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If you got it from Isavetractors...just call Norman...he answers the phone..or calls back...or you can email him...you can find out if you did order original from him...and talk about what happened...see if he has a reasonable solution...his # is on his website if you need it PM me and I will give it to you...good luck
 

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There where a few minor scuffs on the crank where the connecting rod attaches to the crank (do not know term) but I ever so lightly wore those down to the point where I believe they would not be an issue.
Umm... exactly how did you accomplish this? You cannot just "wear down" a few spots on a crank journal, they need to be perfectly round. They also require a certain finish, they should be "polished" after any work is done on them.
 

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Any journal can be taken down and polished by hand. It does help if the crank can continuously be rotated. I have done it to a few B&S with aluminum rods that left rod material on the crank. It takes lots of patience and measuring.
 

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My concern was he did not measure afterwards and may have created flat spots, that's all. I'm aware you can polish them by hand. I've also "machined" a cylinder head from a 50 HP outboard engine by taping sandpaper to a flat piece of glass and working it in small circles. Came out great, ran fine til I sold it.
 

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Do you have Kohler Service manual?
Get one if the answer is no? The Kohler has a section on how to rebuild an engine.
Another thing to do is to find someone that has rebuild Kohler K series engines to help you.
I be happy to help you if you live near me.
 

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Connecting rod & rod cap don't match??? 1980 Ingersoll Rand 185/170?? CFM Gas Air Compressor idiot bypassed low oil shutdown switch. Dropped piston & rod out the bottom one at a time, marked connecting rod & bearing caps as I took them out. Berry treed the cyl, put in new standard rings & standard rod bearings. Emery clothed the rod journals (had bearing jiz burnt in) using 120 grit progressing to 600 grit. Put engine assembly lube on connecting rod bearings & oil on new rings. Torqued to spec. Turned crank by hand to do the next.
 

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I am learning as I go here.

Quick version:

LGT 16
Do I need to file/sand big end of connecting rod to move freely on crank? I've torqued rod bolts and now the crank will not budge.

Long Version:

I am on my second - soon to be third I believe - connecting rod in my Ford LGT16. The first rod I replaced - I torqued the replacement rod on the crankshaft with the crankshaft in a vise and only then wondered how I was going to get the assembly in the engine. 😁

So after taking it all apart and re-torquing bolts and reassembly - engine ran from my barn to about half way down the drive. Those 9 seconds were very proud seconds. The instructions were to NOT torque and re-torque rod bolts so I am guessing that was the cause of the second rod shattering.

Having 'fixed' this once I figured I could learn on my mistakes and try another rod. This is where I am now. Having done everything 'correctly' this time - I am now wondering why the rod/piston will not move.

I did have to slightly file down the piston end of the rod for it fit in the old piston and move freely but I did not think to check the big end/crank end.

So I am basically back to where I started a year ago. While I have the momentum with this project I thought I'd ask around. I found many posts with connecting rod related questions but not this one.

Thanks,

jw
I rebuilt a Kohler 10 horse, and had the same experience, it ran for about half a minute then stopped. I found out from a mechanic friend that just oiling the crankshaft before assembling the rod isnt sufficient. He said to go to the parts house and buy a bottle of assembly grease (it clings and will lube longer),use that to lube every moving part while assembling. The engine has a "splash" oil system, and at first startup, the oil can't lube quick enough and the engine will seize up. One new rod and piston pin later, put it back together after emery papering the crank (Very Lightly, with very fine emery paper), It ran perfectly and no issues, Hope this helps.!
 

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I admit I did not read all the posts but my first thoughts were was it a standard size crank and an undersize rod, was the cap installed correctly or was it reversed on the rod, was the rod installed in the correct direction so the oil was splashed in the lub hole, also was a short dipper stick rod installed where a long dipper stick rod was needed???
 

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I've used stuff like STP or Motor Medic ,the thick stuff used to reduce oil burning in worn engines when I assemble an engine,especially a splash lube one..once all I had handy was some camshaft lube you put on the lobes when installing a new camshaft and that worked well also..
 

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Your best friend at this time is a micrometer, measure OD of the journal and ID of the big end of the rod, you should never have to file/sand any internal engine part to fit, if it binds in the piston then, given the piston came out of your engine, the rod is wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I rebuilt a Kohler 10 horse, and had the same experience, it ran for about half a minute then stopped. I found out from a mechanic friend that just oiling the crankshaft before assembling the rod isnt sufficient. He said to go to the parts house and buy a bottle of assembly grease (it clings and will lube longer),use that to lube every moving part while assembling. The engine has a "splash" oil system, and at first startup, the oil can't lube quick enough and the engine will seize up. One new rod and piston pin later, put it back together after emery papering the crank (Very Lightly, with very fine emery paper), It ran perfectly and no issues, Hope this helps.!
Thanks Rich. I have added assembly grease (first time hearing of it) to my to-town list of things to buy. And I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who went the emery route.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I admit I did not read all the posts but my first thoughts were was it a standard size crank and an undersize rod, was the cap installed correctly or was it reversed on the rod, was the rod installed in the correct direction so the oil was splashed in the lub hole, also was a short dipper stick rod installed where a long dipper stick rod was needed???
The latest rod seemed to fit much better and I did apply some standard oil to fittings before assembling but I am going to try to pick up some assembly grease as mentioned above.

Dipper sticks look right.

The piston had directional arrows -> Flywheel which helped me install that correctly - but will have to go back and double check oil hole now - thanks for the reminder.
 

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I am learning as I go here.

Quick version:

LGT 16
Do I need to file/sand big end of connecting rod to move freely on crank? I've torqued rod bolts and now the crank will not budge.

Long Version:

I am on my second - soon to be third I believe - connecting rod in my Ford LGT16. The first rod I replaced - I torqued the replacement rod on the crankshaft with the crankshaft in a vise and only then wondered how I was going to get the assembly in the engine. 😁

So after taking it all apart and re-torquing bolts and reassembly - engine ran from my barn to about half way down the drive. Those 9 seconds were very proud seconds. The instructions were to NOT torque and re-torque rod bolts so I am guessing that was the cause of the second rod shattering.

Having 'fixed' this once I figured I could learn on my mistakes and try another rod. This is where I am now. Having done everything 'correctly' this time - I am now wondering why the rod/piston will not move.

I did have to slightly file down the piston end of the rod for it fit in the old piston and move freely but I did not think to check the big end/crank end.

So I am basically back to where I started a year ago. While I have the momentum with this project I thought I'd ask around. I found many posts with connecting rod related questions but not this one.

Thanks,

jw
I didn't see if anyone addressed this but make sure you didn't flip the rod cap 180 degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
UPDATE:

Well here is where I am at now - I took much of the advice offered here and purchased a few items to help me sort through this which include the inch lb breaker bar, (which only goes up to 200 in/lb and specs call for 300 in/lb :oops:) a digital slide vernier (which I still want to call a digital caliper) and I have the assembly oil arriving in the mail any day now. The last time I reassembled this I also bought the tool to correctly align the crankshaft and balance gears.

I assembled and re assembled the connecting rod several times trying to orient the oil hole properly but finally just took note of which side I put it on and continued on assembling. Much of the information I found online or in the manual was either conflicting or at best confusing.

2455974

I am not sure I ever found these 'marks' but and the way the highlighted part reads was confusing to me as these parts seem to run parallel to each other. I am guessing that this means closest to bearing plate opposed to furthest away. And I do not see an oil hole in the illustration so I am going with oil hole to the right. I later found one of the isavetractor (IST) videos that seemed to confirm this.

Got everything back together and set points to .020 which roughly translated to points closing at T top dead center on flywheel and figured it would be good enough for a test run.

A can of starter fluid later and I had her going again. Purring like a kitten. Wife and son gave me thumbs up as I took my victory lap along the driveway. Mower deck raised/lowered. Then I hit the pto switch and heard the engine bog and belt squeal so I quickly turned it off. Hopped off to check belts - realigned belts - hit switch again it was all over.

I remember hearing distinct noises the last two times it threw a rod but I didn't hear that this time. Was going to park it for the summer and revisit in the fall/winter but by that time, and like the last time, I forgot all the details and intricacies of small engine repair so I tore it all back apart and snapped some photos.

2455975


And this is how the crankshaft looked and measured.
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So now I revisit to the IST ordering page to mull over buying yet another rod and see 3 options: STD .010 .020 for part number CON01007 (link may not work but search that number and part will pull up) which I do not recall seeing last time but who knows. Going back to my order I cannot distinguish which one I ordered so I have reached out to Norman through the websites 'contact us'. I also asked him to take a look here if he had the time.

I believe those scuffs on the crank are from the aluminum rod and were what I originally started this thread for. Last time I gently wore them down/off with emery cloth and thinking back might have labeled the thread incorrectly. I would not jeopardize the cranks specifications but I would/did remove the markings left from crank.

I swore off putting any more money in to this project but yea, that never works. Now I am thinking of making her a 'puller :love:

Link to LGT Manual in case anyone is looking for it:


Any ideas are appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Norman from IST got back to me almost immediately and had some ideas on what to try next. I am ordering a micrometer and going to clean the crankshaft with oven cleaner and a scotchpad and see where I am at then per his instructions.

I will have to check my notes but I may had the oil hole on the wrong side...
 
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