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My daughter took first place in the county for her 4H welding project. Next week she goes to the state fair to compete agianst all the other winners in the state. We're very proud of her, she's had a big year.
Pete
 

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Congratulations to your daughter.
 

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Congratulations to your daughter. Any chance of a couple of pictures of her project? Show off her work.

Paul
:wwp: :wwp: :wwp:
 

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I agree :wwp: My daughter came home from jr high once and I asked if she could use my welder and weld up a DNA model. Now she is in her 2nd year of Michigan Tech for Mechanical Engineering...God I miss my little girl
 

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My 1st thought was, pictures, my second thought was, what kind of welder she uses? I'm impressed, both my boys have their own helmets and do weld on little things, mom keeps 'em out of the garage on the larger projects.
How old is she? Thats awsome, wish her all the luck!!
 

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how old is she?
 

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Wheres the pictures? We wanna see, congrats and good luck at the fair!
 

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I'll trade you a wife that can sew . . .:sidelaugh :sidelaugh
 

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My daughter took first place in the county for her 4H welding project. Next week she goes to the state fair to compete agianst all the other winners in the state. We're very proud of her, she's had a big year.
Pete
:thThumbsU

OKAY...so how did she do?
 

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I did not hear about that. Details?
http://www.welding-rod-dangers.com/illness/illness_welders.htm

Parkinson’s Disease, Manganism, and Cancer in Welders

Welding can be a dangerous job, leading to breathing difficulties, an illness called manganism that is similar to Parkinson’s disease, or even Parkinson’s disease itself. Welders may also be more prone to lung cancer than the rest of the population, according to some reports (Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Apr; 15(3): 285–94; Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Jun; 28(3): 163–7; Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct; 30(4): 373–82). Welding fumes may cause many of these health problems, since they contain harmful substances such as iron, manganese, chromium, cadmium, and nickel.
Breathing In Welding Fumes Can Damage Your Nervous System

Welding rods can give off manganese–containing fumes during the welding process. Although small amounts of manganese are contained in your food, breathing in excess manganese damages your nervous system. As a result, many welders develop a condition called manganese poisoning or “manganism.” Patients with manganism exhibit a fixed gaze, tremors, a rigid body, and slowed movement. The signs of manganism are similar to those of Parkinson’s disease.

Exposure to welding fumes increases your risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, especially at an earlier age than expected (see Welders Have a High Rate of Parkinson’s Disease). If you have worked around welding fumes, we urge you to get regular medical checkups. Also, be on the look–out for any Parkinson–like signs such as tremors, shaking, difficulty in walking, and balance problems. Describe these conditions to your doctor. See Diagnosing Parkinson’s Disease and Manganism Diagnosis for more details.
Other Health Issues Related to Welding Fumes

As a welder, manganism and Parkinson’s disease might not be your only health concerns. Welders are also more likely to suffer from severe, long–lasting lung infections, bronchitis, and asthma (J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Feb 13; 67(3): 233–49). One New Zealand study showed an increased rate of bronchitis and reduced lung capacity in 62 career welders, as opposed to a group of 75 non–welders (Occup Environ Med. 1998 Mar; 55(3): 150–4). Welders may also contract siderosis, a temporary reduced lung capacity due to iron oxide exposure (Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1993 Aug;48(4): 304–14).

Some researchers have linked excess manganese exposure to impotence and infertility in men (Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Jul; 101 Suppl 2: 81–90; ATSDR, Public Health Statement for Manganese). Others have suggested that welders exposed to manganese in welding fumes develop anxiety, nervousness, memory loss, learning problems, and aggressive behavior (Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct; 206(6): 517–29; Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr–Jun;20 (2–3): 367–78).The effect of manganese on a woman’s reproductive system is not clear, and more studies need to be done on manganese and fertility in both men and women.
Welding and Asbestos–Related Diseases

Some welding rods are coated with asbestos. Asbestos fibers may be released during welding, increasing a welder’s chances of contracting asbestos–related diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer, and a severe cancer called mesothelioma. It can take decades to develop an asbestos–related disease—at least 15 years for asbestosis and 40 years or more for mesothelioma. Symptoms of these diseases, including cough, shortness of breath, and fatigue, are similar to symptoms of many other diseases. Therefore, if you have been exposed to welding fumes and are experiencing respiratory problems, we again urge you to visit your doctor and provide details about your exposure.
 

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I had heard about those Paul, but I could not find anything refering to Women, and reproductive harm.

This is all I saw.. "The effect of manganese on a woman’s reproductive system is not clear, and more studies need to be done on manganese and fertility in both men and women. "
 

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I had heard about those Paul, but I could not find anything refering to Women, and reproductive harm.

This is all I saw.. "The effect of manganese on a woman’s reproductive system is not clear, and more studies need to be done on manganese and fertility in both men and women. "
Well another group that deals with Manganese Fumes seems to have updated data...

http://www.claytimes.com/reference-guide/health-safety.html

Anyone who works with clay should be aware of the potential hazards associated with ingredients of not only clay in general, but also the individual components of each specific clay or glaze used.

For example, harmless as clay ingredients may seem, some clays contain manganese to achieve a speckled, reduction look in an oxidation firing. But chronic inhalation of manganese has been linked with a degenerative nervous system disease and adverse reproductive effects.

In addition to clay ingredients, one should be aware of the potential side effects of using individual glaze chemicals and various other ingredients and compounds present in the potter's studio. By law, all suppliers of the raw materials used in the clay artist's studio are required to make available Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to anyone who requests them. Each MSDS for a clay or glaze lists all ingredients used, along with potential side effects associated with these materials.

It's especially important for pregnant women to research the materials they use in their studios. Lead, which is extremely toxic, should not be used by a pregnant woman for any reason, as even minute amounts can cause serious birth defects in the developing fetus.
 

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Basically welding is toxic. The impacts are variable dependent on rod/flux, base metal etc etc. EM radiation is also a concern. MSDS sheets do not tell you anything about "propritory" components of a product nor do they explore synergistic/antogonistic effects.

Find a female boiler maker/pipefitter who has 20 years in the trade and talk to her. She'll know more then you 'll need.

If you must train her in the trade at the very least provide the kid with a fitted respirator, shop clothes and a shower soon after being in the shop.Limit her exposure to as close to zero as possible. My experience with children however is that most would benefit more from time with Dad in the fresh air, doing some form of exercise.
That being said time with Dad doing anything is very important. Keep up the good work, your daughter is lucky to have you.
 
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