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Twice I have tried to grow white clover...both times proved unsuccessful. The first time I threw it all around the yard about 1 week into an 8-weeks-long drought. I think that explains that. The second time, however, I should like to think I was a bit wiser, and worked my timing out a bit better. Still, nothing long-term. I did have spots of it, but they've all but died off.

I'm not sure what the trick is, presuming there IS a trick. But as badly as I wanted it, and considering the amount of money I put out, I just could not make it work.

From what I researched, there's a lot to be said for white clover, as others have mentioned. I liked it simply because I wouldn't have to waste time, money and energy on a yard that would win "The World's Least-Seen Lawn" contest.
 

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So Iv been kicking the idea and googling the idea of over seeding clover in my back yard. It trash anyway I let it grow, many weed and the soil is mostly gravel from an old alley way that’s no longer in use. Has any else thrown white clover in the mix or have any idea as to why this would be a bad idea?

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AWESOME! Seriously. There is a homesteading trend for folks to get as much clover planted and only to cut 4-inches or higher. WHY is that? To help SAVE the BEEs. Clover is one of the only things left in abundance for bees that 1. NON-GMO. 2. Not sprayed with chemicals.

Sir, I thank you for considering this undertaking.

Note, much of the bee population that pollinates clover are ideal to have as these little bees don't have aggression. I can lay in a bed of clover and just watch them hum all around doing what they do.

:tango_face_smile:
 

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AWESOME! Seriously. There is a homesteading trend for folks to get as much clover planted and only to cut 4-inches or higher. WHY is that? To help SAVE the BEEs. Clover is one of the only things left in abundance for bees that 1. NON-GMO. 2. Not sprayed with chemicals.

Sir, I thank you for considering this undertaking.

Note, much of the bee population that pollinates clover are ideal to have as these little bees don't have aggression. I can lay in a bed of clover and just watch them hum all around doing what they do.

:tango_face_smile:
:thThumbsU

yeah buddy save the bees! Or we all die. :tango_face_crying:
 

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Discussion Starter #26
AWESOME! Seriously. There is a homesteading trend for folks to get as much clover planted and only to cut 4-inches or higher. WHY is that? To help SAVE the BEEs. Clover is one of the only things left in abundance for bees that 1. NON-GMO. 2. Not sprayed with chemicals.



Sir, I thank you for considering this undertaking.



Note, much of the bee population that pollinates clover are ideal to have as these little bees don't have aggression. I can lay in a bed of clover and just watch them hum all around doing what they do.



:tango_face_smile:


The bees are just a added bonus. As for the mowing 4” or higher that’s a no go for me in the back. Like I said I have some clover in The grass beside the garage and I probably mow it twice a month and it’s vary rarely above 2.5” and I never mess with it


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Clover produces Nitrogen, the major ingredient in fertilizer. If you're like me, you'll have to mow a little lower to get rid of the seeds....unless you want your lawn to look like it just snowed. It's a tough lawn...great for kids to play on. However, not barefooted unless they like bee stings!
 

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I think the best way to get clover to spread is to wait until it goes to seed. Don't mulch it, but, with high lift blades (which is all I use), throw it as far as you can, effectively spreading it.
 

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Here’s what my little patch of clover planted between our pavers looks like after a mow. Not sure how we got it so thick other than I just ignored it for the first 2 months


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Here’s what my little patch of clover planted between our pavers looks like after a mow. Not sure how we got it so thick other than I just ignored it for the first 2 months


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The weedeater will take care of that.
 

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Here’s what my little patch of clover planted between our pavers looks like after a mow. Not sure how we got it so thick other than I just ignored it for the first 2 months
I use various types of moss between pavers... Other than a little water from time to time and an occasional weed to pull (rarely) they are zero maintenance and look nice.
 

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I have white clover (and dandelions) throughout my 2.25 acre lawn. In the front I mow every week, but in the back when the clover is in bloom I let it alone for two weeks at a time just for the honey and bumble bees. We have plenty of bees out where I live.

My backyard is a little over 1/2 acre and started out as a sloped, rock infested, clay mud slope. In 2010 (year we built our house) I carefully groomed it with a landscape rake after the excavator got done in the back. This got most of the rocks out of the soil and filled in the many ruts and drainage rills. Next I brought in a few tons of some organic material (compost, old leaves and such) and had my neighbor with a large tractor mounted 3 pt tiller till that in. Again I leveled it with the landscape rake, borrowed a seed spreader from same neighbor and used my Kubota BX2230 to spread a LOT of fescue grass seed. I covered the seed with many bales of hand spread straw, rolled that down with a roller, then after all that hard work, eagerly waited for the ground to spring to life... It never happened... We had a minor drought that year, interrupted by very brief, very heavy downpours that simply washed away the straw and seed. Then it would bake again. All I managed to get by fall was a back yard full of ruts and rills, with mostly weeds interrupted by a few blades of grass. I made another attempt the next spring. Everything was going great until June... That was the year we had 106 degree temperatures in JUNE, in KY! It simply baked the ground to brick. Later that summer/fall I was only able to re-do half of it due to traveling for work, but that half came up and looked good!

The next spring, due to work, I decided to let nature have the other half just to see how long it would take for it to fill in. What I have ended up with on that half is mostly white clover! I did not sow it. I guess it just blew in? It was interesting to watch the yard fill in year by year. Weeds, crab grass, and other normally bad things came first. By the second year, clumps of fescue and patches of white clover were showing. (I am surrounded by cattle grazing fields on all sides. ) By the 4th year the clover was starting to crowd out the weeds and the clumps of fescue were continuing to spread. Today, 9 years later, I still have a few small bare spots where nothing is growing but the clover is filling those in quickly. I like to get on Google earth and look at past images of my property. It is interesting to see the progression from bare dirt to green. So if you want clover, don't do anything, just let nature bring it in for you!
 

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I have a lot of clover around and I try to let it bloom for a while. But I have an area I need to do something with. It's primarily red rock gravel with a variety of green stuff mixed in that grows unevenly.

I tilled and raked some of it this spring, but didn't accomplish much. Once the heat breaks this Fall, I'll go at it again, starting with a middle buster to get deeper than the tiller did. I'm moving grass clippings into that area and will try to get some of my Oak leaves there once they drop. Neighbor will bring me some rotted manure/hay and I can get more from another neighbor.

By next Spring, hopefully it will be better.

Was thinking of trying to find some clover seed, but I may check with our extension office to see what they say.
 

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As I've said before, it really all depends on where one lives in the country as far as groundcovers go.
I'mnofarmer looks like he had great success with just allowing his property develop naturally. Looking back at older Google Maps pictures of where I live now, one can see that the land was completely cleared somewhere in 2008. When I bought the place in 2015, it had completely grown over and took over a year to clear once again.
The first pic is when I moved in and the second is after the third to last (of 7) burn piles. I found all kinds of stuff hidden from the normal old tyres to logs two feet in diameter and 20 feet long.
 

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I have white clover (and dandelions) throughout my 2.25 acre lawn. In the front I mow every week, but in the back when the clover is in bloom I let it alone for two weeks at a time just for the honey and bumble bees. We have plenty of bees out where I live.

My backyard is a little over 1/2 acre and started out as a sloped, rock infested, clay mud slope. In 2010 (year we built our house) I carefully groomed it with a landscape rake after the excavator got done in the back. This got most of the rocks out of the soil and filled in the many ruts and drainage rills. Next I brought in a few tons of some organic material (compost, old leaves and such) and had my neighbor with a large tractor mounted 3 pt tiller till that in. Again I leveled it with the landscape rake, borrowed a seed spreader from same neighbor and used my Kubota BX2230 to spread a LOT of fescue grass seed. I covered the seed with many bales of hand spread straw, rolled that down with a roller, then after all that hard work, eagerly waited for the ground to spring to life... It never happened... We had a minor drought that year, interrupted by very brief, very heavy downpours that simply washed away the straw and seed. Then it would bake again. All I managed to get by fall was a back yard full of ruts and rills, with mostly weeds interrupted by a few blades of grass. I made another attempt the next spring. Everything was going great until June... That was the year we had 106 degree temperatures in JUNE, in KY! It simply baked the ground to brick. Later that summer/fall I was only able to re-do half of it due to traveling for work, but that half came up and looked good!

The next spring, due to work, I decided to let nature have the other half just to see how long it would take for it to fill in. What I have ended up with on that half is mostly white clover! I did not sow it. I guess it just blew in? It was interesting to watch the yard fill in year by year. Weeds, crab grass, and other normally bad things came first. By the second year, clumps of fescue and patches of white clover were showing. (I am surrounded by cattle grazing fields on all sides. ) By the 4th year the clover was starting to crowd out the weeds and the clumps of fescue were continuing to spread. Today, 9 years later, I still have a few small bare spots where nothing is growing but the clover is filling those in quickly. I like to get on Google earth and look at past images of my property. It is interesting to see the progression from bare dirt to green. So if you want clover, don't do anything, just let nature bring it in for you!
I have repeated the second paragraph about 3 times in my life thus far. Done with it.

Let the clover run, baby!:tango_face_smile_bi
 

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Yep! Nature is far better at yard work than I am!
 

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I have a war on clover at my place, but only because I'm allergic to honeybees. I try not to have anything around the house that would attract a bee.

But, when we tried to establish clover in our pastures we'd always frost seed it. That meant broadcasting it in the late winter. The freeze / thaw cycles in late winter and spring would give it good seed to soil contact. It worked well. That's probably what I'd do, if I wanted clover in my lawn.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I use various types of moss between pavers... Other than a little water from time to time and an occasional weed to pull (rarely) they are zero maintenance and look nice.


That also sounds like a great alternative. God any pictures of some


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Nope... No photos and at the moment I don't have a camera to get any. Sorry.
 
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