My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Yanmar YM240D with front end loader. I am new to tractors and hydraulics.

The control valve is a Salami VDM05-DD. I have not been able to find any info on this valve.

Do people generally try to repair the controls or just replace them?

Do I just disconnect the hoses from the control valve or do I need to bleed the pressure somehow?

I'm not sure about terminology so I may not describe the parts correctly. It appears that my control valve is leaking around the "piston" that the lever pushes in and out. Is it fairly easy to remove this part? And what kind of parts can I expect to replace? Just o-rings?

Thanks.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,501 Posts
The terminology is simple, A control valve set has a valve body, one or more valve spools, the control handle(s) and the end caps covering the ends of the spools opposite from the handles.

The repair involves removing the handles and the end caps, and possibly retainers for the O-rings around each spool at each end of the valve body The centering springs on each spool may also have to be removed to slide the spools out of the body. Note that the spools are not interchangeable and must go back in the same locations. Remove and replace the 4 O-rings and reassemble.

I did this on my MF GC 2310 a couple of years ago and it took less than 30 minutes, including removing the valve set from the tractor to straighten out the plate on which it was mounted. It's easier to change the O-rings with the valve set on a work bench. (Less chance of losing small screws in the dirt and more maneuvering room for the screwdriver.)

To bleed off any residual pressure, shut off the engine and cycle both spools several times after the bucket is on the ground.

O-rings can be sourced at a hydraulics shop, auto parts store, or most hardware stores.

The work lines on my valve set have colour coded quick disconnects (small coloured zip ties), and the supply and return lines should be tied out of the way after disconnecting them.

Start it up when it's all back together and you're back in business. No bleeding necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. This is just what I needed to give me the confidence to get started. Now I've successfully completed the repair. What a great feeling to have repaired my tractor for only US $2.29.

My only concern with the repair is that the end of one of the spools, where the lever attaches, is pitted a good amount. It looks like the pitting will ride over the o-ring. If it lasts a few years I can deal with replacing them again.

I was wondering if there is supposed to be a gasket on the end cap with the handle. When I took it apart it looked like there was something only around the bolts.

Lastly, does anyone know if you can find replacement boots that cover the lower part of the lever?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,501 Posts
Well done! Not so scary once you get into it, is it?

There are no gaskets, only the O-rings to keep the oil in.

The rubber boots are probably only sourced from the OEM. If necessary, replacements might be fashioned using a bicycle inner tube and a couple of gear clamps..
 
  • Like
Reactions: haze5736
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top