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Discussion Starter #1
I decided to purchase one of the CMI 2 ton dump trailers after reading favorable reviews. So, I will give some feedback on my experience.

First of all the paint job was pathetic. I do not mean spots that may have rubbed off on shipment. There are several places that if you rub your hand over the metal the paint just flakes off. Obviously the metal was never cleaned or prepped before spraying. There are also many spots that the paint is so thin that you can see the grey metal. I know this is a farm/yard implement, but I expected better.

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CMI supplies precut pressure treated 1 x 6 for the floor and sides. The small ripped filler piece for the bottom should have been 1.0 inch wider. As you can see in the pics, this would not hold dirt/sand or small gravel very well.

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The wheels that were supplied have roller bearings on the inside that are greaseable with a zerk fitting. The interesting thing about this type of bearing is that the rollers are directly on the axle shaft. The axle shaft is just soft colled rolled steel. They should have a least been case hardened.

It waits to be seen, but I do not think that it will take long before the soft axles will have grooves in them.


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Overall the weld quality was good. I have not had a chance to use it with a load. It cycles up and down smoothly with a steep enough angle to dump anything that I would put in it.

One of the reasons that I bought this trailer was that it was made in the U.S. I am not impressed with the quality. I also own 2 of the Harbor Freight trailers that I am sure everyone is familiar with. One I use as a water wagon and another as a small barn yard trailer. Both of these after several years do not have a paint problem.

Even with the issues I am keeping a open mind and can't wait to start using it. I will report back after I give it a workout.

Maybe mine was made on Monday!!!!!

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Another interesting thing is,.... If you manufactured this trailer and were proud of it, wouldn't you put your name on it? somewhere? Yup, no tag, no sticker, no stenciled name anyplace.


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And then some people wonder why jobs go abroad or go out of business. slkpk
 

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Just another example of why whenever I need a piece of equipment my first thought is 'Can I build it?' not 'Where can I buy it?'!!

Too often it seems the only way to ensure you have quality is to build it yourself. Yes, I know some very good places exist (Bro-tek, etc.) but they seem to be getting fewer.
 

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One thing I did was to install a piece of metal roofing under the center floor boards. Just barely visible in this pic. I wanted to help keep sand/dirt from falling thru the floor board cracks onto the extended cylinder shaft.


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I Love All Color Tractors
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Very good idea! That should protect it nicely. :fing32:
 

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Etced,

First, thank you for sharing. I have had my eye on one of these trailers for some time and your information will be very helpful in making my decision.

I must say that I am disappointed with your experience. I have viewed these trailers (based on their website information) to be a very good value at their price, but then I was assuming excellent quality workmanship. One would expect better on a piece of equipment like this. The paint problem and improperly fitted floor boards are just plain sloppy workmanship. The one thought I had regarding the floor boards is that perhaps they meant for all the boards to be spaced slightly apart which would account for the larger space in the middle if the boards are butted against each other. This would cause problems leaking sand or dirt but would also allow drainage of water and would prevent the boards for buckling if there is any warpage. If this is true I would think that there would be instructions indicating this.

I have been attracted to Country Manufacturing trailers because there is a real void in the market for trailers of this size. There is very little selection between the stamped tin lawn trailers sold by Sears, TSC, etc (useless for more than hauling a few leaves IMO) and full size farm trailers. With the rise in compact tractors and ATV's used for rural homesteads and hobby farms the Country Manufacturing line of trailers really appeals.

I'm glad you found the quality of the welding to be good. While the paint and floor board issues are disappointing they are relatively easy to correct compared to real structural issues. I share your concern about the use of roller bearings for wheel bearings. I understand that roller bearings will reduce the size and cost of the hub assemblies but are roller bearings really well suited to this type of duty?

Have you expressed your problems and concerns to the company? While I think it is unfortunate that these issues should exist in the first place perhaps the feedback will prompt them to pay more attention to their workmanship. They may even find a way to compensate you for your disappointment. It's one thing to have a problem like this, but how they respond to feedback is perhaps even more revealing.

Please keep us updated on how well your trailer works for you. I hope you will be well pleased with its performance. Your experience and updates here will have a strong bearing on my decision to purchase a Country Manufacturing trailer in the future.

JN
 

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As a woodworker and having built several decks, I think the problem with the floorboards is just shrinkage. I would bet that when the floorboards were cut they were the correct width, but by the time they have set in the lot for awhile and then got shipped to you they have shrunk, pressure treated wood is notorious for this. CMI probably needs to increase there stock of floorboard wood so that it can pre-shrink before it gets cut and shipped to the customer. Cutting the deck boards should be the last thing they do before shipping it off to the customer.

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You could of course, case harden the axles yourself. Just get a good hot charcoal fire going and put the end of the axles in it. Wait until the axles are thoroughly heat soaked and then quench them in a bucket of water. Not a very scientific method, but it sure will be effective.
steve
 

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I think the problem with the floorboards is just shrinkage.
Ah, good point! I agree that the wood you buy these days is extremely 'wet' and subject to shrinkage. Preshrinking the planks would help prevent that and they could also measure the wood prior to shipping and rip the filler plank to adjust if necessary.

I'm not a metallurgist so bear with me, but would hardening the axles like described above make them more brittle and subject to breaking?

JN
 

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The steel of those cold rolled axles will have enough carbon in them to harden, I don't know if they would harden to the point of becoming brittle, I suspect that they would just case harden slightly which would support the bearing surface but not significantly change the use of the axle. I am not a metalurgist, just an old country boy who used to heat treat homemade wrenches and pry bars on the farm.

steve
 

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Etced,

I understand that roller bearings will reduce the size and cost of the hub assemblies but are roller bearings really well suited to this type of duty?

Have you expressed your problems and concerns to the company? While I think it is unfortunate that these issues should exist in the first place perhaps the feedback will prompt them to pay more attention to their workmanship. They may even find a way to compensate you for your disappointment. It's one thing to have a problem like this, but how they respond to feedback is perhaps even more revealing.

JN
Cylindrical rolling element bearings have a very high load carrying capability compared to other types of rolling elements (ball, spherical roller and tapered roller) due to the much larger area that they cover and the greater number of elements actually carrying the load at a given time. Think "U-joint'' on your truck drive shaft and consider the loads that they carry and how big the needles are. For the same width, the only style of ''bearing'' that will carry a larger load is a bushing and sleeve due to their even greater surface coverage.

A set of tapered roller bearings, eg. travel trailer wheel bearings, will actually put a higher load per square inch on the axle surface due to their width. Cold rolled steel axles should survive a long time if no dirt gets in with the elements to do damage to the surface. Save the case hardening for something that actually needs it.

My concern might be with lateral loads, eg. a tandem axle trailer turning a corner where there is considerable sideways movement of the tires. Cylindrical roller bearings have very limited capabilities for dealing with those forces. This is the type of load where a tapered roller bearing shines, although at low (tractor type) speeds the stress levels are not that high or long in duration.
 

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Etced,
did you contact CMI and let them know of these problems? I have owned several pieces of equipment from them over the years and have found them to be very good at taking care of problems. Yes, the wood does shrink over a couple of weeks. It did on my trailer and they sent me what I needed to replace it at no charge.
I have had a 2 ton trailer for 3 years now hauling gravel, dirt and whatever and have not had any issues with the axles.
I think if you call them, they will make it right with you.
 
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