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I was just remembering some talk a few years ago, about using needle bearings(?) to make steering easier. I can't find anything about it now. Do any of you know what was used, where they were purchased, and if any of you tried it...how well did it work and hold up?

I am considering a small front bucket, and just thought this might be worth investigating.

Any information would be appreciated.
 

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McMaster Carr
IIRC you`ll need 2 pcs of 5909K36 Needle brgs
4 pcs of 5909K49 washers

OR
2 pcs of 2855T7 ( graphite plugged bronze washers) Perhaps slightly less reduction in friction but they have no needles to break and no voids to collect dirt. JMO

I`ve used option #2 on both of mine
 

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99flhr...Thanks, that what just what I was looking for!

LilysDad...Thanks for your whole post!:eek:)
 

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99flhr has provided the part numbers for what is called "poor man's power steering". I have only used the bearing type but I have a pair of the bronze bearings in my parts stash. I will say that the needle bearing type will get dirt in them and need to be kept clean and lubed. I have only mowed and moved snow with my Ingersolls.
I like the theory of the bronze bearings and I would not grease them, just let the graphite inserts in the bearing do their job.
Every 4000 series Ingersoll that I have removed the steering spindles from had incorrectly welded arms. The arms were not at 90 degrees to the spindle and this causes a high spot and the needle bearings that I initially installed on my 4018 cracked due to the high spot. I had to file the arms to bring the bearing surface as close to 90 degrees as possible and then replace the bearings.
I have not found a 400 series tractor with the same problem. I did run into a 400 series tractor that had 4000 series spindles and they had high spots.
Bob MacGregor in CT:D:bump9:
 

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Hi,

I'm making the assumption that you're talking about a thrust bearing that would be placed on the spindle and below the front axle.

Is that correct?

chuckbob
 

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Hi,

I'm making the assumption that you're talking about a thrust bearing that would be placed on the spindle and below the front axle.

Is that correct?

chuckbob
Yes, and if you retain the stock steel washers you`ll reduce the gap/slop below the snap ring at the top of the upright.
 

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bob, mad mac.
my 82 448 and 83 444 spindles were SOOO bad that Helen Keller
could have done them better

i had them machined to be at 90 degrees.
had this not been done the races would have failed.
thank you boomer. (the used onan engine parts guy)
 

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Hi Boomer,
Ingersoll must have had some bad welders and or bad jigs. My late 1984 built 448 spindles were dead on at 90 degrees. But my 1989 4018 was way off, but not anymore. My lathe just wasn't big enough to swing them so I did them by hand with a flat file that has smooth small sides. Took a while to do.
Mad Mackie in CT
 

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I was just remembering some talk a few years ago, about using needle bearings(?) to make steering easier. I can't find anything about it now. Do any of you know what was used, where they were purchased, and if any of you tried it...how well did it work and hold up?

I am considering a small front bucket, and just thought this might be worth investigating.

Any information would be appreciated.
Below is the link to the page at McMaster-Carr

http://www.mcmaster.com/#needle-roller-thrust-bearings/=ed3s5s
 
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