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Hair dryer!

Also, without going back and reading the whole thread, is there heat in the room? I know the temp is lower than the rest of the house, but if it was even cooler there would be less condensation.
 

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What's a tiny bit of ice buildup going to do?
Pretty much the gist of this thread is operating a dehumidifier at temps below what it should be operating at. Bring the entire unit into a warm room and allow to thaw, then clean the filter and the coils. A soft brush & compressed air and/or the use of a cleaner like Simple Green will work. Dry thoroughly and use.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
What's a tiny bit of ice buildup going to do?
Pretty much the gist of this thread is operating a dehumidifier at temps below what it should be operating at. Bring the entire unit into a warm room and allow to thaw, then clean the filter and the coils. A soft brush & compressed air and/or the use of a cleaner like Simple Green will work. Dry thoroughly and use.
Yup.
 

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I played around with this in my basement. It was never wet.... but got real damp at different times of the year. If you cant vent it more, you need to add some heat to the room. Also get the air moving. A small heater with a fan will help that, as will the dehumidifier when its thawed. it takes the longest to just get ahead of the dampness. Once you get some temps up, and start pulling the humidity down it will be less effort. Also I didnt see if your humidafyer had a humidastat.. If so dont crank it to max right away. work up to it, so the unit shuts off once in a while. If it doesnt let it rest a bit every few hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I played around with this in my basement. It was never wet.... but got real damp at different times of the year. If you cant vent it more, you need to add some heat to the room. Also get the air moving. A small heater with a fan will help that, as will the dehumidifier when its thawed. it takes the longest to just get ahead of the dampness. Once you get some temps up, and start pulling the humidity down it will be less effort. Also I didnt see if your humidafyer had a humidastat.. If so dont crank it to max right away. work up to it, so the unit shuts off once in a while. If it doesnt let it rest a bit every few hours.
Yeah, it has a humidistat. It was set to maybe 40% of max power, but maybe that was just too much to ask of it in the PTO cold temperature.

Thanks to all for all the good advice. I'm learning a lot!
 

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steddy, you should probably get a hygrometer, or two, to use in and around your home year round. That way you know what your normal humidity is inside and outside your house and if you should do something about it. It gets a tad humid where I live and I've found that an everyday activity I do becomes much harder to almost impossible if the humidity is over 70%.
Here is a good guide for you to look at:

 

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In this area, an HRV is commonly used to reduce humidity and is a code requirement. The HRV removes too much humidity in Winter due to the dry outside air so we also use a furnace mounted humidifier to mitigate it.

Simple ventilation (without heat recovery) is another way to control humidity and is a code requirement for crawlspaces but that is not practical. In Summer, it raises the humidity and in Winter, it lets in too much cold. One way to get around the code is to make the crawlspace part of the home's conditioned space which is what I did on my current home.

Another code requirement is to provide outside makeup air to the home. This is often ducted into the cold air return of the furnace but can be dumped directly into a room instead.
 

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Had no idea of your acronym for Heat Recovery Ventilator was until I Duck Duck Go'ed it. Not code down thisaways, but we don't need it.
 

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A variation on the HRV is the ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilator). They also recover some of the humidity.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I just put a thermometer in there with the probulator thing about 1/2 way between the floor and ceiling. About 65 degrees about 15 minutes after turning down the T-stat on the heater until it clicked off. There’s a max/min temperature readout built into the thermometer so I can gauge where the average might be.

It’ll be fun getting this process all dialed in before finishing the walls and ceiling in the room!
 

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A variation on the HRV is the ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilator). They also recover some of the humidity.
This is one of those conversations that highlights the differences between where you live and where I live. There is no possible way I could even afford a $30,000 ERV to install with my heat pump, nor much need for it as my house is NOT highly and tightly insulated. We simply do not have that need here.
 

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based on all the input above. . .
For now: Your dehumidifier is running normally.
-- defrost that thing, using comp. air blow it clean, that's enough, oil??. . . uh, no.
-- raise it up about 2 ft, add small fan to the room, and a small infra red heater.
-- Let them all run for a day or two and measure humidity before starting and after.
-- Report in.

-- For next winter: install a small opening in the room(leading to adjacent room) and place a tiny DC computer fan in the hole(3 or 4" square), 12 v DC with flow INTO the room; place another small hole, similar size in far end of the room-- again, leading to another room or the same adjacent room. The idea here is to move air from rooms adjacent where you have no problem through this room and back into them, thus, transferring the moist / colder air into a room where you would eventually place the dehumidifier on the floor and let it work normally. Could be, the small amt. of moisture the little fans transfer out will be dissipated by adjacent rooms where you have . . . ventilation?? and there will be no further need for a dehumidifier.

I understand, this is against your rule of having the room "Firesafe". The solution: there are special firestop caulks (intumescent) made for ducts and conduits that expand as fire temperatures heat them. So, just LINE the inside faces of your 2 small holes with this caulk. Google "3M Firestop". typically this expands to 5x its thickness, so if built up to 1/2" thick it would expand to 2.5". A fire would cause expansion enough for a 5" hole.
 

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I figure for the cost of the new dehumidifier I can run that heater for a many years.
Maybe not so many years.

To figure your electrical cost: If your heater is running at the 750 watt level (most are 1500 watts at full power), in one hour it uses .750 kilowatt-hours of electricity. Here in northeast OHio we are paying around $0.13/kwh. So just multiply that out and we get 9.75¢ per hour to run the heater. If you run it for 10 hours per day, (don't forget most of these have a thermostat and will cycle the heating element on and off) that will cost you 97.5¢/day to run - almost a buck a day at our rates. Use your kwh cost to figure your bill.

For the dehumidifier, the nameplate might indicate amps (for example, a 7.5). Simply multiply volts times amps to get watts. In this case, 7.5 x 120 volts = 900 watts or 0.9 kilowatts. Dehumids also cycle the refrigeration unit on and off so calculating this might be a bit difficult. Best thing to do is go to Hopot and buy a little meter called a Kill-a-Watt. I think they cost about $15 and you plug your appliance into the socket on the meter then the meter into the wall and after a few days the gadget will read out your weekly, monthly and yearly electric cost (you input the KWH cost).
 

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Maybe not so many years.

To figure your electrical cost: If your heater is running at the 750 watt level (most are 1500 watts at full power), in one hour it uses .750 kilowatt-hours of electricity. Here in northeast OHio we are paying around $0.13/kwh. So just multiply that out and we get 9.75¢ per hour to run the heater. If you run it for 10 hours per day, (don't forget most of these have a thermostat and will cycle the heating element on and off) that will cost you 97.5¢/day to run - almost a buck a day at our rates. Use your kwh cost to figure your bill.

For the dehumidifier, the nameplate might indicate amps (for example, a 7.5). Simply multiply volts times amps to get watts. In this case, 7.5 x 120 volts = 900 watts or 0.9 kilowatts. Dehumids also cycle the refrigeration unit on and off so calculating this might be a bit difficult. Best thing to do is go to Hopot and buy a little meter called a Kill-a-Watt. I think they cost about $15 and you plug your appliance into the socket on the meter then the meter into the wall and after a few days the gadget will read out your weekly, monthly and yearly electric cost (you input the KWH cost).
You are correct in the not so many years.... but ..... This maybe irrelevant.... If the Dehumidifier he is using will not work below 55 degrees.... He needs heat anyways....

I would have designed the system differently if it was my safe (air exchanger with a fire dampers... etc) ... but electrical cost do not have a relevant value compared to the room conditioning at this point... room conditioning should be a priority if he is storing valuables.. at least it would be for me.....
 

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I did not pick up that this is a gun safe. If it is, he should consider other precautions because moisture and steel equals rust equals damaged/reduced value of the guns. If he has a safe, there is a rod shaped heater - called a Golden Rod (see Cabela's online catalog) that is placed inside the gun safe. I had to install an outlet for a customer who used one many years ago - and I used a hole saw to drill through the wall of the safe (and a plastic grommet) for the cord.

Someone (this OP?) posted a description of a separate room in his basement made of cast concrete for his man cave, and he was going to hang his guns on peg board on the walls. If this is the same OP, he has a moisture problem that will not be solved by a Golden Rod heater.
 

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Yes same OP & basically the entire room is a safe that will also be used for displaying his collections... its not a stand alone gun safe... So the whole room should be conditioned...
 
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