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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Cub Cadet 2155 won't idle. I replaced the carb, fuel pump, spark plug, and ignition coil. Also check the fuel lines and filter. It seems to be a problem with the governor or linkage. When I turn the throttle all the way down, even when the engine off, I would expect the governor to allow the carb throttle to settle back to the idle set pin, but it doesn't. I can push it back with my hand manually, and the tractor will properly idle. One thing to note, is that when I manually push the governor idle back, it does squeak some. I tried some silicon spray, but it didn't seem to make a difference. Questions:
1) With the engine not running, should the governor settle back to idle position without help of any external spring? It seems to go about half way.
2) Is my linkage from the governor arm to the carburetor correct? It seems like there is a useless spring there that is connected between 2 fixed points. I have attached a picture of the linkage and the spring.

I have also attached a picture of where the governor connects to the governor arm.

Any ideas?
2478116


2478117



Any help would be appreciated

Frank
 

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In a properly operating governor based small engine system, the only connection between the carburetor and the dash mounted throttle lever is the spring that runs between them. Adjust the governor according to the service manual and then set high RPM according to the service manual. You will need an electronic induction tachometer to do this accurately, they are only $9 on ebay.

From what I'm getting from your description, you could possibly have a broken internal governor. Possibly one of the spinning weights has broken off. How many hours on the engine?

Welcome to the forum, there is an amazing amount of collective knowledge at your fingertips here. Be humble and respectful and we will all do our best to help.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In a properly operating governor based small engine system, the only connection between the carburetor and the dash mounted throttle lever is the spring that runs between them. Adjust the governor according to the service manual and then set high RPM according to the service manual. You will need an electronic induction tachometer to do this accurately, they are only $9 on ebay.

From what I'm getting from your description, you could possibly have a broken internal governor. Possibly one of the spinning weights has broken off. How many hours on the engine?

Welcome to the forum, there is an amazing amount of collective knowledge at your fingertips here. Be humble and respectful and we will all do our best to help.

Bill
Thanks,

The engine only has about 150 hours on it. The throttle is connected to the arm on the governor by a spring, but one end of it slides through the hole on the arm when I take the throttle to idle. It seems like the governor is to settle to idle on its own in this case, but it doesn't seem to be doing that. If I force the arm with my hand, it seems to settle to idle nicely.

I have attached and incredible piece of hand art to convey.

Thanks,

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks,

The engine only has about 150 hours on it. The throttle is connected to the arm on the governor by a spring, but one end of it slides through the hole on the arm when I take the throttle to idle. It seems like the governor is to settle to idle on its own in this case, but it doesn't seem to be doing that. If I force the arm with my hand, it seems to settle to idle nicely.

I have attached and incredible piece of hand art to convey.

Thanks,

Frank
Sorry, same picture 3 times.
 

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Frank, it seems you need to adjust the governor arm on the governor shaft. The "hand art" is a good explanation, there should always be "pull" tension on that spring.

Bill
 

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So here is how a govenor works. When the engine is running, The govenor is always trying to slow the engine to an idle. To make the engine rev higher, you use spring tension to force the throttle to move to a higher setting. As the engine begins to increase in rpm, the govenor continues to increase its force untill it is equal with the spring.

To test the govenor, remove all linkages and springs from it. Then fire up the engine and control the trottle with you hand. As you do this, try to move the govenor. When you are trying to move the govenor, you should feel resistance. As you increase the rpms, the govenor should push against you even more. If the govenor produces no pressure, then something is faulty inside the engine
 
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