My Tractor Forum banner

101 - 112 of 112 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,013 Posts
Gerrard,
Your bolts are not 9/16ths. Fasteners are measured by diameter and threads per inch not by the wrench size. In your case 3/8"-16. Meaning the diameter is 3/8ths of an inch and there are 18 threads per inch. In this case 18 threads is considered a course thread, the fine thread for this is 24 threads per inch.
Here is a link to a good chart for nuts and bolts sizes. Tap Chart UNC/UNF Threads - provides tap sizes, drill sizes, pitch, (threads per inch) basic major diameter, basic effective diameter, basic minor diameter of external threads, and basic minor diameter of internal threads for UNC/UNF threads
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Oh heck yea, I wouldnt be concerned about a torque # on the wheels/rims or adapters just not necessary I wouldnt think, just give em a decent tightening not over or under and they will be fine Im sure and maybe a little blue stud adhesive that I use on scopes wouldnt hurt.
And I bet the 'Beam type' T. Wrench was what I was trying to describe in a previous post, they have a needle looking thing that goes down to a scale at the bottom of the wrench.
Thanks.
Oh and BTW, I had my boss mark on that dang torque wrench I bought ( only one I could find that wasn't $50, and this was like $30 for pretty much one use) where the 20 lb. was on it just for my head on the thing. That was the only reasom I bought it.
I have a pic of it on here I think and if I can find it I'll post it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #103 ·
OK I understand that, you mean the dia of the round part of the bolt itself that the threads are cut into.
OMG Now my Buddy Fireant is gonna rip me one lol!
Thanks for the lesson because I needed it.
I used to sell a lot of sheet metal screws for duct work and the most popular one was a 8x1/2 and then the next size up was a 10x 1" and the head was bigger than the 8 x so I just thought that was what it meant. Oh well lol!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #104 ·
Gerrard,
While not my favorite type of torque wrench an inexpensive beam type torque wrench is just fine for our purposes. I do however prefer the click type or dial and in that order.
Judging by the amount of rust you found on the rims I'd say those adapters have been on for quite some time and the machine spent a fair amount of time outside and yes those bolts are not worth saving.[/QUOTE]

Funny thing is as far as rust goes the rims are the only thing that shows any real bad rust. Its like it could have been kept outside and covered-up but the tires and wheels sat on real wet mushy ground to the point that it may have settled down in the wet ground a cpl inches.
Kinda explains the non-stock hood that has been put on it to cover up gas tank and such. But the rest of the tractor isnt real rusty, its not premo by any means but not what I would call a rust bucket. But those rims are very very bad. I had to take a chizzel and knock off a clump of rust to get a wrench and socket on the bolt head.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 ·
That's the only problem I have with tractor supply bolts. You can't beat the prices, but their corrosion protection leaves something to be desired. They do rust rather quickly in the weather when left outside.
Actually I would prolly get them from GT's just because I know they will be right and I would like to give them the binnus because they go thru all the trouble of having parts for guys like us to get when we are in a jam, so I'll try to get stuff from them when Im not in a jam.
Its all a circle ya know? And they seem like good guys.
As soon as my refund gets here Im gonna shoot them a list of stuff I want/need and they dual bolts will be included if they have them that is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,013 Posts
Yes exactly. Just measure where the threads are cut and that will be the bolt size. Nuts are a bit trickier because the threads are on the inside but since neither are cut below 1/16 of an inch just go with the closest 1/16th. That's my own little personal cheat. Lols! That does not hold true for metric fasteners though. Lol's. Is your head ready to pop yet? Just teasing. Every single one of us was where you're at at one time or another in our lives. Just don't take anything I say as a put down because I don't do that.
Sheet metal and wood screws are a completely different animal than machine screws or bolts.
I'm not sure if there is a size difference between say a #10 machine screw and a #10 sheet metal or wood screw. Truthfully I never really cared to check it out. If I ever had a project that needed sheet metal or wood screws I just eyeballed the diameter and went with it.

The rust on your rims isn't too surprising because it's mostly where the adapters contacted the rims. It would hold moisture there. Perhaps you're right about the main part of the machine being covered and not the wheels because I've had to strip and paint every rim on my machines.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #107 ·
Yes exactly. Just measure where the threads are cut and that will be the bolt size. Nuts are a bit trickier because the threads are on the inside but since neither are cut below 1/16 of an inch just go with the closest 1/16th. That's my own little personal cheat. Lols! That does not hold true for metric fasteners though. Lol's. Is your head ready to pop yet? Just teasing. Every single one of us was where you're at at one time or another in our lives. Just don't take anything I say as a put down because I don't do that.
Sheet metal and wood screws are a completely different animal than machine screws or bolts.
I'm not sure if there is a size difference between say a #10 machine screw and a #10 sheet metal or wood screw. Truthfully I never really cared to check it out. If I ever had a project that needed sheet metal or wood screws I just eyeballed the diameter and went with it.

The rust on your rims isn't too surprising because it's mostly where the adapters contacted the rims. It would hold moisture there. Perhaps you're right about the main part of the machine being covered and not the wheels because I've had to strip and paint every rim on my machines.
Oh dont be concerned about anything like that I dont get all offended about stuff and I could see how ones head could explode w/all of it but everythings like that isnt it?
I pretty much get out of it bcause I will bring a bolt w/me Im wanting to replace and soon enough a employee at the hdwre store or TSC or wherever will see me fobbling around the bolts and come over and say 'Oh you need this one, its got the same thread count and its this hardness and bla bla bla lol!
I just give them the old 'Help Me I dont know what Im doing" look lol.
I do have a cpl thread guages Ive gotten from here and there, you can match your threads up to the ones cut in it and it even has the hole sizes for dia. One Ive had for years looks something like a feeler guage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,013 Posts
Hey that just means you've learned to adapt. Nothing wrong with that! I have a couple of the old feeler looking thread pitch gages from my early years of figuring this out. Now my metric thread pitch gages get a lot of use. Lols! I hate the metric system. It confused me as a kid in school when they decided we needed to convert to this system and pretty much still does. I fumble through it though much like you do at the hardware store. :tango_face_grin:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Hey that just means you've learned to adapt. Nothing wrong with that! I have a couple of the old feeler looking thread pitch gages from my early years of figuring this out. Now my metric thread pitch gages get a lot of use. Lols! I hate the metric system. It confused me as a kid in school when they decided we needed to convert to this system and pretty much still does. I fumble through it though much like you do at the hardware store. :tango_face_grin:
They always claimed we were gonna go to the metric system one day and other than some fasteners and darn engine sizes ( Im an old cubic inch displacement CID guy myself) and some European calibers on firearms that have always been that way we haven't gotten into it to much it seems.
The building trade stuff is still in standard measurement, dont see any carpenters wanting 2x4's and asking for 40x80's or whatever's yet lol!
Everytime someone tells me about a motor in their car I say "well what is it cubic inch wise?" So I can figure out what they are talking about, other than the burnt-out 5.0/ 302 thing lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,013 Posts
Actually have you really looked at the lumber stock at Home depot lately? They have very cleverly disguised metric lumber size to standard. It's hard to prove with 2X stock because it's cut to size while it's still fairly wet and then kiln dried which leads to a certain amount of shrinkage but sheet goods are showing sizes listed in the 64th of an inch range. Now this is just my opinion but tell me that's not actually metric sized lumber. Use to be it was 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 5/8, 3/4 and 1 inch sizes.
I worked as a nuclear mechanic for 24 years and the rad techs used the metric system to denote the amount of radiation. I never really could equate a reading with an actual amount size wise but I knew enough to think either, that's not bad or I'm out of here! Lols!
Oh boy are we off track! Lols!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Yea not just off track a bit but a SR-71 envelope ( whats that 80,000 ft.? Who knows really) but I kinda forgot most of my Nuclear Mechanic stuff thru the yrs.( LOL!) so we'll have to meet up again on the real complicated stuff like tuning up my Magneto or something OK?
I do know one thing and that is a 2x4 is only like 1 3/4 x 3 3/4 and that is a rip for sure. I have seen old lumber that I guess was cut at one of those country saw mills that used to be about every 15 miles or so round here and they were actually 2" x 4".
Later Man and thanks for the help, or should I say 'education' that I always need lol.
It never hurts to learn something...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #112 ·
This is the motivation I needed. My last Gravely purchase came with a set of dual wheels and I have yet to install them... which is odd as I can really benefit from this addition. Heck, I have probably logged 60 hours on my 'go-to machine for brush cutting' since I have procured the dual wheel set and these just sitting lonely in my shed. My puppy and I have a project to do and that is to install those dual wheels now!



Gerrard,
That hood was stripped down, primed, and painted and reinstalled on my machine. After cranking it up after the 'beautifying' process, I took a few pictures, and promptly removed the hood as it vibrated too much. Looking back, apparently the excessive vibration was the result of the flywheels being out of alignment. I realigned the flywheels a while back and completely forgot above the hood... until now (and that was only after you mentioned it). I may have to return the hood to its proper home - then, brambles, briars, and low-hanging branches will have a more difficult time in pulling my spark plug wire off!!!
Dont you have the pair of rubber bumpers or vibration dampeners for it? I kept my old ones and ordered new ones plus got some stuff to make them as well. I always felt isolating vibrations was pretty important.
If you would happen to need some good soft rubber for making some I'd send you some free of charge.
 
101 - 112 of 112 Posts
Top