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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I have about a 20 year old asphalt driveway in need of replacement.

We have been looking at concrete. Got a estimate to replace 22’x90’ for both brushed as well we exposed aggregate. The aggregate looks a lot better in our opinion, but is also double the cost. If we go with aggregate, I thought of just putting stone at the last 10’ of the driveway by the road, rather than putting asphalt there.

Planning ahead, we will be retired within 30years and would love to not have to worry about another driveway replacement and I don’t see us living here too long into retirement when it comes.

Another reason we’re thinking of aggregate is we have an 1800s brick house and the aggregrate seems like to more modern and durable approach of a stone driveway. Also the different colors of stone would be a nice touch. Had stone growing up so I’m aware of the upkeep needed for that. I think we were told the seal for aggregrate will last 5-7 years. Broom finish seems too out of place. Stamped concrete might be too much with our brick.

I do have a snow blade I would use in the winter so I’d have to be careful with that. We do have 2 green ash trees that drop all over the driveway and I would alway use a broom to clear. I have found a local JD broom for sale at a good price (tired looking, supposedly works fine) that could help clean up easier.

We have been saving for this and plan for replacement next spring. I’m looking for any feedback, things to consider, other types of driveways, etc.
 

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All I know is pay attention to the base under whatever you choose. My drive was replaced about 12 years ago and they found all kinds of old wood, a rotting tree limb the builder dumped there, and other mushy areas under there that caused the original drive to sink, crack, and develop pot holes. Check into removal of whatever is there now down as much as a foot, and replace with correct aggregates well compacted. A good base will keep the surface in good shape a long time.
 

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I would say 5 to 7 years for the sealer on the aggregate finish is probably not going to happen.
On a walkway, maybe.
On a driveway with snow removal equipment, possibly deicing agents, I would say every year or two at the max.
 

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Kioti SCUT
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I can echo the "well compacted" suggestion. I had a new house built 13 years ago. The builder buried a lot of stones next to the foundation. He then covered them with dirt and paved over it.

Five years later, the driveway in front of the garage doors had sunk about 4 inches. I hired a different contractor. He cut and removed large squares in front of the garage. Filled it in and supposedly compacted it before paving it again.

Five years later, again, the same sections have sunk about 4 inches. It's now difficult to even pull into the garage. I need to have it all redone, and I'm considering concrete footings or a concrete apron. Cal

l
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Several things could be causing the drop in the approach, dirt compaction, improper compaction of any fill, sand, gravel, pea gravel over tile will shift. If there is tile, it could be washing away any fill over time.

Lot's of variables, hire an established concrete and discuss your issue at length.

CCMoe
 

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The large stone leave voids that the dirt works it's way down into.
That is where the settling is coming from.
When we put a driveway into a garage, #57 or 67 gravel from foundation all the way up to the bottom of the driveway slab.
Even though you can not compact clean stone, a plate compactor run across the gravel does settle it down.
Never had settling issues with the driveway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good to know, thank you all.
The company we tentatively are going with, based on reviews, is you get what you pay for. A little more expensive than others, but great. This is good info to inquire for long term success.

A small part of me wants a stone drive with concrete border.
 

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Mike514,

Is your garage attached to your house?

If it is, you should have a proper footing under your garage and it should be below the frost line.

If this is the case you will have a poured wall or block wall from the footer up.

CCMoe
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Garage is not attached. The garage wad added in 2001 and the concrete floor has had up really well. We park in there during the winter months only.
 

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Garage is not attached. The garage wad added in 2001 and the concrete floor has had up really well. We park in there during the winter months only.
Is your floor toothed in, perimeter of the slab 18" or so deep compared to 4" slab.

I would pour the approach similar to slab perimiter and pin it, (drill holes for rebar and install rebar to get them tied together), it will keep them on the same plane. I would taper the approach back 3 or 4 foot and score the concrete at that point to control crack, instal rebar through out the pad.

CCMoe
 

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Is your floor toothed in, perimeter of the slab 18" or so deep compared to 4" slab.

I would pour the approach similar to slab perimiter and pin it, (drill holes for rebar and install rebar to get them tied together), it will keep them on the same plane. I would taper the approach back 3 or 4 foot and score the concrete at that point to control crack, instal rebar through out the pad.

CCMoe
That is about the last thing I would do. Columns and beam tied to the garage foot would be a yes but to tie the drive to the garage slab never. Expansion and contraction will tear both apart. Sit the drive on the beam with a bond breaker and let it float. Use an expansion joint between the garage slab and drive.
 

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That is about the last thing I would do. Columns and beam tied to the garage foot would be a yes but to tie the drive to the garage slab never. Expansion and contraction will tear both apart. Sit the drive on the beam with a bond breaker and let it float. Use an expansion joint between the garage slab and drive.
It all depends on how you go about it.

Dig down below frost line and pin it, depends a lot on existing garage pad. Anything can be done, it comes at a price though.

How do you think the entrance at your local Walmart stays intact, they sure don't want a trip zone, they keep that for the parking lot.

CCMoe
 

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It all depends on how you go about it.

Dig down below frost line and pin it, depends a lot on existing garage pad. Anything can be done, it comes at a price though.

How do you think the entrance at your local Walmart stays intact, they sure don't want a trip zone, they keep that for the parking lot.

CCMoe
Not sure about yours but the local customer entrances to Walmart's are not driving surfaces here. Sidewalks are not even allowed to be pined to buildings.
 

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Pinned or not pinned, they remain consistaint with with entrance.

Neither of us have the Walmart prints to entrance, so I agree to disagree.

I would guess that it is footed below frost zone, walled and poured.

I've poured my share of concrete and never had a four inch drop in the approach to a garage, I would say it was inferior design and compaction.

CCMoe
 
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Pinned or not pinned, they remain consistaint with with entrance.

Neither of us have the Walmart prints to entrance, so I agree to disagree.

I would guess that it is footed below frost zone, walled and poured.

I've poured my share of concrete and never had a four inch drop in the approach to a garage, I would say it was inferior design and compaction.

CCMoe
I will agree with the inferior design and compaction. I have seen many four inch and greater drops in garage approached that merrily sheared the rebar or broke the concrete out. I have also poured my share of concrete and worked with the engineering of concrete products for years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Received a message Monday from the company wanting to start later this week. Came over last night to finalize what were doing. Mentioned he would be here with crew by 10am to start demoing.

This far, they have removed our 26'x4' front concrete walk way, 20'x90' blacktop driveway, and 26'x3' concrete garage apron. Have a trailer full wire mesh right now.

Our front walkway will be exposed aggregate with a slight S curve to the driveway.The driveway will be white concrete with diamond cut.

Want to pour walkway tomorrow.

Spent last night moving things I may need from the garage to either the shed or basement. Spent 2 hours this morning removing the remaining landscaping out front a long the walkway.
 
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