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I recently inhereted a Cub Cadet 2166 mower with 187 hours and took it out for a mow last week. After about 30 minutes of mowing the machine stalled out. I checked the fuel filter and there wasn't any gas in it so I assumed that I needed to replace the filter and did. I also verified that the fuel line to the tank was clear by blowing through it. I had the same issue again after running the machine for approx 30 minutes. This time I replaced the air filter.... Same issue again after 30 minutes. It feeld like the machine is getting really hot prior to stallling out.

Does anyone have any insight on this issue?

Thanks for you help....

Patrick
 

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:Welcome1: and check your fuel cap vent hole and make sure it's clear. My neighbor just went through this with his 2185. We took the cowling off and the cooling fins were plugged with dirt & grime. We used an air hose first then took a pressure washer and cleaned it really good. We also found debris in around the deck spindles and cleaned out under the deck replaced the blades as they were shot along with new spark plugs, air, gas & oil filters, It runs cooler now and starts much easier. He inherited this from the previous owner with 371 hours on it and still with the OEM filters and plugs. This poor tractor has taken a beating and is still going strong. We ordered a new trans filter and oil also. Good luck slkpk
 

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If it is the vent hole in the gas cap as slkpk said the reason it seems hot is as it begins to have trouble getting fuel it starts to lean out, making for a hot engine. It may also have a weak fuel pump combined with the dirty cap.

Or just a dirty tractor, as slkpk also said.:fing32:

Not everyone uses aftermarket filters and plugs. Some have enough money (heh) to use OEM filters and plugs (and oil). I think the shops, both tractor and engine, have a way of identifying as delivered consumables, especially in warranty disputes. I think the break-in oil is easily identifiable.

Ted
 

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Hi Patrick, :Welcome1:

Hard to believe we are up to 13K members! Everything sounds like what others have said. That 2166 was the tractor I longed for when I first started looking. Its a great unit. Keep it clean and well cared for and it will last a long time. Make sure to clean out under the deck a few times a year, that deck comes off and on lickedy split, so take care of it and its gonna last. Glad you found this great forum.
 

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Make sure it is not cloged with grass and dirt under the battery area where the drive shaft hooks to the intake also check the screen below the dash.You should be able to feel the air moving through the screen down below the parking brake release and cruise control lever.
 

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chicks mow my yard...
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after changing hydro-filter, it'd be a good time to clean the fins on the hydrostat itself. the fins tend to collect dirt, grass, grease. this heat transfer blockage will cause the hydrostat to get hot and wear out sooner....
 

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After about 30 minutes of mowing the machine stalled out. I had the same issue again after running the machine for approx 30 minutes. Same issue again after 30 minutes. It feeld like the machine is getting really hot prior to stallling out.

Does anyone have any insight on this issue?
I've been following this thread for the last week and can share my 30 minute stall out story with my 15 yr old 2185.

I've been experiencing this same issue over the last few weeks. I tried the loosen gas cap fix, even drilled a few tiny holes in the cap hoping for the solution and neither worked.

I found a "mobile" tractor service guy in the area who came out to see if he could solve my problem. First thing he did with the tractor cold was check compression and all was well. He then took both side shrouds off and told me to have at it with cutting the grass to get it to shut down on me.

I was convinced it would shut off within 30 minutes or so. I pushed the tractor as hard as possible and 45 minutes later it was still running strong. The tech felt the fuel filter and thought it was hotter than he usually sees and believes that by having the shrouds off enough additional cooling was taking place that my problem was solved.

He felt that with everything buttoned up when the unit got hot enough a vapor lock was created in the fuel system that goes away once cooled down. When I think back over all the years I have owned this I do seem to recall that on exceptionally hot days I would occasionally have the shut down. Why it is more of an issue now than years ago I can't figure out.

So I'll be running naked for the duration in the heat of the summer, and put the clothes back on in the fall.
 

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I found a "mobile" tractor service guy in the area who came out to see if he could solve my problem. First thing he did with the tractor cold was check compression and all was well. He then took both side shrouds off and told me to have at it with cutting the grass to get it to shut down on me.

The tech felt the fuel filter and thought it was hotter than he usually sees and believes that by having the shrouds off enough additional cooling was taking place that my problem was solved.

He felt that with everything buttoned up when the unit got hot enough a vapor lock was created in the fuel system that goes away once cooled down.
I think the engineers at these GT companies are off the beam big time. They have done everything possible to trap heat inside a plastic box with great success.

Take a look at real farm tractor design past and present.

-Hoods made of metal, not plastic

-open sides to let the heat out

-mufflers outside the heat box.

Take a look at current GT design

-Plastic hoods

-enclosed sides

-mufflers inside the heat box

-extra heat shields to block heat dispersion and not melt the plastic hood. Resulting in hot, hot engines and PTO's.

I think the best thing you could do for one of these new GT's is to rip the plastic hood off, pull off the heat shields, redo the exhast and get the muffler outside the engineered plastic heat box. Have a new sheet metal hood with no sides fabricated at a local shop. While you are at it have a metal oil valve installed to replace the plastic valve they seem to love even though it's not functional for oil changes.

But what do I know. Someone will tell me I would be voiding the warrenty by changing the design operating temp of this or that. Never could figure out how it was Ok for the GT Co's to just add/retrofit their designs by adding /modifying the heat shields to existing engines (trapping more heat to stop the hood from melting) but if you did something to reduce the extreem heat you would be voiding the warrenty. Could it be that these new designs are to insure the machine will be dead in 5-6 years and they can sell you a new one, kinda sad to be thinking that way.

Am I nuts or would you think a cool engine and PTO would outlast cooked ones. Is there no room for common sense in today's world.
 

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Yup,manufactures These Days Want To See Anything Last
Makes Them Cringe When They See The Old Stuff Still Running
I Ways Always Told To Keep You Engine Running Cool -makes Them Last.
 

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I think the engineers at these GT companies are off the beam big time. They have done everything possible to trap heat inside a plastic box with great success.

Take a look at real farm tractor design past and present.

-Hoods made of metal, not plastic

-open sides to let the heat out

-mufflers outside the heat box.



.

Like this?


 

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RIGHT:fing32:​
 

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Like this?


Exactly like that. Now that is a well thought out design from back when they designed tractors to last. Now, what were they thinking. could it be that they were trying to keep the engine cool by letting the heat escape? Makes me wonder if I could pick up a old real (metal) hood and grill from a parts tractor and actually do this retro fit. Think I'll get some measurements. I always thought the old cubs and other companies older designs looked like real tractors as opposed to the new design plastic lawn mower style being put out now with cheap cost being the overriding factor in design. The only difficult part would be the muffler relocation. Maybe if I used an old cub hood and grill they wouldn't void my new cub warrenty, fat chance. CC would probably would want to make sure I cooked my engine and PTO thoughly for the 3 year warrenty period.

Come on, this is not rocket science, it's time to demand better. But how do you do that in today's environment, no-one is listening or cares and they want to sell you another "new and improved plastic model" in 5 years. We have entered into the age of disposable GT's like plastic bic cig lighters no more rugged old zippo's being made either.
 

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chicks mow my yard...
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if you wanted to go steel hood, you could probably make an earlier 2000 series fit. problem would be finding a donor 2000 series that isn't still cutting grass.....
 

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all the cars trucks and GT's are made to fail after so long. its truly sad they dont make em the way they used to. But I guess they know how to stay in business. jsut give the customer a new tractor and tell em to come back in a couple years.
 

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chicks mow my yard...
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cars and trucks aren't made to fail. they are made to compete with global competition. truth is, engines last longer than they ever did back in the day, but, everything that is not super-critical is made as cheaply as possible to remain competitive.

a friend of mine has a '94 subura w/300k miles. another friend has a '95 silverado with 276k miles.... my '80 chevy has close to 220k miles but has had two engines, two transmissions, etc...

i don't think cub engineered the GT to fail. more like it was engineered on the cheap and probably by modern mechanical engineers. the kind that can't tell a metric crescent wrench from a standard one.... the kind that can't figure out how to connect the air hose to an impact wrench. i know lots of 'em....
 

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Patrick, if you are seeing no fuel in the inline filter after it dies, that's your #1 concern. Like the other fellers say, loosen the gas cap and listen for a slight vacuum whoosh type sound. The tractor should then start right back up. Still no start, I'd think your fuel pump is shot. The fuel pumps are just simple vac/pulse diaphragm pumps that grab their 'pulse' power from a rubber line plumbed to the crank-case. The plastic cases on these pumps can warp and loose seal (especially with temp extremes), at which point they will stop pumping.

Joel
 

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If plastic is the issue, along with heat and a closed engine compartment, then go for a restored older CC, like I did. They are very reasonably priced. I picked mine up for $700, and have since spent money on a new starter, solenoid, and ignition. It needed new front tires, but I considered that to be routine maintenance. Altogether, I have about $850 in it. They come up for sale, frequently, on craigslist. i wish that I had a dozen of them. At worst, if you need to replace a motor, they aren't that expensive, and everything is easy to get ot and clean. I could not have more faith in my old 128. It runs like a clock. Parts are easy to get. Best -
 

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Better take a look again at todays farm tractors.The hoods are not metal they are plastic.All the John Deere line all the way up to the 9000 series and have been for several years now.They did this to make a lift up hood to get to the engine easy.When they were metal it was just to much weight so they were bolted down and had to be removed to work on the engine.Plastic hoods are a good thing.Besides a Cub Cadet 2166 has a metal hood so there goes the engine run cooler under metal theory.
 
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