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Discussion Starter #1
We built a stove out of a 120 gallon. Horizontal Air compressor Tank. We put a glav. Well casi g pipe down 8 inches Into The burn box. The top of the galv well casing pipe goes into the barrel heat exchanger . Then another piece of galv. Pipe Comes out the top of the barrel that connects to the flue. We have 14 feet of black stove pipe that goes up and out the roof of garage. Burns hot. We have two forced air fans pumpingair into burn box. It acts like it is starving for oxygen without the fans on. And it smokes out the fans and door until it gets really hot. I need good advice.
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OK, first off it was an extremely poor idea to use ANY galvanized metal in the construction. Galvanized metal uses zinc which when heated gives off fumes that will make you sick. Second, it appears that you don't have adequate draw out whatever chimney you have.

Another question is what did you use to clean the tank and other materials. Compressors use non detergent oil for lubrication along with a whole bunch of nasty chemicals to keep the tanks from rusting.
 

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My business removes tanks and boilers......whenever I get a job to remove an old water tank it is always galvanized....
I never have my men use torches on them...either a reciprocating saw, grinding wheel, both of which still raise small amounts of fumes from the heat...or shears....that stuff is deadly when burned...don't even try to rescue it....it is scrap

Aside from that your smoke pipe is way too small...that looks like 2" pipe and you have no draft regulator on what should be the breaching
 

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Welcome to MTF... strange first post for a tractor forum but glad to meet you.

That said... the guys are right. Kill that thing before it kills you. Unsafe at any speed.
 

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Please forgive my youthful ignorance, but what does that 2" pipe do? Seems like the 8" (or so) chimney should go into a 2nd barrel above the stove and that should be your heat exchanger (see also Northern Tool & Equipment barrel stove kit for design inspiration).
As for the smoke - Do you have any draft control (incoming combustion air or chimney flue)? You want a good steady smolder with mild flame. Looks like you almost have a blast furnace. What kind of wood are you burning? How wet is it? The type of wood you burn along with its condition and moisture content makes a huge difference.
 

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OK...clicking around I can see the pictures now and I see the smoke pipe and draft regulator at the back of the set up....the heat is rising to the highest point inside the combustion chamber and by having that into it that far you are not allowing the smoke out...and there is no way the steel of the tank will continue to withstand the fire, causing the fire to spread to the building.....wrong materials, bad design...get rid of it before someone gets hurt
 

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Welcome to MTF, were you will always get the unvarnished truth lol! You put some work into that!

It might be too late, he hasn't replied back for a bit. Hey, I call dibs on his Rigid Bandsaw in the background! ☹
 
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If you want to use an old tank it must be used vertical.
Ash door down the bottom with one or two charge doors between 1/3 the height and the bottom.
As for worrying about Metal Fume Feaver it should not be a problem.
While Zinc fume is dangerous, and should be avoided , it is not that dangerous.
OH&S regulations are written to protect employers from Californian law sharks , not employees health .
There is a big difference between the oxide coming off an electric weld with a puddle around the 2000 C mark & a wood stove .
There is also a big difference between being hunched over the source and sitting 10' away from the heater .

Burners should be at the opposite end to the flue and this applies triple if it is a forced air burner.
Your fans are blowing the smoke to the charge door end where it can not escape unless you put a full length baffle so the air goes along the bottom of the cylinder then past the door and back along the top to the flue , which is the closest to ideal you will get using your set up
 

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Think his idea was to burn the gases from the fire in the first tank and produce more heat. Cutting the pipe off in the fire box and letting the second compartment do its job would be an improvement.
I have tried that part of the design and it doesn't work. Sounds good in theory just does not work. Gasses prevented cold air intake required for combustion. The fans would be better utilized moving hot air from the stove into the room.
Other wise I agree fully with #9.
The top tank has to be hot for the flue to draft correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, first off it was an extremely poor idea to use ANY galvanized metal in the construction. Galvanized metal uses zinc which when heated gives off fumes that will make you sick. Second, it appears that you don't have adequate draw out whatever chimney you have.

Another question is what did you use to clean the tank and other materials. Compressors use non detergent oil for lubrication along with a whole bunch of nasty chemicals to keep the tanks from rusting.
Thanks for the reply.we have used galvanized well casing pipe for years for chimneys. never been sick. We didn't clean the tank. It was already Cleaned by the time we obtained it.yea, I kinda figured it doesn,t have enuff draw. I need to figure out how tocorect it. Now do you have and positive suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
[Q
My business removes tanks and boilers......whenever I get a job to remove an old water tank it is always galvanized....
I never have my men use torches on them...either a reciprocating saw, grinding wheel, both of which still raise small amounts of fumes from the heat...or shears....that stuff is deadly when burned...don't even try to rescue it....it is scrap

Aside from that your smoke pipe is way too small...that looks like 2" pipe and you have no draft regulator on what should be the breaching
The small pipe runs from a fan thru the middle of the barrel to collect heat and back into the burn chamber. All chimney pipe is 6 inch

QUOTE="Country1966?, post: 12531468, member: 551341"]
Welcome to MTF, were you will always get the unvarnished truth lol! You put some work into that!

It might be too late, he hasn't replied back for a bit. Hey, I call dibs on his Rigid Bandsaw in the background! ☹
[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
[Q

The small pipe runs from a fan thru the middle of the barrel to collect heat and back into the burn chamber. All chimney pipe is 6 inch

QUOTE="Country1966?, post: 12531468, member: 551341"]
Welcome to MTF, were you will always get the unvarnished truth lol! You put some work into that!

It might be too late, he hasn't replied back for a bit. Hey, I call dibs on his Rigid Bandsaw in the background! ☹
[/QUOTE]
Good morning and thank you. I go to bed early so I never saw any replies last night.
As for the ridgid band saw, they have made in China parts and are junk. The weak link is the adjuster for the top wheel. It is made of pot metal. I did find a replacement made if cast iron. It has been ordered and is on the way. Thank you again
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What dia. is your pipe through the roof? How far above the roof is it?
Pipe has an 8 inch double walled pipe with the actual flue pipe being 6 inches. There is about 30 inches that is Thru the roof sticking out about roof line
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Please forgive my youthful ignorance, but what does that 2" pipe do? Seems like the 8" (or so) chimney should go into a 2nd barrel above the stove and that should be your heat exchanger (see also Northern Tool & Equipment barrel stove kit for design inspiration).
As for the smoke - Do you have any draft control (incoming combustion air or chimney flue)? You want a good steady smolder with mild flame. Looks like you almost have a blast furnace. What kind of wood are you burning? How wet is it? The type of wood you burn along with its condition and moisture content makes a huge difference.
2 inch pipe forces preheated air by means of a fan into burn chamber. Exhausted pipe is all 6in. I do have a chimney damper. It is wide open. I plugged the two 1-1/2 inch pipes below the door, flames and smoke were shooting out of it. The door has (2) 2-1/2 inch pipes that feed air into burn chamber via ammo can and squirrel cage fan. I use oak and hickory 2 year seasoned slabs. Thank you
 

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When I had wood stoves the fan had a balanced steel flap in front of it that when the fan was on would open and let the air in, when the fan shut down the flap closed to keep smoke and heat from coming back through to the fan. Also there was a door seal around the entire door:

2486903
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If you want to use an old tank it must be used vertical.
Ash door down the bottom with one or two charge doors between 1/3 the height and the bottom.
As for worrying about Metal Fume Feaver it should not be a problem.
While Zinc fume is dangerous, and should be avoided , it is not that dangerous.
OH&S regulations are written to protect employers from Californian law sharks , not employees health .
There is a big difference between the oxide coming off an electric weld with a puddle around the 2000 C mark & a wood stove .
There is also a big difference between being hunched over the source and sitting 10' away from the heater .

Burners should be at the opposite end to the flue and this applies triple if it is a forced air burner.
Your fans are blowing the smoke to the charge door end where it can not escape unless you put a full length baffle so the air goes along the bottom of the cylinder then past the door and back along the top to the flue , which is the closest to ideal you will get using your set up
We used respirators while welding the galvanized pipe in a wide open area.i am trying to understand your reply. I have easy access to slabs . cheap too. I cut them 4 ft and the idea is to push coals forward and add more slabs as needed. . The small pipe was going to be a fresh air intake using a small inline duct fan. Preheating air thru top barrel and feeding into the top front of burn chamber. Room temp air is fed by a small squirrel cage fan in thru the door via ammo can and( 2) 2-1/2 PIPES. I would appreciate a little more explanation. I don't have time or resources to start over. Once I get it burning and hot it burns clean out the chimney. Just alot of smoke getting to that point thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #19
When I had wood stoves the fan had a balanced steel flap in front of it that when the fan was on would open and let the air in, when the fan shut down the flap closed to keep smoke and heat from coming back through to the fan. Also there was a door seal around the entire door:

View attachment 2486903
I do have a seal around the door. It only smokes when open. The flap is a good idea. I am going to redo the ammo can and fan on the door. Maybe replace the door with a dif. Design
OK...clicking around I can see the pictures now and I see the smoke pipe and draft regulator at the back of the set up....the heat is rising to the highest point inside the combustion chamber and by having that into it that far you are not allowing the smoke out...and there is no way the steel of the tank will continue to withstand the fire, causing the fire to spread to the building.....wrong materials, bad design...get rid of it before someone gets hurt
Awesome. When I clean out the stove ash after it has cooled I will crawl up inside and cut the pipe off. Thank you for the input
 

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Just a couple of thoughts come to mind. Bear in mind that I might not have understood the entire set up you have. Just delete thesw if you have already addressed the issues.

The flue exit in side the burn chamber should be at, or very close to the highest point in the burn chamber, othewise you are allowing heat/gases to accumulate in the top of the burn chamber before they can exit via the flue. Could be the flow is stalled and or circling around the top of the burn chamber before going against the natural flow, having to push downward to find the flue exit.

The burn chamber has to have at least a little more draw capacity up the flue than the feed air coming in. Not sure how your fans are arranged, but if there is any situation where there is more incoming air flow than exiting gases, the flow is
going to back up in the burn chamber and it is going to puff smoke.

Very interesting project. I bet with a little adjusment here and there, it is going to work just great. Let us know if you find out how to correct it.
 
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