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Today I tried out an older DR 6 ton 1.8hp electric wood splitter on some trees I fell earlier this year.

Gotta admit I was quite impressed. Quiet operation. Rained like heck here last few days and I liked the convenience of working within the dry garage without a noisy gas motor running in my ears.

My Better half and I were able to put up a full cord in a couple of hours her man-ing the splitter and me placing the logs and stacking without breaking a sweat. Logs were 14-16 inches in length , 12 -14 inches in diameter. Birch and Poplar mostly. Only had a few that hung up due to stringers.

Only a few complaints (I understand it;s a safety feature for home owners ) but the two hand operation of the DR was a bit of a turn off having to press the button with one hand and use the lever to cycle with the other hand kinda peeved me a bit. Cycle time was also a bit slow but I was in no real hurry.

Due to it's low profile , I mounted it high on a table so I would not have to bend over all day. mounting high definitely helped spare my back.
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Since this was my Brother in Laws I used as a test before considering purchase,

I was wondering if anyone has used the Ramsplitter 12 or 16 electric model (wired either for 110 or 220 and could provide a review of their experience?
 

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Today I tried out an older DR 6 ton 1.8hp electric wood splitter on some trees I fell earlier this year.

Gotta admit I was quite impressed. Quiet operation. Rained like heck here last few days and I liked the convenience of working within the dry garage without a noisy gas motor running in my ears.

My Better half and I were able to put up a full cord in a couple of hours her man-ing the splitter and me placing the logs and stacking without breaking a sweat. Logs were 14-16 inches in length , 12 -14 inches in diameter. Birch and Poplar mostly. Only had a few that hung up due to stringers.

Only a few complaints (I understand it;s a safety feature for home owners ) but the two hand operation of the DR was a bit of a turn off having to press the button with one hand and use the lever to cycle with the other hand kinda peeved me a bit. Cycle time was also a bit slow but I was in no real hurry.

Due to it's low profile , I mounted it high on a table so I would not have to bend over all day. mounting high definitely helped spare my back.
----------------------------

Since this was my Brother in Laws I used as a test before considering purchase,

I was wondering if anyone has used the Ramsplitter 12 or 16 electric model (wired either for 110 or 220 and could provide a review of their experience?
i would like to find input on those as well, 5-6 ton models, but with someone splitting red oak, white oak, green and or dry. Looked at a lot of Utube vids, and nothing on eastern oaks i can find. Around here, poplar and birch are softer woods
 

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I've never used one; so I can't be totally objective. I have split a lot of wood with a maul, and have used gas powered splitters a lot- we cut and split wood for my family, my parents, and my brothers family.
There is no way that a 6-10 ton electric splitter would touch what we split. For years we used a Northern Hydraulics splitter, unknown tonnage, which worked well- it is 6 horsepower, so it is a decently rated splitter. We now also have a 32 ton, which does very well. Even at that, we encounter stuff that they struggle to split.
So, it all depends on what you are splitting. If it is birch and popular, then you would probably be fine- for what it's worth, I'd rather split that by hand, which is a lot faster than using a splitter. For oak that is anything but straight or clean, locust, walnut, ash, etc., a much bigger splitter will be in order, in my opinion. I could be wrong- perhaps the trees are worse here- but no way would a 10 ton or less electric splitter do anything but make me want to throw it over a cliff.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi JohninMD

My Brother in Law's Furnace is a conversion unit that heats wood , oil , coal, His primary winter heat source is wood right off the farm every year. He has used this DR for a number of years now since he hurt his back , to split mixed hardwoods, Oak , Birch , poplar, Maple , Beech, hickory. MD and VT have similar hardwoods.

He has always touted how well it works so I finally relented and said let me give it a whirl. Though I have used much more powerful , Like I said I gotta admit the little unit did well in the garage. I do see it's purpose, and would also like to purchase one of these little units. I like the idea if something should happen to me Sherry can remain pretty self reliant.

I do not want a PTO driven one , when I cut I can skid right off the acreage right to the barn or garage where I can split and stack. My only dilemma is torn between Ramsplitter or DR. Id like to hear from someone who uses a Ramsplitter unit before purchase.



Hodge,
If you like , I have some more splitting to do and perhaps can make a quick vid of the little DR splitting some oak if you think it useful ? I've no doubt your operation is faster, but for non-commercial use where time is not $$ the little unit was quite a back saver once I mounted it high last weekend.
( It kept us productive out of the cold rain (almost sleet last weekend ..Brrrr) and was easy on the ears as electric and not noisy working in a contained building.
 

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I have the little $299 Ryobi one and it's perfect for me. There are many clones of this model, all about the same price. I am not splitting 8 cords a year, just stuff I take down around the house. I have done 14" dia white pine easily, and a 10" white oak (I try not to take down too many hardwoods). The hardest wood I've found to split with it is hickory, gnarly, knotty, yuck!

Pros:
The Ryobi is trouble free, easy to store and quiet as mentioned above. Inexpensive compared to any gas splitter

Cons:
You need electric power close to the wood
A little slow on the cycle
It will stop in really knotty wood. Usually turning to a different part of the grain will help.
Low to the ground, I put mine on a wagon, sit in my folding chair and throw the split logs over my shoulder into the Deere Model 80 trailer.
 

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This year i used a commercial grade 20 ton Vertical only log splitter i rented, had a 8 hp honda on it. I split up to 15" white oak, 2' red oak, locust, maple, ash,birch etc. Some that had been standing dead for a long time, some green. You could run that thing at idle and not hear the engine change sound at all in any of it. I split tree crotches, pushed 4" limb stubs off some pieces, and it never even groaned.
And it is sposed to be only a 20 ton model. Had a 36" stroke. wedge was 8" high.
Love to have one like it but i can imagine what it costs, i found a used one exactly like it on Ebay and it was still 1,500.00 I looked them up and the model i had weighed 930 lbs. I would show a link to them but for the life of me right now i cant remember the name of the darn thing.
I lucked out, its 65.00 for 24 hours rental. I got it on Saturday morning, and since the store is closed Sunday, didnt have to take it back, and... monday was labor day, store closed, so i got it 3 days for 65.00.

Anyway, if i had a electric one, and it would do the job, i could start splitting as i cut each year instead of all at once. Even if it would do 80/90% of it, rest could be done with maul or sledge and wedge.
I dont cut any pine, around here we have much oak dead due to the gypsy moths. Plus the mountain i cut is heavy infested with maple, which i dont care for either. Most the locust here are dead or dying as well.
My best wood is red/white oak, about 16" long, and still 8" thick after split. So that also cuts down on amount of splitting.
When you are over 50, have had one heart attack, you dont really care about cycle time either. All you care about is a ram doing the work and not you.
I see a 7 ton for 400.00, also electric. just cant imagine if quality is good, why one like that wouldnt be good enough for that 80/90%
I also like the idea of using it in my garage, out of the weather. what else ya gonna do on rainy days? :)

i would love to see a vid of a smaller electric doing red/white oak as well. I know red doesnt split that hard, but wehn you are doing pieces 2' across its a little different story
 

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Today I tried out an older DR 6 ton 1.8hp electric wood splitter on some trees I fell earlier this year.

Gotta admit I was quite impressed. Quiet operation. Rained like heck here last few days and I liked the convenience of working within the dry garage without a noisy gas motor running in my ears.

My Better half and I were able to put up a full cord in a couple of hours her man-ing the splitter and me placing the logs and stacking without breaking a sweat. Logs were 14-16 inches in length , 12 -14 inches in diameter. Birch and Poplar mostly. Only had a few that hung up due to stringers.

Only a few complaints (I understand it;s a safety feature for home owners ) but the two hand operation of the DR was a bit of a turn off having to press the button with one hand and use the lever to cycle with the other hand kinda peeved me a bit. Cycle time was also a bit slow but I was in no real hurry.

Due to it's low profile , I mounted it high on a table so I would not have to bend over all day. mounting high definitely helped spare my back.
----------------------------

Since this was my Brother in Laws I used as a test before considering purchase,

I was wondering if anyone has used the Ramsplitter 12 or 16 electric model (wired either for 110 or 220 and could provide a review of their experience?
I have had the DR electric 6-ton for about 3 or 4 years. It's not the same as the newer ones, but it works well for me. I bought a table with it (which it attaches to and gets it to the proper height) as well as some extra platform for the logs, which keeps them from falling off after being split. It does have its limitations, but splits 99% of what I need to split, which is generally 18" or less in diameter logs. I have split larger ones (up to 24"), but only if they have relatively straight grain and are good and dry. It has trouble with green wood.

I have cut some logs up to 36", but I generally split them in half with a maul or chainsaw before splitting on the machine.

The main advantage to this unit is that is can be run anywhere indoors, which I do frequently in the winter (in my pole building). No worry about fumes. and you can split where it's warm and dry. The disadvantage is portability, since you are tethered to a 120 outlet (I guess you could use a generator if you really wanted to go remote). I just take the wood to the splitter instead of the other way around. In general, I have liked the splitter for my purposes. If I had lots of large trees to split, I'd need to get another one. I might opt for a PTO driven one for my tractor in that case.
 
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