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Hmm, in the 14 years I had Deere machines, I have never lost a single one of those pins. My X300 had at least 4 of them and it has been through much thick stuff. I have lost a few of the more standard locking R pins. They are much easier to remove. That is great when you want to remove them, not so great when you really need them to stay in place.
May you loose 5 this year.....lol


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I don't know how some are losing so many. I've never had one come off. Misplacing I could see. The other is worn out and or bent or loose. Last is operator error.
 

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Yes. They're called cotter pins

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Why didn't I mention that? :D

I went to 3/16" cotter pins in my loader and sleeve hitch and haven't lost one since.
 
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I don't know how some are losing so many. I've never had one come off. Misplacing I could see. The other is worn out and or bent or loose. Last is operator error.
I'd drag them off in brush.
 
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In the shop we always called them Jesus clips, because of what was said when one launches itself to who knows where.
That what we Call Snap rings, Jesus clips (y)
 

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I studied the photo from the first post and even looked at the photos from McMaster Carr showing them installed and for the life of me, I can't see how they can be easily installed. I have never seen that type of clip before today. It looks to me like something that is specifically designed to hurt your fingers getting them on and off. I have a 40 plus year old tractor that I have bought new, and I truly believe that all the R clips on it are original.
 

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They are pretty straightforward to install/remove.

They go on a round post, that is smaller in diameter than the round part of the clip, with a hole near the end of the post, that is a bit larger than the diameter of the wire, and you slide the center pin of the clip into the hole, with the "top" of the pin (as pictured in post #1) facing towards the attached end of the post, until the post is centered in the round section of the clip.

To remove, you pull on the bent section of the clip (on the right side of the clip as pictured in #1), so the round part on that side clears the end of the post, then you slide it off the post.

As for losing them, I haven't yet, but the only spot where they are used (near the control levers on my Snapper hydro walkbehind), they don't come in contact with bushes/tree branches very often. I semi-regularly lose R-clips and lynch pins on it, but those do come in contact with bushes/tree branches.
 

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I studied the photo from the first post and even looked at the photos from McMaster Carr showing them installed and for the life of me, I can't see how they can be easily installed. I have never seen that type of clip before today. It looks to me like something that is specifically designed to hurt your fingers getting them on and off. I have a 40 plus year old tractor that I have bought new, and I truly believe that all the R clips on it are original.
They didn't Make these when You 316 Kohler Came out
when they get a Bit Mangled there not nice to deal with
Deere started Using them On the X300 & X500 series with the Mowing deck's for Mounting I replaced them On all My Friends X540 back to the Older R clips . I personally don't Like these New clips if the circle piece get Mangled they can be hard to get on and off (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Bought 4 at the dealer for $0.85

I'm sure I'll find the 2 missing ones when I put the deck on but what the heck.

Went in for $3 worth of clips, came out $500 lighter with a new stihl ms250, a gallon of fuel and chaps.

My first chainsaw. Now I have to find mychainsawforum.com and bother them to death. So many maintenence questions.

Here we go again
 

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I just bought the MS251 CBE. I have had an MS180CBE for 11 years. The carb acted up last year and I replaced it with a cheap one that is now acting up.

Chainsaws require a healthy dose of respect, because they can cause serious bodily harm. Lots of people use them every day without incident. But, I suspect that you really don't want to be one of the ones that have/cause an issue.

The MS250 is a classic design that a lot of people love. I picked the MS251CBE because it is cleaner burning (I don't like the smell of most 2cycle engines) and has the easy2start system. It is noticably heavier than my MS180 (only supposed to be a pound heavier), but still easy enough to use. It has a lot more power and 4" longer bar, which came in handy for the downed Hemlock that really needed a longer bar for the last 20-30 feet of trunk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I just bought the MS251 CBE. I have had an MS180CBE for 11 years. The carb acted up last year and I replaced it with a cheap one that is now acting up.

Chainsaws require a healthy dose of respect, because they can cause serious bodily harm. Lots of people use them every day without incident. But, I suspect that you really don't want to be one of the ones that have/cause an issue.

The MS250 is a classic design that a lot of people love. I picked the MS251CBE because it is cleaner burning (I don't like the smell of most 2cycle engines) and has the easy2start system. It is noticably heavier than my MS180 (only supposed to be a pound heavier), but still easy enough to use. It has a lot more power and 4" longer bar, which came in handy for the downed Hemlock that really needed a longer bar for the last 20-30 feet of trunk.
congrats!

Yea i took some limbs off as soon as i got home to test the power and I like it. I just had 5 big tress felled last week. Needed something to clean up the property, keep pruning and learn on. I suppose like everyone i will have another saw at some point. This seemed lke a good all rounder to get started, my budget was $400 but that included safety equipment.

18' bar. Just need to learn the proper cleaning care after every use and im definitely using the prmix fuel for as much use as it will see, it just makes sense.
 

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More chainsaw talk goes here:

My brother, who lives in the city and has one big tree, has the Farm boss (MS270/1). I, who live in a rural area on 10 wooden acres, bought the baby chainsaw. I did that to keep reminding myself to stay within the limits of my capabilities. I hire trained professionals when anything major needs to come down. They have some amazing skills (and some seem to have a need for adrenaline, climbing a 100 foot high tree and cutting it down must provide a little).
 

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John Deere makes a cotter pin that looks like that. it looks as useless as joe biden
View attachment 2493757


I looked online for 30 min and could not describe a search term to bring up anything. All i was able to get is this which is deemed "snapper cotter pin" because it goes with a Snapper product.

Was in TSC today and they didn't have any, guy tried to help, said he has seen them before but no idea where to source.

I'm not even sure they're necessary. Lost a bunch. First 2 were for the front retaining bracket that attaches to JD mower deck to hold the deck up, I know you know what I'm talking about. You remove them from the front bracket where it attaches to the frame every time you take the deck off.

Others were for my Johnny bucket and plow. Now I'm sure a clevis pin would work and yea I could get the part from a deere dealer for 100% markup but if I wanted to replace them with the same style what in the heck do I search for?
 

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calls it a Cotter Pin, Self-locking

I would probably buy some for stuff I repair/make, but nobody locally has them. I generally use an R-clip/R-pin instead (for holes up to about 1/8" or so)
I found them in a couple of places that were not selling them as replacement parts for specific equipment. MSC, the giant industrial machine tool supply calls them "sure lock cotter pins" and lists several sizes in their catalog.Then I found them on Amazon, sold by Ried Supply, who calls them 'automatic locking cotter pins''. Both are selling them as generic or house brand items so there is no brand name but that is true of most similar types of clips. Somebody was selling the JD clips for $.98 , which didn't seem too bad if you just need a couple. Ried was asking $.48 but I didn't check the size or see what they stock. I think MSC might only be selling bags of 100. Now you have a couple of names for them but you checked all the local suspects and if you have to order them online shipping cost will probably be the deciding factor. If you bring up the MSC catalog page, there was another security type pin listed next to this one. It worked like a safety pin. That might work for you. The way I found it was by googling "clevis pin clip images' and "hitch pin clip images" when I found the right image I just clicked on it. That got around not knowing what to call it. Good Luck.
 

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So glad you all can find them at your dealer. Mine couldn't find sand at the beach let alone a locking cotter pin.
Man, that’s too bad. My local dealer can always find things, but aren’t always the lowest price, but then, the shipping can offset the difference. Even their used equipment prices are better than many places.
 
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