My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,976 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever cut through a cab roof? My white 94 F250 is a regular cab but I carry tools and want more space in the cab. I have a white 93 F150 regular cab parts truck. I have been thinking of cutting the off the roof and back wall of the cab on the 93 F150 in one "L" shaped piece. Then my plan was to cut the bottom of its back wall so I can place it at the front of my F250s bed so the top of each cab is the same height. From there I was going to add plexiglass to the sides so its not open. Since the front of the cab roof is curved I would have to either make some kind of pie sections out of something to fill in the gaps on each side.
Or I could cut the front of the donor cab roof matching the pattern of the back of the F250s cab. I'm sure there are 2 layers of metal in the cab roof so I would have to have someone else do some metal fab to seal it up unless the layers are close together. After cab piece installation I was planning to use some kind of caulking to seal the roof to roof and then remove the back window on my F250s cab and use that as my access to the new section. I also have a 92 F150 extended cab parts truck but its dark dark blue so I would have to paint it if I wanted it to match. I have a Super Sawzall but no welder. My body work experience is limited to swapping front fenders on a few vehicles. Any thoughts or ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
i'm really having a hard time understanding what you want to do. splicing cabs is gravy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
i'm really having a hard time understanding what you want to do. splicing cabs is gravy.
If I understand the proposition, he is wanting to rig up a "suicide sleeper" style tool box.

Can it be done? Well the qualified answer is, yes. Given the amount of fab work involved though it is hardly the kind of project I would recommend for a first time project.

When you cut the cab roof behind the windshield you will loose all structural integrity of the roof and some sort of support will be needed, as will the cab back when you cut the door pillars out to narrow it to fit inside the bed cavity.

I would suggest finding an old fiberglass camper shell and cutting that down to size. As the OP says he does not weld at least he could bond a topper back together with resin and cloth.

And for the idea of somehow bonding the cab to the bed? Bad Idea! The cab and the bed are designed to move independently of each other and the seam will flex too much to keep it sealed.

Roger
Old, Tired, and Grumpy
Bending and hammering sheet metal for 40+ years
 

·
Red Tractor Fan
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
So... you want to hack up your cab, attach another cab to the back of your cab.... and load it with tools? All at the back of your head, right?

This is kinda why they came out with tools boxes that fit between bed rails. "IF" you wanted more room in this manner, I would shorten the bed, and splice the back of an extended cab truck fully. But the tool box is the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,976 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So... you want to hack up your cab, attach another cab to the back of your cab.... and load it with tools? All at the back of your head, right?

This is kinda why they came out with tools boxes that fit between bed rails. "IF" you wanted more room in this manner, I would shorten the bed, and splice the back of an extended cab truck fully. But the tool box is the way to go.
I would have basic tools back there on the floor, not 250 pounds worth. Its main use would be for when I deliver pizza. A single cab doesn't have a lot of room for multiple deliveries.
 

·
Red Tractor Fan
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
If you check around, they do make things just like that that attach to the cab. They use an inflatable doughnut thing to seal the windows. Something like that would work better. Better still, a work truck cap with side access panels and inside shelving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,976 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you check around, they do make things just like that that attach to the cab. They use an inflatable doughnut thing to seal the windows. Something like that would work better. Better still, a work truck cap with side access panels and inside shelving.
You mean the donuts they make to go between a cab and the front of a topper?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,203 Posts
I can't imagine delivering Pizza in an F250 is very profitable. Buy a little hatch back, the fuel savings would pay for it in no time. Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,976 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Its my backup vehicle. I have a 4 cylinder Ranger that is my main vehicle.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top