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Here is the felling video.

 
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Here is the felling video.

Let's see, you planned on missing the stacked wood, landing it on the tree at the top so you don't have to get in the dirt. My hats off to you.

CCMoe
 

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Its within a foot or two of where I was aiming. If it was going into the stacked wood it would be hung up in another tree.

The other tree is cut into milling logs ready to haul and the first logs a stacked at the mill waiting.

GOPR1175-m.JPG GOPR1176-m.JPG GOPR1178-m.JPG GOPR1179-m.JPG GOPR1180-m.JPG
 
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Nice to have all the tools for a job like that!

Mike
 
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Discussion Starter · #425 · (Edited)
Just back from the cabin in the mountains where we held our annual Spring work day. My role was cutting the accumulated logs on our firewood pile, and removing 4 trees that have been deemed too close to our cabin. This big 122 year old, tight-ringed oak is just around 3' from the corner of our cabin.

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The two oaks to the left of this tree also came down and are subject of their own video. This tall oak that was carrying most of the weight of the crown on two large limbs hanging over our cabin roof. First, I dazzled the assembled crowd (about 10 guys) with an absolutely spot on slingshot launch of the throw bag and line through the large crotch. Then we rigged a stout line through a snatch block and to the hitch hook of a game old GMC diesel pick-up. Of course this tree served many purposes in it's life here, including target holder for some sighting in. And, of course, I hit spark throwing metal before I even got the face notch cut:

Its about 5:30 minutes of the saw struggling valiantly to overcome the dulling effects of the nail/slug/wire.


And, included in the audience were a couple different angles of cell video (I hope to get some of it) and a drone video. Stand by, all will be forwarded to me in due time, and I'll share them here!. There are other pictures and video in pre-production. In the mean time, here is a speeded up version of the drone controller video (not near the resolution of the recorded video that is still in the drone)

37 second version of the same action as above, and from above:

 

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Discussion Starter · #426 ·
And taking down another, slightly farther from the cabin, but of sketchy health, which was verified as being substantially hollow when it came down:

 

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Discussion Starter · #427 ·
And this one was the troublesome tree. My rigger is a field worker for a power company, and seems to have access to all manner of equipment. What I learned later is that his company does safety tests on much of their equipment, and lets the workers take home anything that fails. Or at least they do take the failures.

So, here is a 4:30 minute video made up of a couple parts:
  1. Part one about a minute of setting the face notch and starting the back cut
  2. Followed by about 3 minutes of scrambling when the steering line snapped after they started pulling the tree down. The tree stood back upright, and teetered back toward our cabin briefly.
  3. And finally about 10 seconds of finishing the cut after a stronger rope was applied.


Not a very good tribute to my management of this take down at all. The only redemption is that it ultimately landed right where we wanted it, which was right beside the brush pile that we kept burning all day. The fire was hot enough to burn up all the green brush from 4 trees I cut down.

As I have posted before; I do not recommend anyone use my video as a "How To" for chainsaw work. Certainly least of all this one.
 

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And this one was the troublesome tree. My rigger is a field worker for a power company, and seems to have access to all manner of equipment. What I learned later is that his company does safety tests on much of their equipment, and lets the workers take home anything that fails. Or at least they do take the failures.

So, here is a 4:30 minute video made up of a couple parts:
  1. Part one about a minute of setting the face notch and starting the back cut
  2. Followed by about 3 minutes of scrambling when the steering line snapped after they started pulling the tree down. The tree stood back upright, and teetered back toward our cabin briefly.
  3. And finally about 10 seconds of finishing the cut after a stronger rope was applied.


Not a very good tribute to my management of this take down at all. The only redemption is that it ultimately landed right where we wanted it, which was right beside the brush pile that we kept burning all day. The fire was hot enough to burn up all the green brush from 4 trees I cut down.

As I have posted before; I do not recommend anyone use my video as a "How To" for chainsaw work. Certainly least of all this one.
Well that was interesting, glad that it decided not to fall the other direction, of course you wouldn't have had to carry in the firewood if it did! :)
 

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Pretty surprised the rope gave out..it almost looked like you were playing the video in reverse, when it stood back up
 

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Discussion Starter · #430 ·
I did not see the rope section that broke, but I have a strong suspicion it was nicked prior to this use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #431 · (Edited)
Well, just as I expected a relaxing day today, my daughter called and asked if I would help take down a small diameter, but quite tall ornamental tree that has been rubbing their house. I took my pole saw and my rope and snatch block.

Grandson and I set the guide rope and he put a couple test pulls on it in full safety gear:

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Then we scored some tasty grilled meats on the deck, and back to set the snatch block and put a pair of strong backs on the guide rope:

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This still green tree was easy work with the pole saw, I scored the face to avoid peeling the bark and then cut the back:

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Once on the ground the timber men stood still for a success picture:

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And out of nowhere a wood pixie showed up and I couldn't turn down a picture:

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Very simple and small tree, but with this kind of help, it was a pleasure to do some Dad work.
 

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Nice!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #433 ·
Just like many of my posts begin: Yesterday while hiking in the woods I heard chainsaws and a chipper, so Scout and I meandered in that direction and watched a crew working on large oaks on a property just across the road from the woods. I was intrigued by the tow behind lift they were using and watched for a while as a single arborist navigated up, down, across, and around a tree as he ascended and cut limbs with a top handle saw. Then I was hyper-impressed when he lowered his platform to the tow position to move on to another tree. Instead of climbing down and re-hitching to his truck to move it he deployed the traction drive on his lift, and while still in his platform, raised the hydro stabilizers, and "drove" his lift to the next tree. Well, knock me down with a feather. I need one of these!

 

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Wow! I've used a rented towable lift, but had no idea self-propelled ones were built!

I don't know that I'd want to be in the bucket unless driving across flat, level pavement, though.

Mike
 
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