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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a H60 Tecumseh which is on a JD tiller, it was given to me. It's a '74 which has had very little use. It spent a couple of years sitting behind a house trailer with a fallen tree on it, rain, snow, etc.

What's the best way to clean up the flywheel magnets, pickup (coil) etc. I'm thinking soak it well with PB Blaster which I have in the barn, let it meditate, then wire brush, blow dry, maybe do again, do some sanding?

Anyone who's been there with an engine this abused your input would be appreciated.

Trying to be as "genteel" with this as I can as you're all probably aware of how pricey Tec parts are.

Special thanks to Jim in Indiana who I met in this forum who has two of these tillers and is doing some long distance "hand holding" to help me.

Thanks for your time,

Ev
 

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Cranky Motorsports
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I always sanded the rust off with 100 grit sand paper. make sure none of the wires are broken, you may want to change the condensor if it has points and make sure the points aren't rusted together.
 

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2nd on GT's advice. On my Tecumseh I simply sanded off all the points of contact with sandpaper, it shouldn't take much effort. Points and condenser can be picked up cheaply at Tulsa Engine Warehouse.

http://tewarehouse.com/
 

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The rust on the armature and flywheel don't hurt anything as it works on magnetism. As long as the magnet isn't scraping the armature due to rust buildup it will be fine. Just make sure the points aren't rusty or go ahead and install new points and condenser right off the bat while you have the flywheel off.

Get it running first to see if any further cleaning up will be worth your time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses.

Popped the cover off and the points look brand new, in fact didn't even have to adjust them? I will replace the condensor as that looks pretty rough. While I have it off will shine up the magnets and pick up since it's apart. I did however give the points a good burnishing with a piece of thin cardboard as almost 40 years of oxidation couldn't be good.

Looking at the tines which look new but are very rusty, now the points which show no wear at all, I'm almost wondering if the oil I drained out of the engine was from '74? Scary, even back then "green paint" wasn't cheap.

Thanks again,

Ev
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Noticed this mag has an "oiler" as I think I remember these take only a drop or two of oil and then ONLY if they are dry? Last tune up I did on a distributor was a Farmall Super M and we sold that about 12 years ago. Any info on adding oil to the oiler beyond what I think I remember would be appreciated.

Did some reading online on magnets and rust, and mccarty is correct rust shouldn't be a problem. However, depending on how much rust it could (theoretically or in fact) affect field strength. There is a dimension given for this engine with instructions on setting the gap between the magnets and pick up using two feeler gauges. There's a couple of large phillips head screw heads accessible from the outside of the flywheel which presumably adjust the magnet position. I'm not going to mess with that unless as a last resort...:)

Pic shows the points, sorry I'm not a better photographer, and also the oiler in the upper left corner.

Ev
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I did remove the rust with 100 grit sandpaper. Hate to sound like an old man, but remember when "burnishing tools" were available locally? They, typically had a red plastic handle and a gray fleible blade and and were used to "burnish" the contacts in various things. A small engine mechanic I used to know always used a piece of thin crdboard, it was thick enough to be able to rub the point faces when closed. I use that every spring when I start my '62 Gravely walk behind. Works well.

Ev
 

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When you gap the points, use the buisness card as a feeler gauge, this technique worked well for me when i picked up a free sears snowblower that had sat forever. You should get a bright blue spark from the spark plug, if its orange or yellow, replace the condenser.
Good Luck!
 

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I used to have several burnishing tools that I used when working on relays in electrical substations, they are easily lost though. We used to get them from electronic component companies. I've never seen them for sale locally. I usually have have very fine grit sandpapers around that do the same, like 1000 or 1500.

Unless you have loosened the coil or stator assembly screws you really shouldn't have to reset the clearances or time it. Just gap the points and go with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update: Replaced condensor today. Afterthe old one was removed, checked it with a Simpson 260 meter, anyone remember those? It exhibited "large capacitor action" so, rusty, POS that it looks like, it seemed to be OK.

Still haven't found anything that would have caused the "no spark" which led me to pull the flywheel and start this journey. Points fine and gapped properly, don't know about 20 years of oxidation though. Condenser OK. Thinking now it may be the lead going to the plug that's defective. Parts diagram shows it as a separate entity from the coil. I admit I didn't look too close, assumed (yeah, yeah) that it was molded with the coil. Will continue tomorrow, depending on temperature in the barn. This is my winter project and I have time,

Thanks for responses,

Ev
 

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Did you check the coil with an ohmmeter? The secondary winding (high voltage lead) should read a few thousand ohms to ground. The primary winding (lead that goes to the points) should read less than an ohm to ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh, sorry forgot to mention that. Primary side is a dead short or an ohm or so. Secondary is 2300 ohms. That seems OK to me.

The "high side" continuity check was from the clip in the plug boot to ground. Even though this lead looks very worn, it would seem to have continuity.

Pulled the condenser and tried to trace where the plug wire entered the coil. Can't see anything, it's underneath. Anyone know what's involved in replacing this wire? Can it simply be pulled out and then the new one inserted? I DO NOT want to touch the mounting as that would mean retiming this. Last Tec i had to time was a 12HP on a generator about 20 years ago. I got it running, still does in fact, but my arm still hurts from the kick backs durinig the process....:)

I'll wander back out today or tomorrow and look again, before I button this back up. Still bothers me that I didni't find anything. Maybe, as we used to say when I did national travel troubleshooting "exotic" electronic control systems, "Changing the air inside can have wonderful curative properties." :)

Thanks again,

Ev
 
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