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Discussion Starter #1
We were working on a ballfield yesterday with the 1070 when one of the front tires went flat. One of the guys noticed that the front tires had tubes in them. We had the dealer replace the front tires last fall because they were getting worn and had many plugs in them and we needed other work done on the tractor at the time so I didn't think it was a big deal. I called the dealer service dept and asked why they put tubes in tubeless tires. They told me that once you break the factory bead then the new tires will always leak. What a bunch of bull!!! We have NEVER, EVER put tubes in our tires on any of our machines. The worse case was with a Kubota F3060 mower when the calcium filled rims rotted out from the inside so we had to replace the rims and the tires. So yesterday, we used a portable air tank to get the tractor back up on the trailer, I brought the tractor back to the shop and put the rim on the tire machine, pulled out the tube, the rim was in great shape, applied some bead sealer and a metal screw on valve stem and viola, NO LEAKS!!! Once, if ever , I get caught up, I'm going to pull apart the other front tire. Turns out some gunk managed to get in the valve stem hole in the rim where the tube stem was sticking out. Tubes are bad, bad, bad!!!!! Dealer is starting to make me think that along with some other questionable jobs they have done, that maybe I should look elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Why put tubes in tubeless tires? Do you ever get a puncture? You cant plug it you have to break down the tire. Ever get water in through the opening in the rim where the valve stem comes out? You'll get rot inside the rim. Plus crap can get in there and wear away and abrade the tube.
 

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The Magnificent
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There is little chance any junk gets past the stem of a properly inflated tube. Also the tube will receive and contain the water from the air used to fill the tube, rather than having it rust the rim.

Tubes prevent the bead from accidentally unseating on a low pressure tire, and prevent blowouts that can occur during a loaded turn.

I would not use my FEL with tubeless tires. Of course, I am a safety Nazi.

You are honestly the first person I've met to decry tube use. Interesting point of view, but I think you are going to hear much strong disagreement with your position.
 

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Retired Aug.31 2007
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When I get a flat it gets a tube and slime in the tube. Once a tire is done that way I seldom ever have to bother with a flat untill the tire is wore out.
 

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JD RULES
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Hi all ,

I don't use tubes , just never needed them and SLIME only guarantee's it's
performance for 2 years , then they recommend removing the product and
replace with new , (not happening) ... What I use is a product from
www.gemplers.com called ULTRASEAL , very good product , our Military
uses it and no expiration date !!!

Later,x595
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would either plug or patch the tire. None of our loaders have tubes. Non of our back-hoes have tubes. If a low pressure tire blows out then it was overloaded. Keep the tubes for fun on the lake.
 

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USMC
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I would either plug or patch the tire. None of our loaders have tubes. Non of our back-hoes have tubes. If a low pressure tire blows out then it was overloaded. Keep the tubes for fun on the lake.
:ditto: :ditto: :ditto: slkpk
 

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If you live on a farm long enough you're going use a tube eventually. Just put a new tire on the IH 82 pull-type Combine she gotta tube to boot. Slow
leaks is what gets most of ours, not punctures or cuts. A slow leak will nag
you to death.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Won't just about any tire slowly leak all of it's air over time? I think if you have a nagging leak, then you find the leak and you fix it. If your valve stem leaks you're going to break down the tire and put a tube in it? If you're leaking air through the bead you're gonna break down the tire and put a tube in it, instead of replacing the valve stem or cleaning and sealing the bead? If putting a tube in you're tire is the way you want to fix a problem, OK with you. But a professional Deere service department should know how to properly install a tractor tire on a tractor rim the way it is supposed to be installed and I don't see any tube in a parts breakdown for any Deere tractors, do you? My 2 cts.
 

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But a professional Deere service department should know how to properly install a tractor tire on a tractor rim the way it is supposed to be installed and I don't see any tube in a parts breakdown for any Deere tractors, do you? My 2 cts.
That would be why you got a tube.

Also, why would you put calcium in to a tubeless tire?
 

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Just passing through
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Tubes vs Tubeless

Hokey Smoke...we've discovered another issue rivaling politics and religion...:D

When it comes to loading tires...Rim Guard is the way to go...non-polluting/ non-rim-rotting beet mixture...;)

http://www.rimguard.biz/

Rim Guard™ was developed and patented in 1998 as a liquid tire ballast that overcame all of the shortcomings of other liquid tire ballasts.
• Rim Guard™ is nearly 30% heavier than water.
• Rim Guard™ is non-corrosive.
• Rim Guard™ is non-toxic and biodegradable.
• Rim Guard™ is freeze-resistant down to -35°F.
• Rim Guard™ is cost effective because inner tubes are not needed and tires are easier to repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
We didn't put the calcium in the F3060's tires, the Kubota dealer did when they sold us the mower. The machine had filled tires and wheel weights to provide added traction to the drive tires and provide added stability for the machine because of the hopper that rests on a frame over the rear hood raised the center of gravity. Rim Guard, beet-juice, whatever works for you. I think the standard procedure when loading a tire with CaCl is to fill it so much that none of the inside rim is exposed to air. Try checking tire pressure with a calcium filled tire...it will destroy the gauge.
 

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The reason we put tubes in whenever we take a tyre off is because almost every LT or GT and a lot of compacts actually need them.

Most manufacturers use tubeless tyres, but they are not tubeless rims. New machines generally arrive with almost flat tyres so we just inflate them to the correct pressure, but if the bead has broken we fit tubes. I always have tubes in my machines and have had no problems with punctures, but have the satisfaction that a puncture in a tube can be repaired in the field with basic tools.

If someone has a lot of thorns we fit tubes and thornguards. Or for a larger tractor doing hedgecutting work etc we would recommend nailguards.

Calcium will always rot the rims if used without tubes, it is not only impossible to fill the tyre completely so there is no air gap but it is also against all the recommendations I have seen. A tractor needs something compressible in the tyres (air) as that is its suspension.
 

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I think you are missing the point to the installation of the tube. They actually fixed it correctly for themselves. They could sit there and dick around with sealing beads and replacing valve stems but in the end its messy, it could still leak or worse you could get out in the field and have a slow leak failure..... thus causing you aggravation and JD free shop time to rectify the problem. So instead they remove the tire, pull the stem and remount with a tube (in about the same amount of time it will take you to read this response). With a tube installation they are 99% sure you will not call bitching it still leaks.
 

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Tubes are the only way to squeeze a few more miles and years out of garden tractor tires that have weather cracks that let air seep out too--slime wont help there,nor will it seal bead leaks..and I have only "plugged" one or two lawn tractor turf tires sucessfully with auto style plugs or rope,they RIP too easily ,and often the plugs fail to bond with the vinyl like "rubber" they are made from..so you end up taking them off anyway to install a patch on the inside,so you might as well have had a tube anyway!..

I'd take a tube anyday ,when it comes to lawn tractor tires myself..and I'd never use calcium without a tube either--or EVER again period,after having to shell out nearly 300 bucks for new rear rims on my 641 Ford I had..
 

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If you live on a farm long enough you're going use a tube eventually. Slow
leaks is what gets most of ours, not punctures or cuts. A slow leak will nag
you to death.
:ditto: :ditto: :ditto: A person can't always afford new rims and our older farm equipment end up with rims that simply won't support tubeless use. Plus on my garden tractors, the tires may have years of use left, but dry-crack causes slow leaks. Tubes end the aggravation. I've never had a garden tractor with tubes ever go down or get punctured.
 

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I called the dealer service dept and asked why they put tubes in tubeless tires. They told me that once you break the factory bead then the new tires will always leak. What a bunch of bull!!! We have NEVER, EVER put tubes in our tires on any of our machines. The worse case was with a Kubota F3060 mower when the calcium filled rims rotted out from the inside so we had to replace the rims and the tires.
Yes, the dealer is full of crap. If that was the case, then on our cars & trucks, we'd have to buy new wheels every tire replacement.
What I want to know is why the Kubota dealer put calcium in tubeless tires??????? I'd not let that dealer service my stuff, but then I do all my own service & rebuilding anyway.
 

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Re: Tubes vs Tubeless

Hokey Smoke...we've discovered another issue rivaling politics and religion...:D
Ain't the the truth! I didn't realize people were so passionate about air in their
tires. IE: "If putting a tube in you're tire is the way you want to fix a
problem, OK with you."
I think I know how to check if a valve stem is
leaking, so no I'm not going to put dang tube in for a leaking valve stem.
We just put a new tire on a nearly 40 year old pull type Combine and if one
does that and doesn't put a tube in it while going through the same process
then, well I can't say what I want to say. I spent $83 on a new tire and $15 on
a tube, that's $15 for one less possible future headache while we're trying to
get something done that's more important than driving around on a well
manicured lawn. :thSick:
 
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