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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Bolens 1886 with a home made FEL on it.

It originally just had single action cylinders fot lift, and I've had them replaces with double action ones so I now have down pressure.

However, I would like to slow down the speed at which it operates. It's WAY too fast, and I'm wondering how to slow it down.

Anyone have a solution?
 

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Install a flow control valve and adjust until you get the desired speed you want. Easy to install and can always readjust if higher/lower cycle times are needed.


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Get a smaller pump; or bigger cylinders. Be careful, your relief valve is probably in the directional control valve block. Don't put a valve ahead of it unless you add another relief directly after pump. A flow control inline will cause heat and make engine labour unnessessarly. A meter off circuit may work.
 

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Throttle back the engine.

I have used 1/2 - 2/3 throttle for loader work with my GTs and my SCUT for 35 years. You don't require more power than that and full throttle is too much of an adventure!

If that isn't satisfactory, put a 1" bigger pulley on the pump.
 

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Let's see.

A $70 flow control which will generate additional heat, and depending on the duration and nature of the task, may also require an oil cooler and fan with associated plumbing and wiring.

Or

A $20 pulley and a $20 belt.

Or

The zero cost option, pull back the throttle.

Additional information can reduce these alternatives to the correct choice.

- What engine rpm is being used?

- What are the pulley sizes currently used?

- What is the displacement of the pump?

- What are the cylinder sizes?

It should be noted that loader work with a GT is not horsepower intensive. It is rare that more than 8 hp is required, usually less than 5 hp. Of course, if a restrictor (flow control) is added, horsepower requirements automatically increase to compensate. More horsepower requires more fuel.

I use 1/2 to 2/3 throttle with a slightly larger pump and flow rate than I recommend to others and that leaves me with enough power to spin the tire chain equipped 26x12-12s at will with 650 lb of ballast at the rear of the MF1655.
 

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There's a relief in the valve block. Putting valve ahead of it is a bad idea; could blow up pump. Restricting the tank line will back pressure the valves and cause premature leaking and possibly weird operation.

This is a bleed off type flow control, c/w relief, and is the best of any Band-Aid solutions. http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?item=9-064-75&catname=hydraulic

Here's a pump close to the same price that is a much better solution. http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?item=9-7769-B&catname=hydraulic
I haven't checked the flow of this pump.

What size pump do you have now.
 

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Hydronerd, that pump is a bit large for a 1:1 pulley ratio for a GT sized loader. This is a better fit for the same money.

"Band-Aid" solutions. I like that! :fing32: Hydraulics is complicated enough without adding to the mystery. :fing20:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, even at a very low, almost idle throttle setting, it's still way too fast.

I bought this the way it is, and I'm thinking that the guy that built it didn't know a whole lot about hydraulics.

The rated PTO speed for the Large Frame Bolens is 2000 RPM, and with the pulley setup the pump is running MUCH faster.

I guess I need to look for a pulley to bring it down to closer to a 1:1 ratio?

Here's what it looks like now:
 

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This pump should work:
http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?item=9-8401-251&catname=hydraulic

It says direct couple; ie no belt drive, but its the same construction as the pump you have now and should be OK, but I wouldn't warranty it.

You should be able to unbolt the existing and bolt this one in. Keep the old pump for log splitting.
100% agreement here! Same pulleys, same belt.

These little pumps do have a limited life with side loading from belt drives, but "limited life" is a relative term. GT FELs rarely work more than 100 hours per year and you should get several years of service from that pump.
 

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I was thinking about your problem. A log splitter pump is a Hi-lo pump and has two sections. The high pressure section would work fine for a FEL. I haven't had one apart, but If your OK with experimenting; try that tall nut thing. If there's an adjustment under it back it all the way out. If there's no adjustment; take the spring out.
 

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That's one way. Another option is to slow the pump down. Reverse the pulleys.

Those pumps are designed for direct connection to the engine crank turning at 3600 rpm. Coming off the 2000 rpm PTO the OP used a 7" and 4" pully (or similar ratio) to boost pump speed back up to 3500 rpm. Reversing the pulleys will drop the pump speed to 1140 rpm. If the rated flow for the pump is 16 gpm at 3600 rpm, that will bring it down to 5 gpm, which is right in the ballpark for the flow that you need. Further adjustments can be made with the size of the larger pulley. A bit larger in size will slow the pump more and a bit smaller will increase the flow rate.

This has the added advantage of giving a warning of overload. Most of these logsplitter pumps have an unloader valve that kicks in at 900 psi and dumps the major part of the oil flow. It will slow the loader dramatically if there is no relief valve set lower.

900 psi will lift about 1000 lb with these loaders.
 

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That would work flow wise; but the torque and therefore the side load will increase 400%; which I wouldn't recommend on a pump that specified direct drive.
 

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Less flow, less torque, and less horsepower is not likely going to increase the side load more than what it is currently. There is a big horsepower difference between moving 16 gpm and moving 5 gpm at a specific pressure. The pressure won't change just because the flow is reduced, that takes a change in the weight of payload being moved.

That being said, those pumps are made for direct drive and will wear out the front bushing relatively quickly when driven by v-belt. It might wear out in less than 500 hours instead of 5000.

Bottom line, it's a lot more pump than is needed and one of the previously suggested pumps would be better, but those also are made for direct drive and not for v-belts. Save this one for a log splitter or as a trading piece.
 
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