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Any of you guys ever had an accident using a chainsaw? I've used saws for better than 25 years and never have...until recently. I have had some close calls but never got hit until two weeks ago this past Saturday. I was very fortunate. Apparently I had released the trigger before getting hit by the moving chain. That is all I can figure because the cut wasn't nearly as bad as it could have been. The saw hit the outside of my left leg just below the knee. Cut was about 2-1/2" long but was deep. I got dissolving sutures inside to sew up the muscle tissue then about 7 stitches to close the cut. I have wanted to get some saw chaps for a long time but just never pulled the trigger. I won't cut again until they arrive. Problem I have now is I can't decide on which one's to buy. Reading the reviews it looks like Husqvarna are possibly the best with Labonville in 2nd place. I do know that I want full wrap chaps but just don't know... Suggestions?


Oh, and if anyone wants me to post a couple of pics of the wound then I can... :tango_face_wink:
 

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I prefer the Labonville, been using them for years. The lower leg wrap design is better, easier to get on/off, with the buckles on the outside of the legs.
I've seen Stihl chaps cut all the way through. Then there is this video of a pair of Husqvarna chaps....

 

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I have Stihl chaps. Don’t know how much difference there is between brands.

I have not had a close call yet, but I am safety conscious. It’s easy to get complacent on this topic if your experienced and confident.

I did read about chainsaw accidents on line once, scared me into being more safety aware. Happens frequently mostly bad.

I always wear my chaps, safety glasses, steel toe boots, gloves while using the saw, no exception even for a quick trim of something. (I do start the saws without chaps when doing maintenance to oil up the chain, or run the gas out, probably should put the chaps on for that too.).

Don’t walk around with the saw running, put the chain brake on. I will take a couple steps with it running to move down a log but not stepping over branches or up, down hills in the woods.

Also, I don’t do chainsaw work after doing some other physically tiring activity, you need to be rested not tired out. I let it sit for another day.

I do drop start, which your not supposed to do. What to people think about that, is that too unsafe?

My worst sort of accident was in the woods with my orange HD bucket of supplies, I was running the saw next to the bucket to test chain oiler because it was cold, got too close, put a hole it the side of the bucket. Didn’t matter but, took that as a reminder how easy it is to screw up.
 

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I prefer the Labonville, been using them for years. The lower leg wrap design is better, easier to get on/off, with the buckles on the outside of the legs.

I've seen Stihl chaps cut all the way through. Then there is this video of a pair of Husqvarna chaps....



https://youtu.be/b08_dSH53Mw


off topic, but that Stihl in the background looks like a 241? I have one of those too, love the saw.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I prefer the Labonville, been using them for years. The lower leg wrap design is better, easier to get on/off, with the buckles on the outside of the legs.
I've seen Stihl chaps cut all the way through. Then there is this video of a pair of Husqvarna chaps....
I have those same Husqvarna chaps...seems like the guy in the video caught the chaps outside their protective area and was lucky he was carrying the leatherman albeit didn't look as though the leatherman was actually struck by the chain.

With that said, they are just chaps and given they slide about somewhat, they have a pretty limited range of protection which is really the fronts of your legs. I hope to never actually test them.
 

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Yup. Got my leg about 6 years ago. Was cutting a stump to ground level. Tip caught a big block on the other side and came back around real quick. No chain brake, but my hand slipped off the trigger, and the 36” chain was able to pretty much stop before contacting my lower shin on right leg. 22 stitches. Very clean cut, almost no blood. No bone or ligament damage. It Looked much worse than it was, because the taught skin on my lower leg separated quite a bit. Lost the feeling in the top of my foot, it’s about 85% back now.

These days I use Stihl chaps.
 

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Been fortunate, hit a pair of brand new leather boots and put a hole in the top, and once brushed my leg which had a very slight cut. Got a Husky kit with their helmet and chaps. Haven't used the chaps though as I've done very little cutting since I got them.
 

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I have heated with wood for 43 years. This will be the first winter without a fire.

My wife caught me trying to start my saw last year and said "You're Done"
 

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I have Stihl chaps. Don’t know how much difference there is between brands.
You might be surprised at the difference. Go on YouTube and watch some off the videos. Some brands are pretty bad....

I have those same Husqvarna chaps...seems like the guy in the video caught the chaps outside their protective area and was lucky he was carrying the leatherman albeit didn't look as though the leatherman was actually struck by the chain.

With that said, they are just chaps and given they slide about somewhat, they have a pretty limited range of protection which is really the fronts of your legs. I hope to never actually test them.
No, he did hit the fiber pad, but its was only a small cut in any case. The saw went right through the protective layers and hit the tool. You can see the gouges when he holds it up. The kevlar should have stopped that from happening, but not enough was pulled out.

Been fortunate, hit a pair of brand new leather boots and put a hole in the top, and once brushed my leg which had a very slight cut.
Boots are fairly important as thats where a lot of chainsaw cuts happen. Regular leather boots won't help at all, safety toe boots only help if the caps are steel (the saw will go right through the composite toe caps) but the top of the foot still has no protection. I've worn a pair of Labonville kevlar safety boots for years when cutting just for this reason, and for winter I have a pair of Viking Tusk boots.
 

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OK, where to start::tango_face_plain::tango_face_plain:


The guy in the video is an imbecile. I quote, "I was holding the trigger with my left hand and top bar in my right hand":tango_face_surprise:tango_face_surprise



The saw must be held with a very firm grip with the thumb wrapped around the top bar, not like a monkey paw. The saw should be held in such a manner that if there is a kick back, it will go to the right of your body, not in the center of your melon.

I've only had one close call and it was with what I knew was a significant hazard. I cut a fair sized tree and it was in very heavy brush. The tree bent over a 1" diameter hickory tree that was in my way and had to go because it was in the way. I recognized this as a "spring pole" and knew it there was significant energy involved. I tightly held onto the saw and cut the tree off. In the process it tore the saw out of my hands and the decelerating chain tore the top layer of the bibs I had on. I was not injured.

Here is a chart involving injuries. The right hand injuries deserve explanation. Those are from people using small top handle saws, holding limbs in their right hand and the chainsaw in the left.


https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/logging/manual/logger/chain_saw/saw_injuries.html
 

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No, he did hit the fiber pad, but its was only a small cut in any case. The saw went right through the protective layers and hit the tool. You can see the gouges when he holds it up. The kevlar should have stopped that from happening, but not enough was pulled out.
No? I'm not completely convinced. I'll restate my comment for clarity, I think the cut was outside of the effective protective area of the chaps.

The user states he was holding the trigger with his left hand which would imply that the bar/chain came down across his right leg in such a way that contact would grab/pull the chaps and flip the edge over is what the video shows. If you look at the video again, there is very minor damage on the front and heavy damage on the back as the edge of the chaps flipped over. No way any pair of chaps will provide adequate protection in that situation.

I'm not saying the chaps are great, I am unimpressed with their quality and they offer limited protection, but they never stood a chance in that situation.
 

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Hate to even reply cause I'm worried about jinxing myself. Been using Labonville chaps and their protective gloves. Fortunately haven't had to test them yet. And I don't want to! And they, along with the boots, helmet and face shield give me a sense of safety, but not invincibility so I don't get careless and take chances.
MikeC
 

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My older brother was a 'tree trimmer', I guess they now call them "arborists" for a utility in his early years. One of the things he always said was you never cut a tree without removing all of the brush and saplings around the base. Even a small sapling can spring back and break limbs or kill with amazing power.

If you have one pinned down by a fallen tree, stop the saw, examine the situation carefully, and better to proceed slowly with a hand saw. I often work alone, so have to ask myself, if I get whacked, who will find me and when?

If you think your tree job will take an hour, be sure you have at least 2 hours to do it. Don't rush, it will come back to bite you....literally....
 

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The guy in the video is an imbecile. I quote, "I was holding the trigger with my left hand and top bar in my right hand":tango_face_surprise:tango_face_surprise.......

The right hand injuries deserve explanation. Those are from people using small top handle saws, holding limbs in their right hand and the chainsaw in the left.
So he is an imbecile because he is left handed?:dunno:

The hand injuries are from using a top handle saw in one hand. A lot of inexperienced users hold the saw in the right hand and reach over the top of the bar with the left to hold a limb, and when the limb is cut through it pulls the hand down on top of the moving chain...
 

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So he is an imbecile because he is left handed?:dunno:

The hand injuries are from using a top handle saw in one hand. A lot of inexperienced users hold the saw in the right hand and reach over the top of the bar with the left to hold a limb, and when the limb is cut through it pulls the hand down on top of the moving chain...
Whether it is politically correct or not, a chainsaw is made for right handed people. If you are left handed you still must operate it like a right handed user, i.e., FIRMLY grasp the top bar with your left hand and the right hand if for the throttle.

A top handle saw still should have two hands on the saw. However it happens injuries with top handles occur because of using one hand.
 

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My older brother was a 'tree trimmer', I guess they now call them "arborists" for a utility in his early years. One of the things he always said was you never cut a tree without removing all of the brush and saplings around the base. Even a small sapling can spring back and break limbs or kill with amazing power.

A professional is trained and all users should abide by the same rules. Rule #1 when felling a tree is have TWO escape routes planned and cleared of anything that could trip you and always be looking up when the tree iis getting close to releasing, not at the tree or saw. If you are cutting a tree down, you should be proficient enough with a saw that you don't have to be looking at it. Everything that will kill you is above you when it comes to felling trees.
 

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I was looking at a cheap cost effective brand new McMullen chain saw at a garage sale when I was in my early 20's. Like an idiot I decided to rotate the chain by hand and get the chain spinning at a pretty good rate. I thought I was being careful until I wasn't then the chain caught my index finger from the nail to the bottom of my finger print and sliced it pretty dang good. Don't do that kids. :duh: I have a whole new respect for chain saws after that.
 

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Back in the late 60s/early 70s when I was an Apprentice Mechanic, one of our customers was the local hardware store as they did some deliveries with their pickup and box van.

One afternoon, the pickup comes rolling in at high speed; the kid is driving and he's pale as a ghost. There's a guy in the passenger side and he's even more pale. "WHICH WAY TO THE HOSPITAL!!" the kid shouts at me.

I point: "One block up, two blocks over!"

The pickup leaves about six months' worth of rubber in the driveway as the kid roars out.

About an hour or so, the truck comes rolling back in. The kid is apologetic for the scratch marks in the lot (which I had to clean off), wants to use the wash rack on the side of the building. "Sure, anything we can help you with?"

"Maybe a bucket of hot soapy water and a scrub brush..." And the kid takes the truck around the side.

I go out with the bucket and brush, and the kid has both doors open on the truck. He's washing blood out of it...

I had to give the kid credit for his strong stomach, that was quite a job. Asked him what happened. "This guy was looking at a chainsaw, and wanted to start it up. Well, we keep gas in all the display models, so sure, we let him. Next thing I know, the guy has dropped the saw and is hollering. It wasn't pretty, what he did to his wrist. I don't know if he's going to get to keep his hand."

I never found out, but boy what a cautionary tale for someone like me who at the time thought they were pretty much bulletproof.
 

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I have heated with wood for 43 years. This will be the first winter without a fire.

My wife caught me trying to start my saw last year and said "You're Done"
Oh, that's a great pic. Funny as ****. Something like that would have appeared in The National Lampoon. Where'd you come up with that idea?
 
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