My Tractor Forum banner

D-160 rear axle load?

3785 Views 11 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  TUDOR
Over the Christmas break I repaired the rear axle casing on my D-160 and now start on other tasks to get it back running again.

Once I have it running I would like to fit a fork lift mast on the back. The mast I have weights about 150-200kg. Most of the time I expect to lift about 250kg and infrequently up to 1000kg. I am thinking about building a frame the full length of the tractor to spread the weight and to allow for weights to be added to the front. I am concerned about how much weight the rear axle will take. The stub axle is about 7 1/2 inches from the axle which will not help. I have also fitted refitted the wheels to give greater offset to increase stability.

I could reduce the load by turning the wheels around (ie. the inset position), or add an I beam with pillar bearings under the axle which would reduce the unsupported axle by about 3 inches but this will be a lot of work. The axle is 1 1/8inch diameter. I could also add helper wheels to the forklift mast but this would not always help on uneven ground.

Am I trying to do too much with this tractor, do I modify it as suggested above or will it be ok? What is the maximum weight the axle will take without damage? All views very welcome.

The tractor current has the original tyres which have rotted. They are 27x9.50x15, what is the best size tyre for a D-series?

Some pictures attached of the axle and wheels in the inset and offset position.

Many thanks
Iain
See less See more
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Second attempt at loading the pictures

Attachments

See less See more
3
Easy fix...
Mount piller-block bearing on your axle and hang your weight from the bearings.
This way none of the weight will be on the tranny.
Easy fix...
Mount piller-block bearing on your axle and hang your weight from the bearings.
This way none of the weight will be on the tranny.
I like the idea of an easy fix. I should have mentioned that I am new to this sort of thing and the your easy fix idea is making my brain hurt.

I have sketched what I think you mean. Does this look about right?

I think I understand how this will reduce the loading on the tranny but don't I still have a high loading on the axle shafts?

Sorry if I am being thick
Iain

Attachments

See less See more
Doesn't matter what arrangents you make for carrying the load, it will all end up exceeding the load carrying rating of the axle. Weight of the tractor on the rear end + reinforcement and lifting device + 1000 kg behind the axle + sufficient counter weight to balance the payload in front of the axle = over 2400 kg (5290 lb) on the axle. We're talking 3/4 ton truck axle capacity here for your extreme case.

Even a 250 kg payload translates into a 900+ kg (1984+ lb) load on the axle. I don't know of any GT axle rated that high.

I don't hesitate to load my front axle to near that higher level, it's a cheap and easy repair compared to the rear end. No way would I load a GT differential to that level!

I'm not saying that it will fail, only that you should not be surprised if (or when) it does.
See less See more
I'd have to agree with Bob, I think you need a bigger tractor. The "D" series are big but not made to handle that amount of weight. I have the 50" tiller for mine, I would say it weighs maybe 200-250 lbs. The front end still jumps when lowering and stopping short of the ground. I can't imagian what would happen trying to move around with 3000lbs on the back of my tractor.
See less See more
I disagree... The axle load on that tractor has everything to do with the overhang.
That axle is just as large as some small trucks. But the trucks have no overhang.
If the bearing is placed close to the wheel I dont think you could find something heavy enough to brake your axle.

Attachments

See less See more
This loader is rated at 2250 pounds (about 1000 kg)

Scale model Vehicle Measuring instrument


Look at the axle International used.
See less See more
My Christmas tree hand truck has 3/4" axles.
I've moved 3000 lbs with it a few times.
The Powerking tractor in the picture moves machines over 2000 lbs all the time. Im not saying you cant break an axle, but if your carefull it's doable.

Attachments

See less See more
Thanks for the comments.

To explore this a little further, I turned one of the wheels around which appears to give a more even loading on the axle. In the attached picture the right hand wheel has been turned around. It will be difficult to support the axle at the end due to the length of the hub. The support will be about 4 inches in from the end of the axle.

Kbeitz, do you think this will still work with support this far in?

Most of the time I will only be moving a few pallets. If I continue with this I was thinking of fitting two lengths of 4x2 inch channel the length of the tractor which would be fixed to the attachment points on the tractor frame. I would them add an I beam across the axle for the bearings. This would be fitted to the channel. The fork lift mast would hang from the channel and counter balance weights fitted to the channel on the front of the tractor.

I do not want to break this tractor as they are very rare in the UK, however a bigger tractor is not an option. i have thought about making a mast however this would would probabily end up weighing move than the one I have. The mast I have is designed to hang from the three point linkage of a full size tractor. I believe it was used on a MF135.

Iain

Attachments

See less See more
2
With the weight your wanting to move I see no problem.
Look at it this way. With a garden plow sunk deep in the dirt and the front wheels in the sky what kind of torque do you think is on the back axles.
Or snow blading snow up a snowbank till the wheels are spinning with chains and weights. Then to top it off the people that use the tractors for tractor pulls with hundreds of lbs of weights hanging all over the tractor.
If it was me I would do it...
I also would like other people to give there $0.02 worth good or bad...
My bet would be if one was to keep putting weights on your forklift pound for pound I bet you would get over 10,000 lbs on it before the axle would snap.
Thats my $0.02 worth...
See less See more
Torque loading for the axles is a whole other proposition from the load carrying aspects. If the tires spin, generally speaking, you haven't got enough weight on them to exceed the axle torque rating. I've had my 2400 lb MF1655 digging holes with the chained rear wheels at 2/3 throttle with the front wheels in the air while digging into a pile of gravel. No big torque load there. Spinning tires on snow takes even less. Now pushing a 7000 lb trailer up hill, with 800 lb of buddies sitting on the back of the tractor, at full throttle, and not spinning results in serious torque loading. Something like when you moved that house. Somehow, I don't think the GT pulling tractors could do that job. Not enough weight to generate the required torque.

I don't know about 10000 lb, but they will certainly carry more than the manufacturer recommends as a maximum. A bigger concern than snapping the axle is bending the axle. When new, the manufacturer had to pay for warranty work if the axle failed, therefore the recommended max load rating is partially set by his willingness to make good on the warranty as well as the actual strength designed in.


However, that tractor hasn't been new for quite some time and wear and tear will have taken at least some toll on the drive train and no one knows how it was treated along the way.

I have no problem overloading components which are inexpensive to purchase, readily available, or easily repaired in-house. Since the OP lives in the UK, parts are not inexpensive, definitely not readily available, and, unless he has access to a well equipped machine shop, not always easily repaired. Not everyone has Kevin Beitz's talents and skills to create working masterpieces out of scrap, which is why I tend to give conservative advise.

Would I put a fork lift on the rear? Absolutely! Carry a 250 kilo payload? Of course! Carry a 500 kilo lb payload? Hmm, maaybeee. Carry a 1000 kilo payload? That would require at least 450 kilos of counter weight on the front end in order to maintain steering. Does the OP really want to drive around with a constant 450 kilo load of weights (24 42 lb suitcase weights) on the front axle while doing other chores, or alternatively, put them on and take them off as the need arises. Power steering becomes kind of necessary at that level of payload and counterweighting.

The stability of a fork lift on the rear is undeniable. The repair cost should something fail in the rear end will be high. This is not a utility tractor that has the capability and mass to deal with 1 tonne loads. It is a garden tractor, or, more precisely, an estate tractor (Wheelhorse's designation, not mine), and has neither the capability nor the mass to play at that level without incurring damage at some point.

If the OP is set on using this attachment, mount it on the front where reinforcement and modification is easier and cheaper and any failures can be dealt with easily and in a timely manner with less stress on the pocketbook. Power steering is a must for working at these weights, no matter which end is used. Some of the necessary counter weight can be left in place without interfering with other tasks and additional counter weight can be easily hooked up to, or dropped off from, the 3PH as needed.

My MF1655 with a FEL will pick up and transport over 700 kilos (over 1500 lb) on a hard surface using only the counterweighting that it is normally equipped with and which did not include wheel weights. The FEL is a bit further out front than a dedicated fork lift is normally so that a 1000 kilo lift is possible with appropriate reinforcement and larger tires than what it has. That was a one time only lift that was actually beyond the limits of the tractor as it was equipped. It couldn't climb the 40 mm (1.6") lip at the garage entrance.

Bottom line, a 1000 kilo lift is a high risk endeavour. I'm not saying that it can't be done, only that you should expect to break it at some point if you plan on making a habit of lifting in that domain. Forewarned, and all that rubbish.

p.s. Fabricating a truss for additional support may help the axles. What effect will the maximum forces have on the differential carrier and gear meshing either with or without the truss? Something else to think about.
See less See more
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top