat right up to the wire then down. They were both Zareba® 50 Mile AC Low Impedance Chargers. The only thing worth changing was the fuses and the cap but both gave out after 14 or 16 months.
Thanks for all the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,114 Posts
Re: Fence post and Hills? Tencubed

Tencubed you seem to have a lot of experience with fences. I have had 2 electric fence charges now in about 3 years. They were by no means maxed out for distance but the first one just stopped working after a year and a few months, the second one same thing even made a nice cover for it, lightening arresters, they aren't being grounded out that I can see. The goats would eat right up to the wire then down. They were both Zareba® 50 Mile AC Low Impedance Chargers. The only thing worth changing was the fuses and the cap but both gave out after 14 or 16 months.
Thanks for all the help.
Way too many miles of fence put up and maintained over the years. Necessary evil of farming and having cattle and other critters. The OP having hog problems really limits his use of other than good hog netting IMO.

Electric fences are not real successful in this area. Too dry for a major part of the year for them to work well so I don't have a lot of experience with them. We have used them around the garden as a bit of added insurance against wayward critters. Can't really recommend any particular brand for you. Smarts some to back into one when you're on wet ground and your shoes are damp.:banghead3

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
"Good Fences make good Neighbors".
Most states have very specific laws regarding what is a legal fence. Iowa for instance is not an open range state.
Meanig that if a landowners stock get onto someone elses property the owner of the stock is liable for damage. If a cow get on the highway and is hit by a vehicle the owner of that cow is responsible for the damage.
BTW in an Open Range State, the livestock on the highway have the "Right of Way".
In Iowa a legal farm fence must be 3 ft woven wire with 3 strands of Barbwire abouve it or 5 strands of barbed wire( I believe there are specific measurements between the wires too). And as far as the posts, the old timers will tell you they must be"Straight with The World". Plumb them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK ran into a problem today with the wire mark outs. On the one side of my property for about 400' there are High Voltage wires right under where the fence was/is/going to be. I was removing the barbed wire and the locust post that are mostly rotted and I have been replacing them with T-Post and 6"x6"s in the corners. The locust post are 8'-10' apart so if I just remove them they are about 30" in the ground and put the T-Post in the same hole and just back fill what are the chances of the ground hardening up enough to support the 48" field fence. Or will I have to put some cement around the T-Post??????
The paper work for the mark out said nothing with-in 3' of the mark out, But these locust post have been there for 30 years or so and the gentleman who marked out the property said the wires SHOULD BE at least 48" deep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
Hold the Fort! If your talking High voltage power lines, you certainly don't want to drive a steel post into the wires! Better call 1-800-Dig before you go further. Not only is there a danger to you, but a digging without calling can result in your being charged or all damages occuring from power interuption.
Better to move off a bit if that's the case. I've know of people losing stock to electrocution if a fence was close enough when a wire broke under ground.

Depth of your posts, has a lot to do with frost heave. In NC I have no idea how deep that is. In central Iowa we would go at least 44".

I have put the posts in clay soil tamped well, put crushed rock,tamped in the hole and cemented them in. Depends a lot on the ground your working with and the tention of the wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh I haven't done nothing on that side yet but remove the barber wire. And I did call and that's who marked the wires for me, here it's 811.
I'm definitely not going to pound anything or auger near the wires at all. I was just wondering if the ground around the T-Post would would harden up enough or if I needed to cement them. We have red clay and rocks here, in the summer you can't dig a 3" hole with out a pick, in the wet weather it's like ice it's so slick. This is why I'm doing it now.
Thanks you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
Why would you dig a hole for T-posts? Why would "high voltage" lines be buried? I can understand if the buried wire is for your or someone else' service entrance. But does anyone bury high voltage lines?

Drive the T-posts into the ground. The wing plates on the post need to be buried, beyond that you're not gaining any strength. Do call the before you dig folks before installing the fence.

As for the frost heave in NC, really bad years could go a few inches deep. C'mon, he's in North Carolina not North Dakota.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Why would you dig a hole for T-posts? Why would "high voltage" lines be buried? I can understand if the buried wire is for your or someone else' service entrance. But does anyone bury high voltage lines?

Drive the T-posts into the ground. The wing plates on the post need to be buried, beyond that you're not gaining any strength. Do call the before you dig folks before installing the fence.

As for the frost heave in NC, really bad years could go a few inches deep. C'mon, he's in North Carolina not North Dakota.
Are you joking or trying to get someone seriously hurt?
I don't know where you are at but high voltage wires are buried all over the country as far as I know. At least in all the states I've been in or lived.
If you like you can come here and drive in the T-Post over the lines.
If you read the post you would know why, I am pulling out locust post and want to put the T-Post in the same hole so I wouldn't have drive them in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: Fence post and Hills? UPDATE QUESTION?

OK as I said I removed every piece of barbed wire on my property finally. Installed all my corners using 6"x6" with a cross piece on the top and wire across and cemented all in. All the T-post are in except about 100' in front still trying to decide what to do there.
One side is 440' the other is about 360', the other sides have shorter runs and turns no longer then about 150' or so. My question is how long of a run of 48" field fence can be stretched without putting a 6"x6" H in the middle? The one side I did earlier against the woods I would like to tighten up also.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top