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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi I am fairly new to the forum and have a 7 acre spread. 2 acres have a slope to them that I will be cutting into 3-4 terraces. I am currently using the FEL but it is a chore, because the soil is compact clay. Should I be using a box blade/scraper to get a smooth finish for the side walls of the terraces (I will be using RR ties for the 3 ft retaining walls and need a smooth edge to butt up against) or should I call in the pros with a bulldozer and let them have it...

I have a 3320 CC tractor, and enjoy seat time, but this is getting old and I feel that I am straining my rig...

Any thoughts ideas would be appreciated.

:thanku:






 

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Mark out where you want your terraces and rent a 50d track hoe and go after it for two days. You will be impressed how much work a 50d can do in two days.
 

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Stop! I would never load my tractor backwards on a trailer! You are going to loose control of your SVU because your weight is not correct on the trailer. Turn that tractor around and load it front first.
 

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From the pics it's hard to get a handle on the running feet of terraces you intend -- though it sounds like it may be a lot. If it is, then a dozer really is more efficient. It does look like you have some beautiful real estate! :)
 

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I Love All Color Tractors
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I guess it might be the perspective of the photos, but I just can't see where the area that you are working in is steep enough to justify the amount of work and expensive of putting in a retaining wall and bench system. Don't get me wrong, its your property and you do as you choose, but I mow regularly slopes that are steeper than that with no problems.

If you are going to do the excavation though, I have to agree with Team Green. Go rent yourself an excavator. Con a buddy into helping you run either the excavator or your tractor so that you can get as most of your rental time and not have to switch between machines all the time.

Are you sure you want to use railroad ties for your walls? You will only get about 15 years of life out of used ties before the rot enough to start failing. Regardless of what material you build the walls out of, be sure to put some drainage behind each wall. That clay will not allow water to percolate through and it will be forced out to the walls. It might be enough to cause them to fail over time.

I am not trying to find fault in everything you are doing. It may sound like that I am, but I am just bringing up points from my own been there, done that, I should have done this differently file.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input..

It is the perspective as from the right tree line to the left area of grass there is at least a 9 foot elevation over time (grant it it is spread over two acres) I have a formal plan laid out and need perfectly level quadrants, for the ideas I have).

I guess a 50 d it is then...

Is it hard to use? Also is it cheaper to have someone do it for me, or just knock it out myself? Time is important to me at this stage in my life, but if it is horrendously expensive I will make time...

The JD dealer told me to load it backwards... That Range Rover is a 3 ton full size vehicle, If you still think it is a problem please explain why :fing20:

:thanku:
 

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The photos do NOT look like much of a grade...have you done the numbers?
Seems like quite an expense over a 9 ft drop over 2 acres...
If you are set on doing this...just be careful you don't step off one terrace in the dark or in the winter when the snow hides the drops...fractured ankles and/or wrists can be painful and expensive...:(
 

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You really have a beautiful place and Im sure everything is going to work
out the way you want it. I look forward in seeing how your interesting project
turns out.:trink39:
 

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I have also read (in my manual) to always load a tractor front-facing.

I thought it was so that the driven-wind won't push open the doors and hood.

Just my $.02 :thThumbsU
 

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The JD dealer told me to load it backwards... That Range Rover is a 3 ton full size vehicle, If you still think it is a problem please explain why
The size of the tow vehicle really has very little to do with it. The problem is with the weight distribution on the trailer which may cause the tow vehicle to loose control and flip over at highway speeds. With the tractor loaded backwards, the weight is forward of the trailer axles and you actually have too much weight on the tongue, where as the weight should be balanced over the trailer axles, with very little weight on the tongue. Just want you to be safe, that’s all!
 

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Looking at the rear of the Range Rover, it certainly doesn't have too much tongue weight by the way the rear tires of the RR are centered in the fender well. If anything, it is probably too little tongue weight if the tractor is sitting where it will be towed. The box blade weighs maybe 350-375 lbs, which won't completely offset the weight of the FEL which is forward of the tractor's front wheels. Looks like the tractor should be backed until the box blade is about even with the front edge of the trailer, and the tractors rear tires should be just forward of the trailer's front axle. The Rover should have about a hundred pounds tongue weight and be squatting a little.

The Jd dealer might have recommended loading backwards because of the FEL. If he had the tractor far enough forward to balance the load, the bucket would be too close to the tow vehicle.

I'd still not go over 40 mph while towing that tractor, it and the trailer outweighs the Rover by a good 1000 pounds, and the Rover has a fairly short wheelbase.
 

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Hello, I have the same scenario in my property. I didn't want to spend the big bucks for a scarrifer implement or a box blade, I know there is a time where the box is better but since I also have a FEL my claw does alright. You can see it at the homemade tractor & implement section. I have added another section to it making the ripping area wider with more claws so I can cut faster with less passes.
Hope it helps.

JCR
 
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