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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been following this thread about using a disc harrow to slice up ice, and became very jelous that I didn't have a disc harrow, or even a drag harrow. So here's my question, how do you build one and which is better?
 

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Apples and Rhutabagas. Disc Harrow has cutting edges (discs) which slice up the soil and provide some leveling. Drag Harrows can vary from a simple frame rectangular or triangle with weight to level out "tilled" ground. To a metal frame with teeth which can be adjusted to dig deep or shallow into tilled ground to accomplish the same thing.

Building a discharrow would be almost impossible IMHO, a "drag" can be made easily out of some heavy lumber and a chain. I made one a while back just to "drag" over my gravel driveway to level it out.

If memory serves, the old farmers used to use a trangular shaped (apex towards the drawbar) drag for better leveling action. You'll also hear about "spike" harrows which are what I just described with heavy (3/4"x3/4"x10") spikes projecting through and into the ground. They were popular back in the days of horses.....:)

Here's a photo of a disc harrow FYI.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-16X16-3...501?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item588e4e4a1d

Good luck,

Ev
 

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Sears Spike tooth harrow


Sears Disk Harrow

I have seen people make drag harrows out of almost anything- even a section of chain link fence with cinde rblocks on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On the disc harrows, do the discs wear out? If so, can you find replacements? If there are replacement discs easily obtainable, then I don't think it should be too hard to build the harrow. My reason for wanting a disc harrow is that it seems that it is more capable at breaking up hard soil. The rural areas near where I live, from what I can tell, most, if not all farmers use disc harrows, that is why I'm quite interested in building one.

Growing up, my father used a wood crate with weight on it pulled behind a fourwheeler to level the dirt before planing grass. I think this fits the term "drag harrow." If he'd wanted deeper penetration, he could have driven large nails into it, correct?
 

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Tractor Supply sells replacement discs. I'm sure other farm supply houses do, as well.

The worst part would be buying the bearings and making up the hubs and axles. The bearings would need to be sealed or somehow protected from the dirt since they live right down there in the stuff.
 

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Sears Spike tooth harrow


Sears Disk Harrow

I have seen people make drag harrows out of almost anything- even a section of chain link fence with cinde rblocks on it.
Leave off the cinderblocks on the chain link fence and drag it over a fresh seed bed after you've scattered the grass seed and it does a great job of covering it, but not too deep. Done that often

Ev
 

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It depends on what your doing. When I was growing up(Before the advent of NO TILL). It was a 3 or 4 step process to till a field for planting.
1)A plow turned over the soil,leaving a very rough cloddy field rough to drive over.
2) A Disc Harrow was used to cut down the clods and start breaking them and smothing the field. Depending on soil condition and equipment on may have to run one direction, then across and sometimes diagonally.
3) A spike Harrow was then used to further level and break up the clods.
4)After planting a crop that was not a row crop, after seeding the spike harrow was used to lightly cover the seed to promote germination.
This 4th step today is often done today by a cultipacker. I never saw a Cultipacer used in Iowa untill the late 70's early 80's.

The two types of Harrow, each served a purpose specific to it's design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I've seen newer disc harrows, like this one at Home Depot, but I'm not a fan of the tow behind option. It looks like I may go for the drag harrow (home built, of course) until I can find an older Sears disc harrow. Thanks for all the help!
 

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I agree. The disc for chopping in stuff like leaves and clods. But the spike is only good if there are no leaves or clods. It will plug up the drag if that stuff's there. The spike drag is like the final dressing but the dirt has to be clean. The plow combined with the rototiller is the best combination imo.
 

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On the disc harrows, do the discs wear out? If so, can you find replacements? If there are replacement discs easily obtainable, then I don't think it should be too hard to build the harrow. My reason for wanting a disc harrow is that it seems that it is more capable at breaking up hard soil. The rural areas near where I live, from what I can tell, most, if not all farmers use disc harrows, that is why I'm quite interested in building one.

Growing up, my father used a wood crate with weight on it pulled behind a fourwheeler to level the dirt before planing grass. I think this fits the term "drag harrow." If he'd wanted deeper penetration, he could have driven large nails into it, correct?
If I remember, the discs were made by Ingersoll. You will have to find a really good parts dealer who can tell you if they can order you replacement discs. I spoke with a factory rep years ago and he said they still made a disc the same diameter but I could not find a single parts supplier willing to order them. I don't think Ingersoll still makes the same size discs now but there are other companies that might.

:howdy:

:dunno:

:MTF_wel2:
 

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Yes over the corse of years the discs do wear down, and any good farm supply does have replacements. Buying or building the axles and spacing spools(between the discs) would be a very expensive proposition.
The discs tend to round over and not be sharp to cut the clods.
Back in the mid 60's my dad had a disc sharpener.
It was a long trailer set up like a lathe and had an 8 hp Briggs & stratton motor. The Sections were dropped out of the disc frame(my Job) and then mounted between centers in the trailer frame.
Then a large tool holder was set on the lower tube of the sharpener frame and clamped down on the edge of the disc and a new cutting edge cut on the disc.

Incidently in my area a Disc Harrow is simply a "Disc" and a Drag Harrow is simply called a "Harrow".
 

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i took an agrifab sleeve hitch disc and put a 24" tongue on it and it is now a pull behind yeah it's always on the ground but it works for now until i can find some more parts to build a lifting device and wheels
 

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and is that an ice cream maker as your avatar pic?
 

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It does look like an ice cream maker! What kind of motor or thing is that on top? It almost looks like an old milling machine or a drill press. Help us out here. Maybe some additional pictures from the side. At least an explanation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is an Ice cream maker. I had the custard all made up, the ice packed around, and when I plugged it in, it twitched, and then nothing. Being a ******* engineer, Took the top off the motor, removed the fan from the motor shaft, chucked it up in my fathers small drill press (that I happen to be borrowing on a temporary, may not be returned, case), and viola, it worked! Only problem with the setup is that it spins at about a third the speed as before, and in the wrong direction.

I have since corrected the problem by adding a pully directly to the motor shaft of the ice cream maker, flipping the drillpress motor over and running it that way. One thing to note is that the 1/4 h.p. motor is a lot stronger than the original motor, and so when the ice cream is done churning, you won't know it, except for the fact that it comes out of the can. With the original motor, it would stall when it was done churning. This arrangement is also a lot quieter, and allows my wife and I to make ice cream while the kids are in bed, without them knowing or waking up!
 

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Does your father know you have his drill press? Does he know it will NOT be returned? It was probably your father that taught you the stealth of making treats quietly. Probably how you got his drill press too!
 
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