My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone! I have a Craftsman Garden Tractor 917.273080.Bought it brand new.The 22 hp Kohler has been trouble free.Great tractor. My confusion is with the snowblower attachments. Sears wants $1100.00 for the "new" 46" model-#486.24838-and according to Agri-fab its the only one that will fit it. I can buy, right now, a slightly used smaller Craftsman model,#486.24839 for $500.00 including the chains,weights ect. Will this fit? Is there a adapter for it? I've spent some serious time on the "net" and am getting mixed info. I turn my deepest ,darkest question over to you all..... "Will/can it fit"? HELP!
 

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts
you will be better off buying a sears suburban with a snowplow or snowblower. they can be had in good running working shape with a plow for $300. it will last longer and move more snow than your craftsman. where in mass are you? i will gladly look around for a good one
 

·
The Magnificent
Joined
·
20,952 Posts
The two surely look interchangeable. At least from what I can tell on the sears.com/partsdirect site.

Why don't you load your tractor into your truck, with its front faced the rear of the truck. Drive over to the snowblower owner's house and see if it won't fit up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not a bad idea D-Dogg -except the "blower" is about a 1 1/2 hour away. I just wonder if anyone out there has run into the same problem.
 

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts
fordboy, i would seriously consider getting a suburban as a dedicated snow machine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hugh, Im in Northern Ma. A plow would be ok but a snowblower would be better for my property-no snowbanks up close to the house. Ive also looked around for a used tractor/snowblower combo.The attachment will take up less space.
 

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts
okay, ill spend a few minutes looking for ya
 

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts
Hey Hugh. How old of a machine is the Suburban? Do they have 2 stage blowers?
suburbans were 1966 to 1978-79 ish. there were never 2 stage snowblowers for them, but some kick *** single stage. user GT_80 has worked with one before, whereas i plow. im sure he can help you out
 

·
Deere 330 Killer
Joined
·
17,892 Posts
The Suburban must have some real guts to push snow. Lot of torque?
more than you can imagine. you will be blown away. my plow last year was an 8hp mini suburban, and with tire chains and wheel weights, i pushed a foot of snow no problem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
617 Posts
The Suburban must have some real guts to push snow. Lot of torque?
Actually, torque isn't much of an issue because, once you get a good pile of snow in front of the blade, even with chains and weights, you can probably spin the wheels.

You need to consider whether you have to push the snow very far (meaning you get lots of it being pushed with limited traction). If you can get a running start and, in a short distance, push it to an out of the way place, then you can get a path open for partial-width plowing. If you have a long drive (ours is 300 feet from front of house to street, plus a parking area alongside our side-load garage), you quickly get where you can't move the pile any more.

A snow thrower only has to move a little bit of snow at a time and once it's moved, it's out of the way for the duration. Snow doesn't build up in front of the machine (assuming you keep the chute clear and don't move to fast, of course), so traction is much less of a problem. Blowing wind is, of course, a nuisance, especially when it blows the snow back in your face!

My walk-behind snow thrower can clear our drive much faster than the tractor and blade if there's more than about five inches of snow. If there's only a couple of inches, the tractor is much faster and does a better job. There's something to be said for both approaches!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
903 Posts
Actually, torque isn't much of an issue because, once you get a good pile of snow in front of the blade, even with chains and weights, you can probably spin the wheels.

You need to consider whether you have to push the snow very far (meaning you get lots of it being pushed with limited traction). If you can get a running start and, in a short distance, push it to an out of the way place, then you can get a path open for partial-width plowing. If you have a long drive (ours is 300 feet from front of house to street, plus a parking area alongside our side-load garage), you quickly get where you can't move the pile any more.

A snow thrower only has to move a little bit of snow at a time and once it's moved, it's out of the way for the duration. Snow doesn't build up in front of the machine (assuming you keep the chute clear and don't move to fast, of course), so traction is much less of a problem. Blowing wind is, of course, a nuisance, especially when it blows the snow back in your face!

My walk-behind snow thrower can clear our drive much faster than the tractor and blade if there's more than about five inches of snow. If there's only a couple of inches, the tractor is much faster and does a better job. There's something to be said for both approaches!
Good post :fing32:

I think it does just depend on what your application is. I've got a pretty long drive way and enough room on either side to push the snow at an angle off to the side. Of course, last winter was way too much for the tractors even with weights and chains. Luckily I was able to borrow the skid steer from work :trink40:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top