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Dachshund said:
.... I try to get and aggressive cutting chain, but in this area, they are hare to find......
They're hard to find in this area too (I have to special order them). Like I stated, buying an aggressive chain is like buying a gun.

Try buying a bow saw. You've got a better shot at buying a bomb.

 

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Dachshund said:
All the sprockets/chain/bars are matched
I have noticed that when I pull the chain around by hand it IS NOT smooth!
The chain SHOULD pull real smooth.

Find the reason for that problem, and I'll bet you won't have anymore chain "stretch."
 

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Most of you guys have probably used chain saws more than I, but I am one of those really weird people that reads a new or replacement products instructions and I may have picked up something that may help.

When I purchased a Homelite Super EZ 16" chain saw many years ago, these are some of the things suggested to me by the books and writings of that time (No easy internet or cheap computers back then.).

Buy 3 chains with the correct drive pawl pitch (That's the part that rides in the bar groove and nose sprocket and is driven by the engine.).

Alternate chains and when the chains wear out, replace the drive gear, the nose sprocket, and buy 3 new chains.

Now I understand the problem here is a brand new saw and I can not understand how the problem is occurring.

No disrespect intended, but the problem defies all the laws of physics.

When I purchased my Super EZ, there was not a big market for "safety chain" and everybody selling chains was bragging about speed of cut. My younger brother and I were doing a little tree trimming on the side and this little Homelite was a butt buster and cut like a screaming meemee. I purchased high speed chain that was not as wide as regular chain and with an aggressive cut. I sharpened my own chain and adjusted the bumper .025" every time I sharpened. When the curls of wood became too short (I didn't wait for them to become sawdust.), I changed blades (Remember, I always started with 3 sharp blades.) and kept on cutting.

The narrower blades wore out faster and had to be replaced more often, but they offered less resistance when in the wood and baby, time is money and even back then the ROI was worth the slightly extra expense. We checked the bar for burrs with every blade change and filed the burrs off. We checked for lubrication anytime the speed of the cut or the sound of the engine sounded a little off.

Among friends I know, the biggest problem with people that sharpen chains is that they do not adjust the bumper height (That is the little rounded thing just in front of each cutter.). On safety chain, this is an even bigger problem because they have an entire link in front of the cutter link that is a bumper plus the bumper that is in front of the cutter.

I would recommend getting what is nowadays known as "professional grade" chain and check to make sure that "every link" has an alternating cutter on it with NO spacer links that have just a bumper on them. Buy a bumper adjusting measurement tool and read how to use it. The more powerful the saw, the lower you can adjust the bumper to take a deeper cut. If the person using the saw is not strong, you set the bumper higher for a shallower cut and more safety. Buy the narrowest chains you can for your saw and keep an eye on the bar so that you don't build up a burr that will slow down your cutting.

There is so much more to know, but I suggest you get a good reference manual and read it. Back in the old days, my instruction manual that came with my Super EZ did an awful lot to educate me. I don't know what the current manuals tell people.

Good luck!

Bountyhunter
 

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Bountyhunter said:
... I am one of those really weird people that reads a new or replacement products instructions and I may have picked up something that may help...
Reading instructions is pretty unusual. Some may even call it cheating.
 

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Dutch,yeah, but that kind of cheating saves money and un-due stress :00000061: .

Bountyhunter, we sharpen all of our chains in house and you are right about the raiker height but a word of caution to those whom are of less experience to not do any messing with the stock depth as it also creates a monster kick back and excessive wear on the power head :tsk:
 

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Draddogs:

I gotta disagree with you on the raker (bumper) height issue with you.

The chain manufacturers set the rakers height based on lowest output power chain saws because they do not know what the chain is going on or what the level of expertise the user will have.

My little Super EZ is a small engined saw but handles the .025 raker depth without a problem and I am able to push down hard without straining the engine. It has never "grabbed" the saw from my hands which would indicate a lack of strength on my part.

I tried .035" and .030" but it affected the speed of the engine too much, so I settled on .025". Even at the deeper settings, it never "grabbed" because I was strong enough to control it, but the engine response told me to go with a shallower cut. The raker depth setting gauge I have will go as low as .040" which I have never tried. With a more powerful saw, I could have and would have gone for a deeper cut, but every one has to know what works for them and proceed accordingly.

My saw also does not have the "antikickback" designed blade or the blade tip cover. I have done many a plunge cut on stumps before fireing them, but like everything else, you have to know what you are doing and your personal abilities.

Bountyhunter
 

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Dutch-NJ said:
Reading instructions is pretty unusual. Some may even call it cheating.
draddogs said:
Dutch,yeah, but that kind of cheating saves money and un-due stress :00000061: .
My comment was meant facetiously.

I was once accused of cheating because I knew the answer to a TV quiz show question. The accuser claimed I must have read the about the topic somewhere..............
 

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Dasch, take the bar & chain off and start the saw, watch the sprocket nut on the shaft, see if it wobbles! sounds like positive factory defect. (bent sprocket shaft. don't take much!) thanks;sonny
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
sonny said:
Dasch, take the bar & chain off and start the saw, watch the sprocket nut on the shaft, see if it wobbles! sounds like positive factory defect. (bent sprocket shaft. don't take much!) thanks;sonny

I was wondering about that......... :banghead3
 

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Lots of excellent chain adjusting/choosing/sharpening/hopping up above BUT... Very simply, some saws are VERY touchy about HOW the chain is adjusted, but ALL saws must be adjusted as follows: (this little "trick" is hidden in EVERY saw manual, if you know where to look)

When adjusting the chain and ANY time after loosening the bar locking nuts, hold the back handle in your left hand and SUPPORT THE NOSE of the bar on something. Only loosen the nuts to where the bar just moves, not floppy loose. While supporting the saw with the weight on the bar tip it gives it the "pre-adjustment". Set your tension screw adjustment and then tighten the bar nuts KEEPING THE NOSE SUPPORTED until the nuts are tightened all the way!

If you adjust the chain with the bar hanging out in the air or let it flop around the minute you tighten the bar nuts you have room for the bar to move UP no matter where the adjustment screw is set. Nuts tightened by Superman or not when the chain/bar/saw heat up there will be significant changes in the adjustment. AND it won't be tighter!

You can prove this by moving the bar up and down with the lock nuts slightly loose. The tip will move enough to slack off any adjustment when the bar goes up and right back to tension when the bar drops back down.

If this doesn't fix the problem there's nothing anyone but Paul Bunyon can do because all infinitesimal permutations of pure saw physics have been exhausted at this point. Buy a new Sthil saw and read the book... Uncle Manual is very smart and wrote some good stuff. :D
 

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That chain could be made by pygmies out of lizard teeth and it still wouldn't stretch that far... All chain will "stretch" when new. It's not stretching but "settling" in each and every rivit and link... Some a bit more than others but NOT like in the original post.

And how many Stihl users ever read the part about LOOSENING the chain after use to save engine seal and bearings as everything cools down? It's in my 026P manual... so I do it... Silly me!:D
 

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That's why I won't buy anything except Homelite saws, Trouble free, NOT picky, just grab and go!! thanks; sonny
 
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