My Tractor Forum banner
  • We have a new contest celebrating your backyard. Sponsored by Walmart, its your chance to win a $400 gift just in time for the 4th of July! HERE Contest Ends on the 30th.

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Tractorites-
I am having difficulty keeping my transaxle belt on as it wants to ride up and over the rear transaxle pulley. The only thing I can see that I could be doing wrong is in the brake adjustment as I do not have the recommended 1 1/2 inches of spring compression when engaged. Furthermore I cannot see any way of getting this to be 1 1/2 inches without using a piece of pipe as a sleeve over the brake rod.
Any body ever encounter either problem ? I am sure they are related. I put on a $36 belt today to have it jump, get stuck between the transaxle pulley and the trans, melting away. Before I realized I was not burning oil but rubber, the belt seemed pretty toasted.:banghead:fing20: so I thought I would ask somebody smarter.
I have the Drive schematic viewed from left side of tractor. Everything looks good there, but as you press the brake which really isn't a brake but engages the idle taking all the tension out of the belt. It seems that even when brake isn't engaged I have too much slack.
Poor money and tall grass- any help, pictures would be gratefully accepted
 

·
Cranky Motorsports
Joined
·
15,275 Posts
sounds like your belt is too wide. the brake issue... Hmm Not sure on that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,982 Posts
There should be a couple spring keepers positioned around the pully that helps keep the belt on when the clutch is pushed in, also, worn idler or clutch pullies will throw the belt off track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
Are your replacement belts the exact part from Sears or are they a cross-referenced part from another source?

Belt type and size are critical in these applications. All belts should be of a type specified for agriculture or outdoor equipment and, especially, for clutching applications. That typically means the belt is kevlar reinforced.

You also need a belt that's flexible. Of course, all drive belts are flexible, but your belt has a couple of twists in it. That means that a regular belt might not be making the twists in the allotted space and could be rubbing on keepers, pulley edges, or other items. Ag and outdoor belts typically are quite limber in that regard.

Also note that the belt must be placed in proper orientation in the flat and V-pulleys--that is, it's "upside down", so to speak, in the flat idler with the normal upper or outside surface of the belt running on the idler and the inner Vee of the belt exposed. It also must get into those orientations by twisting it in the correct direction, but I can't advise you what that is for your system.

Size is key, and it's not just length, but also the cross-section size, meaning both width and depth.

Beyond that, the suggestion to observe the belt in operation was a good one, but be very careful and wear eye protection! Look for any abnormality over the path of the belt. If you can jack the tractor up safely, run it with the drive wheels being driven. Look especially for rubbing on belt keepers--that can come from damaged or bent keepers, slightly wrong alignment of keepers or loose ones, or overly slack belt.

Check the operation of the clutching idler and the brake components. If you can't make the 1-1/2" adjustment, it seems to me that there are two sources for that problem and one of those might be the belt itself. If the belt is limiting the pedal motion because it doesn't fit correctly, is installed wrong, or is the wrong size, etc., it could limit the movement you are trying to adjust. Of course, I would think the belt should be in its most-slack position with the parking brake engaged, so it shouldn't be the problem, but it's worth checking. If the belt isn't affecting it, look at the mechanical components that engage that adjustment assembly to see where the limitation is occurring.

Although I can't help with removing the pulley (you might need to pull the transaxle), if it's debris you want to get rid of, you might be able to just blow it out with compressed air.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks MTF,
I will try these suggestions. The belt is mfg. or at least bought at Sears at their recommendation at parts warehouse. Orientation is correct, flat to flat, v to v. I replaced transaxle pulley last year due to a nick so it is a good reminder to check my idlers and fan rotor.

I am a tool and die maker and I usually see these things-but everyone misses the simple things. I'll let you know.:praying:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Finally able to get under there. It looks like the pulleys cannot mechanically come into a taunt position on the belt. There do not appear to be any stop blocks but in the home position, which should bring my belt in taunt, I seem to stop prior to having full belt engagement.
Since everything is tied to the frame and it is a multi frame, I am going to loosen some screws and see if I can get more movement out of the brake. Over the years it has hit some pretty good bumps and perhaps I need an adjustment. I will keep you posted until she runs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
Whoa, there!

Let's revisit that belt: You said:
The belt is mfg. or at least bought at Sears at their recommendation at parts warehouse.
So which was it: Bought at Sears or not bought at Sears? Original factory part or other brand/other part number?

It doesn't sound like an original part: To me, it sounds like a cross-referenced part and that puts you in unknown territory. There's a good chance you have the wrong belt! (Hey, I've been down that road and it's very hard to get to the end!)

So, before you beat yourself over the head trying to make adjustments you just can't properly make, I suggest you pursue just what belt you have and is it the correct one. If it is, then work on the adjustments. If it isn't, well you know what you need to do first!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have the only belt Sears is selling for that Model. I cannot discern if it is the original part, I can only assume it is if it is a Craftsman part, unless you know of a different way of checking this item #. If so please post, I would be glad to learn.
So far I found a bent linkage and have ordered that part. The linkage maintains the 1 1/2 " on the brake pedal, which also is what engages the idle for the transaxle. So I am awaiting the linkage before moving farther.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
I have the only belt Sears is selling for that Model. I cannot discern if it is the original part, I can only assume it is if it is a Craftsman part, unless you know of a different way of checking this item #..
Aaahh, . . . That's different from your previous post. If it is the OEM part, sold by Sears using the part number specified for your machine, then that's pretty much as good as you can do there and it should be OK.

So far I found a bent linkage and have ordered that part. The linkage maintains the 1 1/2 " on the brake pedal, which also is what engages the idle for the transaxle. So I am awaiting the linkage before moving farther.
Another Aaahh, . . . :congrats:

Finding a defective or damaged part is good progress. Before you put it back into service after replacing the part, go thru the service info in your User Manual and do all of the recommended services, including lubricating, tensioning, etc.

Also, beating in mind that pulley "nick", check out everything else below decks for damage, as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It was the linkage and the distance between the Bracket torque RH. I had to press the brake/ starting pedal so far that it positioned the idle pulley 90 to its operating position. When I dropped the pedal back into position to run, which also would put tension on the belt, it would slip off the idler. So the brake adjustment of 1 1/2 inches is crucial. I also could not find out why, even after a new linkage why I couldn't reduce it to less than 3", but I cut a piece of pipe and used it as a spacer. Ran it all weekend, cut grass and hauled branches and tree stumps on a trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
. . . So the brake adjustment of 1 1/2 inches is crucial. I also could not find out why, even after a new linkage why I couldn't reduce it to less than 3", but I cut a piece of pipe and used it as a spacer. . .
I am not sure what your linkage looks like, but all of these things are crucial for clutching applications.

Try to measure the belt you bought, both length and cross-section (see my previous posts), and write it down in a safe place (I often use stickies on the parts listing in the manual). Write down exactly which dimension you measure (e.g., overall length outside) for each measurement. It will save you when you get to NLA parts!

Congrats on the fix! :trink39:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top