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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had recently got my rear tires filled on my 2544, AF/H2O. It's been so wet here I haven't really got a chance to try it out much with the tires. I started down a longish grade, about 200 ft, that goes down at 27 deg. Here's what scared me... The tractor slid all the way down and it wasn't a good feeling. The tires were rolling too, they weren't locked up as I would have expected if I was skidding down. Would the additional weight in my tires cause the brakes to need worked on? I believe that the tires weigh around 80lbs each now, added to the weight of the mower and my 200lbs, that's over 1100lbs trying to stay in control down hill with a turn at the bottom I must make or else, no escape ramp let it roll straight type thing....

Another question, is it possible to "upgrade" the brakes, I have been reading and saw that old IH cubs had wheel disc brakes, like cars?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well before the filled tires I could get the wheels to lock going down hill and a somewhat controlled skid, now they just turn and turn like your statement "brakes???"
 

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Hey gcbailey.

Looks like the quest continues to get those inverted bowls mowed, eh? Did you find any 4-lug spacers yet?

More weight on the tractor is going to equal more force pulling you downhill so indeed it will work your brakes more, or, as Scott said, use reverse as a power brake.

How about one of these? Remote controlled, has tank treads, and it can do 70 degree slopes!

And just think... it's only $12k!

 

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There is a procedure for adjusting the brakes in the owners manual, but I have never tried it.

The brakes on these things are pretty tiny. The brakes on the older Cubs were much bigger - I wonder how much better they worked.
 

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Brakes on a hydrostatic drive machine (like the 2K series) are intended for parking brake use only. Thus, the high and out of the way position of the pedal. Nothing is going to keep you from sliding down a steep grade.

Joel
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I didn't know if using reverse would be hard on the transmission or not, by the wheels rolling forward and then trying to slap them in reverse.

@ Toolin - the ballast in the tires has made a huge difference in lowering the cog, this issue now is in my neighbors yard adjacent to mine. Surprisingly to me it comes up and out with the weighted tires like nothing, even with a little dew, it's the going down part now that worries :)
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So I'm guessing by the comments so far that the brake thing is a no go. I guess in the fall I can start piling all the leave and grass clippings to be a buffer :)
 

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I guess in the fall I can start piling all the leave and grass clippings to be a buffer :)
Just put up that big safety net at the bottom of the hill like I mentioned in your ROPS post... will help catch the kids too if they start rolling out of control.:ROF

If this is a hydrostatic drive unit, I'm surprised it will let the wheels turn at all except under it's own power. Basically with the drive pedal in the neutral position, it should be effectively locking up the wheels where the only slip possible would be tires slipping on grass, yet you said the wheels do turn as you uncontrollably slip down the hill.

I wonder if there is some fluid blow-by going on, or some kind of clutch built in somewhere. I don't know the 2000 series very well (ok, at all).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not a great mechanic myself, just the IT guy, but the wheels where definitely rolling, not at the speed I was traveling, but they were rolling.
 

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My friend has a lil hill like yours and he utilizes tire chains (no loading of tires)which have a lil more bite than tire tread and he walks up and down the thing no problem! Try that out! (Or you can get a ride like "Toolin's" above!!) Good Luck!
 

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It won't hurt your tranny a bit to apply just enough reverse to act as a brake. You added weight, just enough weight to render your brakes worthless but NOT ENOUGH weight to plant your tires. Concider a more agressive tread next time and secondly add more weight, much more weight. Get you a weight bracket and add about 250lbs. Drive up your hill from the bottom and u turn and drive down in increments, don't start at the top, see how she goes first.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have thought about ag tires, but a little confused at the diameter. The stock tires are 23X9.5 on ebay all that I see are 23x10.5. I don't know if that extra width will rub the deck on the mine (2544 w/44" deck).

So I need to add more weight to cause my tractor to go down the hill slower? What about adding weight to the front, I'm afraid if I put everything in the back, I'm going to get lift off and flip backwards, this section of yard is between 25~27 degrees and exactly 196' long. I got bored and measured tonight. I read in another post that someone wrapped chain around their front bumper, good idea or not?

It's funny I had a decent size thread going in the attachment section wanting to put some type of a rops on my tractor. I got that problem fixed, now I just can't stop :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would think that added weight would cause the tractor to pick up momentum and roll faster, but you're saying it will keep it grounded and not be as likely to roll?
 

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I'm in the mountains here in E TN and I have the same terrain you do, my whole property is on a steep hill. My 1811 that I mow with is about the same size and weight as yours and my rears are loaded All Trails and I rarely have an issue going down hill. Some of the more steep areas when wet will allow me to slip a little. My Supers are weighted very well, loaded Tru-powers, wheel weights, cast iron rear, and especially with a box or tiller on the back they are planted, never a problem.

It's all about the weight.

Scott
 

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Interesting, I did not know that about the brakes, jmoe. I imagine the larger brakes that I have seen on older tractors were on non-hydro units, which would make sense.

I have experienced the same thing descending sharper inclines. In my case traction is not a problem as the tires never slide, they just never stop turning – now I know why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I guess I'll look for a weight bracket. On cub's website for the 2500 series they list front/rear bracket, but no tire weights. The 1500 series which isn't shaft drive, and has aluminum rear end, not cast iron list wheel weights. The tires on the GT1554 are 23x10.5 instead of 23X9.5 does that make sense?
 

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The other thing to consider is the OEM tires. There isn't a whole lot of tread depth on them to bite on loose ground. A set of ag style treads and the right amount of weight for you conditions would do the trick. If not? A nice compact diesel 4x4 is in order! :00000060:

Joel
 
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