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Discussion Starter #1
I just attempted to let just a little air out of my rear tires on Kubota L4610 to maybe soften the ride and improve traction in sand. With the stems at 12:00, I pressed the little Shroeder check valve thing. I expected CaCl, but was greeted by a kind of yucky brown frothy liquid. Not really salty tasting, but almost more like a spoiled marinade for steak. Rimguard or something else?
 

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Well, let's see. Rim Guard is beet juice, kind of a reddish color. Then there is likely no telling how clean the rim was when the fluid was put in there nor how long it has been gaining the delicious flavors and colors of rubber & rust.

BTW: It's a Schrader valve, sometimes known as an American valve, invented by August Schrader in 1891. Not to be confused with the Presta valve or European valve.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, let's see. Rim Guard is beet juice, kind of a reddish color. Then there is likely no telling how clean the rim was when the fluid was put in there nor how long it has been gaining the delicious flavors and colors of rubber & rust.

BTW: It's a Schrader valve, sometimes known as an American valve, invented by August Schrader in 1891. Not to be confused with the Presta valve or European valve.
Well, I guess it was a dark reddish, like I say a brown color. Didn’t up and stink, but not like fresh beet juice, either.
Maybe it is Rimguard then.
 

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If it's brown (not from rust) and a bit sticky, it's Rim Guard.

CaCl is also brown (due to rust) and a bit sticky, but it is pucker-up-the-lips bitter. (Learned this as a kid when they used to spread CaCl crystals on the road for dust control.)

Use one of these to check the pressure of loaded tires. It keeps the fluid away from the gauge so that it doesn't get gummed up. Keep an old valve stem handy to blow the fluid back out of the hose when you're done.

I prefer to measure from the ground to the top of the rim when I first install the tires. If the pressure was right at first installation, the same measurement will indicate the same pressure later. For my 26x12-12 turfs, that's 19.25" for 14 psi. A 1 psi pressure change will change the ground to top of rim measurement about 1/4".

Note that all tires with the same nominal size are not necessarily the same diameter under pressure. Check the tires that you are installing for the correct measurement. You want the same measurement for both rear tires so that the axle is level. The pressure is irrelevant as long as one of them is correct for your purpose.
 

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You tasted it...? :ROF
I do this regularly, much to the amusement of my friends and neighbors.
 

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could be Worcestershire sauce with a splash of balsamic, but definitely sounds more like rimgaurd. 99 percent certain
 

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Don’t air down too much. I actually got stuck once because my ag tire stayed put while the rim spun inside of it due to lack of air pressure. I’m guessing that stuff has some lubricant properties.
 

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Sounds like rim guard to me... But I can't say I've tasted it....
 

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Given the same circumstances I would have tasted it.
Got to be sure of what yur dealing with, before you try to deal with it.

But then the proverbial expression, curiosity killed the cat, comes to mind.

Let your wife know your MTF password just in case.
No wait, bad idea. :Stop: Scratch that.
 

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Rimguard is not beet juice. It is a liquid by-product of the process that extracts sugar from beets to make beet sugar, so it should have almost no sugar in it, and shouldn't taste sweet. That is an assumption, not knowledge gained from any actual tasting, but if the process it intended to extract the sugar from the beets, then any by-product shouldn't have much sugar left in it or they would find a more efficient process.
 

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Steddy, I think if you make a habit of tasting everything you run into you should make sure your will is up to date.
I won't disparage your intelligence bu saying the things I did to my wife when she told me she had tasted a strange white powder she found in her luggage when she went to Puerto Rico last year.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I probably shouldn't mention that I'm the "environmental guy" at our shop, and people often bring unlabled chemicals to me for disposal (I work in composites manufacturing). They need to be identified prior to catalyzing or proper disposal.

No, I don't taste them. That'd literally be deadly in many cases. Dimethylanaline is some nasty stuff (active ingredient in moth balls).

Most of the time chemical profiling is the preferred means if identification. I didn't think it'd be worth it in the instance of mystery tire juice. I figured the few choices would be rim guard, CaCl, antifreeze, or washer fluid. A touch to the tongue with a fingertip with any of the aforementioned wheel fluids wouldn't even make a person sick.
 
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