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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any experience with the clamp on forks for a backhoe bucket? It seems that it might be easy to bend or distort the bottom of the bucket. I have a Ford 455 backhoe I used around the farm.
 

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I've never seen forks on a backhoe bucket. Do you mean on the loader bucket? A 455 should have both a backhoe and a front end loader.

I have clamp on forks that I use on the loaders on both my Ford 4000 and Kubota BX25D. The forks move the weight farther forward than a load of dirt or stone in the bucket, and so it limits how much weight you can lift with them. I haven't had any problems with either bucket n terms of bending or deforming.

If you are concerned with it though, they make clamp-on forks that also have chains that go around the bucket so that the top and bottom of the bucket both bear some of the weight:

forks with chains and binders
 

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Discussion Starter #3
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I've never seen forks on a backhoe bucket. Do you mean on the loader bucket? A 455 should have both a backhoe and a front end loader.

I have clamp on forks that I use on the loaders on both my Ford 4000 and Kubota BX25D. The forks move the weight farther forward than a load of dirt or stone in the bucket, and so it limits how much weight you can lift with them. I haven't had any problems with either bucket n terms of bending or deforming.

If you are concerned with it though, they make clamp-on forks that also have chains that go around the bucket so that the top and bottom of the bucket both bear some of the weight:

forks with chains and binders
yes, I mean the front loader. I have a bad habit of calling everything a bucket. Thanks for your comments.
 

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I have a set. On my small SCUT I originally bought them for, appreciable loads made the machine unstable due to mass so far out in front. Neither bucket nor forks suffered any damage. However, when I put them on my newer 46 Horse machine, the somehow became bent. In my defense, they're rated at well over 2000 lb, if I recall correctly. The machine won't even pick that much up. In the forks' defense, I've beat on them a lot. Sure... The machine won't lift 2000 lb that far out, but it'll PRY with 2000 lb force. On one fork. I've probably abused them more than I should have. I keep putting off bringing them into work and straighteneing them in a press, which I have permission to do. It would be nice to have skid steer quick tach and proper forks, but for what I've done with these forks vs what I paid for them, they owe me nothing.

If you do get some, stabilization is good. I also had to weld little "keepers" atop the cutting edge to keep the forks from moving and falling off.
 

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I have a pair of clamp-ons that are used only a couple times a year. Usually for offloading something from the pickup. If possible, I do as steddy above and attach the forks outward on the bucket. I have moved a gun safe, couple of different wood stoves, and so on. Very heavy things. Gotta be very cautious of the center of gravity.

Been using them maybe six or seven years, so far zero damage to either forks or bucket. I used to borrow a set from a friend, his were steel and very, very heavy. I decided I needed to stop borrowing and get my own, and I went with a pair made from heavy aluminum. I believe I ordered them from Northern Tool. Much lighter, and there has been no issue with them not being up to the job even if aluminum.

If needed frequently and regularly, I'd get a real set and remove the bucket for the duration.
 
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