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Ok guys hopefully I'm not the only ignorant one around here, but what do you mean by "cookin the coil"?
 

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I had to bake mine (10323) once. Did it at 300 degrees for about 15 min. Worked like a charm! I could not believe it.
I sold the 10323 and hopefully the new owner has not had a problem.

MU
 

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It has worked for me like 4 out of 6 I've tried I usually put it in foil and set the oven to 275 for around 40 mins and it's holding pretty good on a 14.5 up twin cylinder briggs hope this helps
 

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At 200* you can cook that bad boy for an hour or more and not hurt it. That's in case you forget about it,to be safe...but anything will do. Gets the moisture out.
 

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just "cooked" a non working coil for my s21zsr (1991) LawnBoy for 2 hours at 200 degrees (I just wrapped the spark plug cable section in foil). So far it is now working like a charm!
 

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So, it's all about drying it out?

Nothing like reflowing solder (electronics) then?
 

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So, it's all about drying it out?

Nothing like reflowing solder (electronics) then?
Standard solders used in electronic components melt at around 365 degrees F. This method is just removing moisture but is effective nonetheless.
 

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I baked a coil off the V series Toro I recently picked up. Had sat in a damp environment for a few years. Tossed in some foil @ 275 for about 15 minutes. Was long enough to heat it up well and bake out the juice. Spark was/is nice-n-blue and still is.
 

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Is this bake-the-coil method only for the magneto coils, or does it work for the automotive style can coils as well? Just curious, hadn't seen an answer to this question in this thread.
 
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