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I Love All Color Tractors
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What about using the two holes in the end of the deck for the deflector shield and the two in the other end to bolt the dolly wheels to one and and the handle in the other? The deck would stand up vertically against the wall. It would take up less space that way.

Anyone know what the two holes on the left end of the deck were for anyhow?
 

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Inveterate Putterer
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Discussion Starter #22
What about using the two holes in the end of the deck for the deflector shield and the two in the other end to bolt the dolly wheels to one and and the handle in the other? The deck would stand up vertically against the wall. It would take up less space that way.

Anyone know what the two holes on the left end of the deck were for anyhow?
When I designed mine, one of the criteria was to have everything accessible for cleaning and service. My design failed only in that the gauge wheel axle is not fully accessible and can't be removed while on the dolly. On the other hand, if one were to remove the gauge wheel axle before putting the deck on/into the dolly, the dolly would still work.

I'm trying to imagine how to get the bolts through the deck holes to bolt the deck to a dolly. It seems to me you would have to work the dolly from a jacked up position to get under the deck to hold the bolt heads.

No clue as to what those two holes might have ever been used for. I thought perhaps for the gizmo that puts a 40" or 50" 3 blade mower in front of a two wheeler, but nope. I just checked the IPL and they don't use them for that. In fact, the IPL does not show any use for them.
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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I'm actually thinking of mounting the dolly "ends" to the deck while it is still on the tractor. That way the lift will hold the deck up to reach up under it to put carriage bolts up through the holes. The dolly won't be in the way to remove the deck. I don't know that I could get it strong enough to be cut like that while just using cross bars and such for bracing.
 

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Inveterate Putterer
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Discussion Starter #24
I'm actually thinking of mounting the dolly "ends" to the deck while it is still on the tractor. That way the lift will hold the deck up to reach up under it to put carriage bolts up through the holes. The dolly won't be in the way to remove the deck. I don't know that I could get it strong enough to be cut like that while just using cross bars and such for bracing.
You know, if you did that there would be no need for the two long pieces that, on mine, mount the casters. I just made a really quick sketch. Not to any scale. The long part is the deck. Imagine the gear box, lift mechanism, belt guards, etc., on the top, located between the two uprights.

In this sort of thing, the deck shell becomes a part of the "dolly" resulting in a carrier that is far easier/smaller to store.

 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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That's really slick thinking Mikey. I like it a lot.

My idea is to stand the deck up on it's end to take up a lot less space horizontally and strap it to the wall. Of course, your way lets the deck stay mobile to be moved out of the way of something or other. I think I like your way better.
 

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The sticky thing was a very nice surprise!

If you build a lean-to, just mind the direction of the prevailing winds. Around here you probably want to have the open side facing southeast (or east) if possible.
I may even add doors to it just to make it weather resistant. Either way, a great idea! Thanks.


Sent from the MTF Free App
 

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You know, if you did that there would be no need for the two long pieces that, on mine, mount the casters. I just made a really quick sketch. Not to any scale. The long part is the deck. Imagine the gear box, lift mechanism, belt guards, etc., on the top, located between the two uprights.

In this sort of thing, the deck shell becomes a part of the "dolly" resulting in a carrier that is far easier/smaller to store.

And those same uprights could be used for a 40" or a 50". Perhaps add a 4x4" block or something similar to raise the height for the longer rear wheels of the 60" and 72" decks.

Alex
 

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Mikey4,

Thanks for the drawing, I like it just way you have it, hope to build one real soon for my 50" deck.

Which will also get it's double blade conversion completed in a week or so.

More on that later in my improvement thread.

Sheldon
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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I have a fabricator friend that works in aluminum a lot. I'm going to ask him what a pair of stands done in aluminum would run. Probably way too high. I'm now wondering too if there would be enough weight.
 

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I have a fabricator friend that works in aluminum a lot. I'm going to ask him what a pair of stands done in aluminum would run. Probably way too high. I'm now wondering too if there would be enough weight.
My thinking is wood is the perfect material for this - strong enough, heavy enough but still light enough, and more friendly to the edges and surfaces of the deck.

Wood is not likely to scratch or scuff the paint on the deck.

Sheldon
 

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Perfectly valid points Sheldon. I'm leaning back to wood because of the weight. While the deck is standing straight up, or nearly so, it still needs some weight to the brackets to keep it from flopping back down into position. A little angle to the brackets to put the deck into a ten or 15° bottom up angle would be pretty good for service as well as give it a some more stability.
 

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Inveterate Putterer
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Discussion Starter #32
Mikey4,

Thanks for the drawing, I like it just way you have it, hope to build one real soon for my 50" deck.

Which will also get it's double blade conversion completed in a week or so.

More on that later in my improvement thread.

Sheldon
Wood has the added advantage of being cheap. It is also quite likely within the skill set of most anyone who follows this forum.

Sheldon, if you are going to follow my original design, instead of the aluminum angle brace I added after the fact, use a plywood gusset as is shown on the quick sketch of the version that attaches to the deck.

Thinking about the version that attaches to the deck, it seems to me a good idea to lay out and drill the two holes in each carrier and insert T-nuts instead of using loose nuts. Then just insert a bolt into the hole that will be at the top and hand tighten it into the T-nut. Then insert the lower one, also hand tight. This saves needing two hands (one for the bolt and one for the nut) while reaching under and above the deck simultaneously.

That should be more than enough to hold the deck and easy to remove when the time comes.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Perfectly valid points Sheldon. I'm leaning back to wood because of the weight. While the deck is standing straight up, or nearly so, it still needs some weight to the brackets to keep it from flopping back down into position. A little angle to the brackets to put the deck into a ten or 15° bottom up angle would be pretty good for service as well as give it a some more stability.
DJ, more like 2º or 3º is plenty. Don't forget you have the gear box and lift hardware hanging off that face of the deck, countering the weight of the deck itself. Look closely at the pictures and video of the prototype and you'll see the wood upright is perfectly perpendicular, no angle at all. The angle comes in by making the bottom a little wider than need be and allowing the deck to lean back naturally. Even with less than 5º the deck feels well balanced and very solid.
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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I like the idea of the bolts and Tee nuts. It makes good sense.
 

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The separate pieces bolted to the deck does not work for me. I have the bagger vacuum, and never remove the attachment bars/nuts/bolts that hold the boot on.

Rather than plywood, I am thinking sightly more expensive lumber for those pieces, like 5/4 x 8. It would be more rigid than plywood and provide the same bracing.

But I will go for premium lumber in any case - being a carpenter/wood worker as part of my trade, I know the value of a good piece of wood.

Sheldon
 
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