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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #1
I hesitate to start this post of a project that I've postponed for too long - most especially because I know you folks like to see progress reports and you like them frequently. Well, I'm not working at that pace any longer, so you'll have to take them when I get to them.

First my loosely formed plan: My pressure treated deck was built about 27 years ago. I took the time to clean, seal, and stain regularly for the first 20+ years. Then, I let it go a couple years, and couldn't get it as clean first, then it just got out of hand.

Here is a picture from the last time I "successfully" cleaned, stained, and sealed it about 5 years ago:



That was a Cedar shaded stain with sealer in it.

And, unfortunately, a similar angle of how it looked this morning:



This is the north side of my house, and shaded about 80% of the day. Letting it get ahead of me was a mistake. And, at 27 years, the CCA has given up the ghost. My plan is to rip the deck surface off, including railings, benches, facia, steps, down to the substructure. From the underside the substructure looks pretty good, but 27 years ago the deck was nailed down with those galvanized spiral nails, and they just tend to break off, rather than pull. I'm not sure what the tops of the floor joist will look like when I get the deck off. Decisions will be made then. Fingers crossed, most or all of it will pass muster and I'll reuse. But, I plan to use one of the manufactured decking (Trex or TimberTech are top of my list now) and I don't want to invest as much as that will cost only to have substructure failure in 5-10 years under it. We'll see.




This afternoon, once the temps and humidity were both above 90, I started with the railing and built in benches. This is how far I got when Scout who was watching from the shade declared us finished for the day.



All comments always welcome. I'll especially appreciate those indicating I am not working fast enough.
 

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Jere, I appreciate your early quit. I'm in the same area and dealing with the 90 degree weather also. Just finished redoing the front fiberglass door and the necessary painting around the area. Getting too old for this work anymore. I also have to redo my back deck before it gets too bad. I replace the decking about 3 years ago and resealed it 2 years ago. It needs to be pressure washed and then dry and resealed. The rain this year has been awful. I think that I'll get to it soon. (HA Ha) Herb:tango_face_wink:
 

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I "re-decked" my deck 3 years ago. Good thing I did it then as I don't think I could do it anymore. New stairs, decking, and railing. I used treated wood. I have put on a lot of manufactured stuff and I am simply not sold on it. If it is a dark color, you can't stand to walk on it, it gets so hot. The original deck lasted 24 years. That will be more than enough to make it someone elses problem when it needs it again. The most expensive part was the aluminum railing. It cost more than the entire deck did in '92. Like I said, I did it 3 years ago, and have not sealed it yet. Does it need it yet?
 

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Ha Ha....when I read the heading Deck Restore...I thought we were talking about a mower deck!
X2

Jere,

This is one of the handiest tools I have for straitening warped deck boards, one person can use it, and it holds it in place while you screw down the board.

https://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/cepco-bw2?cm_mmc=Bing-_-PRODUCTFEED-_-CEPCO-_-BW2&CAWELAID=600009240000044823&CATARGETID=600009240005366191&CADEVICE=c&msclkid=32e3a7888234188eb2c2fa935e6fcc4a&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=CA Bing Shopping&utm_term=4579053613270773&utm_content=GS_cepco

CCMoe
 

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Oh yeah! :ditto: Certainly agree on that. Well worth the money when doing our two decks.:fing32:

Jere, thanks for the scare, our side deck is starting to show some wear on the stain (actually it started last year) so should be doing it. I generally put it off till Fall (lots cooler) but then I figure why do it just to have it covered with snow? "Guess I'll wait for spring." Last time I did that it went five years, not three like I use to. Well seeing that picture convinces me. This Fall is the time! :dunno: Hopefully.:hide:
MikeC
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #7
It is pretty stinking hot here in the mid-Atlantic, and it is a holiday, but, I hate projects that drag out. So, this morning, while temps were only in the 80's, I took some more of the old deck off:



At which point my dear wife, and supervisor of 40+ years observed that we should scrub the slider, siding, windows, and especially behind the balustrades while there is still an old deck to stand on:



Help is always appreciated, especially supervisory help!
 

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It is pretty stinking hot here in the mid-Atlantic, and it is a holiday, but, I hate projects that drag out. So, this morning, while temps were only in the 80's, I took some more of the old deck off:



At which point my dear wife, and supervisor of 40+ years observed that we should scrub the slider, siding, windows, and especially behind the balustrades while there is still an old deck to stand on:



Help is always appreciated, especially supervisory help!
//////////////////////////////////

Alas--good thinking--bad timing...STOP one project to do a side, but associated project--and hard to get back to original focus. My supervisor of 46 years is right there w/ me all the time--except she wants it 'right now''--even if 6 pm at night and I'm dog-tired.
Sorry--didn't mean to steal ur show..
Go--Jere--go!!

glenn
 

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I'll never get to 10,000
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Jere,
Know your pain! We redid our back deck 3 years ago. Same as you, it was done in the heat of July & August.
https://www.mytractorforum.com/88-my-place/1029274-new-floor-back-deck.html
As others have mentioned the composites get hot in the sun, no matter what color you have. Plus, ours on the northwest side of house gets a film of green on it from one year to next. Have to brush it good with simple green to keep it looking nice. Still a lot easier than using power washer with PT wood that was on there.
Good luck & keep us posted!
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys. On top of the heat and humidity, we have thunderstorms every 12 hours or so. And as a "retiree" I don't have to work in the rain, and can work at my own pace in the heat. So, as predicted, I am not making progress at the pace I would want if I were paying someone to get it done. Anyway, I pulled a section of the deck off today, and so far, the substructure looks pretty good:



And my supervisor found a picture of the house before this deck was built, back when there was a stack of RR ties leading to the sliders out from the dining room. The operator there on the excavator is the same young man who shows up in my motorcycle videos except now he is 6'3" and has a long ZZTop style beard.

 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #11
Jere,
Know your pain! We redid our back deck 3 years ago. Same as you, it was done in the heat of July & August.
https://www.mytractorforum.com/88-my-place/1029274-new-floor-back-deck.html
As others have mentioned the composites get hot in the sun, no matter what color you have. Plus, ours on the northwest side of house gets a film of green on it from one year to next. Have to brush it good with simple green to keep it looking nice. Still a lot easier than using power washer with PT wood that was on there.
Good luck & keep us posted!
I watched your progress in that thread and even optomistically contributed that I was only a couple weeks behind you on my own project. Well, that couple weeks turned into 3 years. You still happy with your deck surface? Still holding the color, staying clean, and not too hot to walk on?

Thanks for the reminder
 

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I'll never get to 10,000
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I watched your progress in that thread and even optomistically contributed that I was only a couple weeks behind you on my own project. Well, that couple weeks turned into 3 years. You still happy with your deck surface? Still holding the color, staying clean, and not too hot to walk on?

Thanks for the reminder
I am happy with it compared to the PT deck boards.
It does get hot, but I think that is the norm with all composites. Ours is brown, but have been on light gray decks and they get hot also. It's the nature of the beast.
Color has held up good. There has been some mold/green residue that has developed each year, but as I mentioned before, some Simple Green solution and stiff broom/brush and cleans up nice.
Also, have to use plastic snow shovel in winter time so the boards don't get scrapped up by a rough metal shovel when cleaning up by the back door.

The only other issue I have had with it and will not do again is hidden fasteners. The deck boards are vinyl wrapped to give varying wood grain texture & color. The dog somehow was able to pull part of the vinyl off. I would have had to pull half of deck off to replace it, but ended up cutting a patch from leftover piece & glueing down after trimming torn section clean. I will get some pictures to show. The front deck we just did I went with screw thru boards and am happy with the look.
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks. I've decided to strip my entire deck before starting to lay the new composite. I really want to be very confident of my decision to use the existing substructure. Everything looks good so far. And, in spite of this absolutely oppresive heat and humidity, I am still making progress. And, as luck would have it, I'll get a break this afternoon to mow the lawn.



And, the growing pile of decking that has been removed, and nails removed (as best I can, some were so rusted and deteriorated they broke off and with the nailer buried heads, I would have had to ruin more of the board to cat's paw it out, so I let them. Next use will need to be vigilent before sawing:

 

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I'll never get to 10,000
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Thanks. I've decided to strip my entire deck before starting to lay the new composite. I really want to be very confident of my decision to use the existing substructure. Everything looks good so far. And, in spite of this absolutely oppresive heat and humidity, I am still making progress. And, as luck would have it, I'll get a break this afternoon to mow the lawn.
And, the growing pile of decking that has been removed, and nails removed (as best I can, some were so rusted and deteriorated they broke off and with the nailer buried heads, I would have had to ruin more of the board to cat's paw it out, so I let them. Next use will need to be vigilent before sawing:
Structure looks good. Find any interesting stuff/animals/etc. underneath?
I still have a pile of about half of my old deck boards that need to be removed/recycled. I was thinking about making planter boxes or something else, but time is not my friend.
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #15
The near tropical weather has me hopping to keep up with the mowing, my Grand kids watching, and an unplanned visit from my sister and family. Today I had a quick repair to A/C at church, some furniture rearrangement for the mid-summer floor strip and wax. But, this afternoon, I got back to my deck and ripped off another 100 square feet.



It takes more time to pull the nails and sort my strippings for some as yet unassigned project:



Progress is not quite stalled, but neither is it flying by.
 

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Jere,

The underside of your deck boards looked better than I would have expected considering the top side. There's a chance you could have flipped them a few years ago, hit them with a belt sander while they were off and reset them. The drawback with that is you put the good side up when you installed it originally which would probably leave a rough deck top.

I recently built a wheelchair ramp, starting point was 50" off the ground. I got 40' of run due to area restrictions with a 6' X 6' landing on the top and a 5' X 6' 6" turn around landing half way down. Regulations call for 1" fall for 1' of run with a maximum fall just under 1.5" fall for a foot of run. I built this out of a donated ramp, new PT from Menards, Lowe's and the local Ace Hardware lumber yard. All were in different stages of drying out. It was a challenge getting the hand rail joinery to match up with varying thicknesses, widths. I broke out the belt sander and router to clean up the joints.

Looking forward to your refurbishment of your deck, I like the design.

I did notice the no post corners coming off the bench returning to the house, where did you come up with that design? I like it also.

CCMoe
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #17
Jere,

The underside of your deck boards looked better than I would have expected considering the top side. There's a chance you could have flipped them a few years ago, hit them with a belt sander while they were off and reset them. The drawback with that is you put the good side up when you installed it originally which would probably leave a rough deck top.

I recently built a wheelchair ramp, starting point was 50" off the ground. I got 40' of run due to area restrictions with a 6' X 6' landing on the top and a 5' X 6' 6" turn around landing half way down. Regulations call for 1" fall for 1' of run with a maximum fall just under 1.5" fall for a foot of run. I built this out of a donated ramp, new PT from Menards, Lowe's and the local Ace Hardware lumber yard. All were in different stages of drying out. It was a challenge getting the hand rail joinery to match up with varying thicknesses, widths. I broke out the belt sander and router to clean up the joints.

Looking forward to your refurbishment of your deck, I like the design.

I did notice the no post corners coming off the bench returning to the house, where did you come up with that design? I like it also.

CCMoe
Not exactly following your question there, but it was a long time ago. I'm not sure where the design to incorporate benches into the deck came. It turns out they were rarely used, and we will not be doing that again.

Finally got the demo portion very close to complete yesterday, with the small task of removing the railing posts and spindles that were nailed, screwed, and lagged to the deck frame and risers. Some 20 years after that happened we added the hardscaping, including a small wall that blocked access to the heads of said screws, lag bolts, even the nails.



But, is any demo job really finished before the Sawzall weighs in?

So, now the railings, benches, steps and deck surface are cleared and ready for the next step.



I think I'll pressure wash the foundation wall that has been hidden under the deck for the last couple decades. Probably wash the structure too. I've found a single joist that I am not comfortable with, so I'll probably just sister it and screw into the new joist.

I'm wondering if any of y ou ever put some kind of ground cover (black paper, mulch, wood chips, stones) under your deck? This would be the perfect time for me to do it.

Thanks folks for watching.
 

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Love these posts you make Jere!! Always fun to see everyone else's issues lol I am in need of ripping my deck of and re doing it. Its in a little worse shape than yours and never properly flashed so I plan on starting from scratch. Mine was built in '93 so its of the same era.

As far as the under deck goes I have used/seen crushed stone the most. I think it looks best and with no sunlight generally you get no weeds under there. If you can't see underneath there really is no need to add anything but its all personal preference. You can also add lattice around the deck to block the view as well. Thanks for posting all your hard work! I have enough stuff to do I wish I could retire now so I could stay busy with everything ha ha. But I still got about 30 years to go! :tango_face_surprise :tango_face_grin::tango_face_grin:
 

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Not exactly following your question there, but it was a long time ago. I'm not sure where the design to incorporate benches into the deck came. It turns out they were rarely used, and we will not be doing that again.

Finally got the demo portion very close to complete yesterday, with the small task of removing the railing posts and spindles that were nailed, screwed, and lagged to the deck frame and risers. Some 20 years after that happened we added the hardscaping, including a small wall that blocked access to the heads of said screws, lag bolts, even the nails.



But, is any demo job really finished before the Sawzall weighs in?

So, now the railings, benches, steps and deck surface are cleared and ready for the next step.



I think I'll pressure wash the foundation wall that has been hidden under the deck for the last couple decades. Probably wash the structure too. I've found a single joist that I am not comfortable with, so I'll probably just sister it and screw into the new joist.

I'm wondering if any of you ever put some kind of ground cover (black paper, mulch, wood chips, stones) under your deck? This would be the perfect time for me to do it.

Thanks folks for watching.
Black roofing rubber and mulch! Works every time! :tango_face_wink:
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Discussion Starter #20
Still plodding along on this project in between the other things I'm working on, and enjoying this summer. Instead of spending a couple hundred dollars on a dumpster, I spent a couple hours pulling the nails out of the deck, railing, and inbuilt benches before offering the well weathered lumber on a local community exchange site. I was shocked by the number of folks who replied they wanted it (if it's free, it's for me). But first guy who showed up prepared to take it got it:



Wife, Grandson, and I settled on final colors and railings at a local building supply:



This morning after a couple days without rain I treated the substructure with a mildew, mold, moss killer/preventative:



Just call me Joist Walker. You might notice I get my money's worth out of my jeans. Wear them out at the knees over the winter, cut them off, then wear them out in the thigh over the summer.
 
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