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Discussion Starter #1
As I was changing an attachment I was thinking about all the gravely attachments I've seen in barns, out behind the garage, in the open air, etc -not stored in the best conditions and rusty and all dirty.
I just used brake cleaner to remove any buildup on the attachment clutch (and it's been stored in a pretty nice shed) and then a spray of wd40. The way the clutches are built the springs etc can hold a lot of crud. I figure any dirt etc will end up in the oil in the tractor which I'd like to avoid.
I'm wondering if others have the same concerns and what you do?
 

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I must admit that I haven't ever given it much consideration. Either I was too young and foolish to think of it, or the attachment clutches didn't look too bad.
 

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My concerns are usually more related to rusty attachment clutch parts and whether or not it would even work.

You could always disassemble and give them a bath in mineral spirits, inspect/replace the friction discs and put it all back together. I have a couple that some PO put grease all over and that's my plan to remedy.

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Greased clutches means it was probably used on a retrofit kit. Your doing it right not to try finding out what might happen running it that way on a L tractor.
 

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Greased clutches means it was probably used on a retrofit kit. Your doing it right not to try finding out what might happen running it that way on a L tractor.
You're probably right. I hadn't considered that.

Sadly, the gearbox had grease in it too (rotary plow). Someone was too lazy to just replace the bottom oil seal when it started to leak apparantly.

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Discussion Starter #6
I've got to say that the brake cleaner and wd40 sure makes them look clean and almost new looking. I spray and give it a half turn and spray again. I think it's cleaner anyway!
 

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Usually the bearing behind the clutch will go first, due to rust, dirt ect. But if you remove the clutch remember that the half size nut controls the preload on the horizontal shaft. To adjust the preload on the horizontal housing, it should be removed from the vertical housing. You might find shims between the housings along with gaskets. Reuse them with the gasket if not damaged. They control the gear mesh. So now is the time to check the mesh. Start with one new gasket and the removed shims. Slowly tighten the bolts while turning the H shaft. After they are tight the shaft should turn without binding. Add or remove shims or gaskets so it turns smooth, without bind. After adjusted reassemble using permatex #3 form a gasket.

Todd
 

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Just my opinion and Im sure some will disagree but WD-40 as in "Water Displacement" cleans and breaks some stuff loose but I always wipe it off when done and use some other type stuff for lube and/or storage as there are many products out there.
This has nothing to do w/what I know or dont know about tractors but WD-40 will cause water to come together in beads if left on and then you can imagine what beads of water do to metal/steel parts so its a real good idea to wipe it off when done.
Again I say this from experience because when I was a kid I cleaned a nice S&W revolver with it and left a coat of it on for "safe keeping so it wouldnt rust" and it had to be re-blued because of the beads of rust bubbles all over it.
What it actually was we never figured out because no water was present during cleaning, but then again if you leave a gun uncleaned after use the bore will rust so water must be present in a lot of stuff esp. liquids.
So there's my 2 cents worth and I saw it all w/my own two eyes. Good luck,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes I agree that wd40 isn't a good storage oil. What I have done is used it after using a cleaner like brake cleaner to clean the bulk of the gunk off. Then I use the wd40 as a final clean and lube right before I put the attachment on. Wipe off and excess.
I have another quick story. Years ago (20?) we had a rainy opening day of deer season. That night several of the guys wiped their wet guns down and lubed them with wd40. The next day it was wet still then quickly turned very cold and snowed. None of the guns that had been wiped or sprayed with wd40 would even shoot! They were seized up! I'd used Remoil and mine was fine! They couldn't shoot until they had warmed up and cleaned their rifles again! And used a true gun oil!
 

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Forget WD40.

One word: Ballistol

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