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deerhed
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Discussion Starter #1
I need to take a 1/2 link out of my chain on my Snowcaster. Any ideas on what size Chain is on that ? 420? 430?

and... any ideas on where to either get it broken or where to find an inexpensive breaker? I'd hate to have to buy one just for this one use!
I suppose a motorcycle shop could do it eh?
 

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creek
your caster chain should be 75 pitches of # 40 roller chain.
this means it has a 1/2 link from new.
this may be only an adjustment problem.
can you post some pics. and list a model #
thank you. boomer (the used onan engine parts guy)
 

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deerhed
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Discussion Starter #3
It's a 38" Ingy Caster... and even with adjustment at full-out it's still WICKED LOOSE!
I figured taking a 1/2 link out would do the trick.
As someone else suggested I loosened the bolts on BOTH sides of the shaft (to avoid flexing the shaft) and pulled it back as far as I could...still way too loose.
No pics...but you get the idea right?

The chain is on good shape and only has 65 hrs on it... so I dont want to replace it....just take a link out.
What's WEIRD is I wouldn't think this 65 hour Blower would need the chain replaced OR broken! WEIRD.
 

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How many hours do you use the blower per winter?
Taking length from the chain does nothing to help the fact that it no longer has the correct pitch for your application. It will now ride higher on the ramps and start chewing sprockets.
Chains are cheap.
 

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To answer your initial question, a chain breaker is the best thing to use and a place like Harbour Freight or Sears will have one cheap. You can also file smooth the head of the pin to be removed and then open the jaws of your vise enough to let the pin slip through as you tap it out with a drift pin punch slightly smaller than the pin or use a nut instead of the vise. An extra hand is helpful to hold the chain. All this is assuming there is a master link to remove the chain from the caster.

:trink40:
 

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deerhed
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Discussion Starter #7
Thnx....I'll try Harbor Freight.

Also, how could shortening a chain change the "pitch" and hurt sprockets?
 

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Thnx....I'll try Harbor Freight.

Also, how could shortening a chain change the "pitch" and hurt sprockets?
Adjusting a chain is ok within its limits. Once worn beyond its limit the pitch (center to center on the chain) is longer. This measurement has to be the same pitch as the sprockets which is measured at the end of the tooth to the next tooth. A 3/8 sprocket pitch has to be matched to a 3/8 pitch chain.
So when you have a worn chain with a pitch greater than 3/8 then the chain no longer rides in the proper position on the sprocket tooth. This will cause the teeth of the sprockets to wear into a "sharks tooth" as the spockets are slowly worn out.
Chain are usually measured pin to pin. Even 4% is worn out in most cases.
Shortening the chain does not change the fact that the pitch is no longer within its limits.
 

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Put on a new chain. I grind the pins on one side of a link and push them thru with a small diameter punch. You can buy both full and half master links, get some and keep some in stock.
I just remembered that I have a bicycle chain breaker that I use!!!! Worked fine on the #40 chain.
Bob MacGregor in CT:thThumbsU
 

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deerhed
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Discussion Starter #10
Adjusting a chain is ok within its limits. Once worn beyond its limit the pitch (center to center on the chain) is longer. This measurement has to be the same pitch as the sprockets which is measured at the end of the tooth to the next tooth. A 3/8 sprocket pitch has to be matched to a 3/8 pitch chain.
So when you have a worn chain with a pitch greater than 3/8 then the chain no longer rides in the proper position on the sprocket tooth. This will cause the teeth of the sprockets to wear into a "sharks tooth" as the spockets are slowly worn out.
Chain are usually measured pin to pin. Even 4% is worn out in most cases.
Shortening the chain does not change the fact that the pitch is no longer within its limits.
Thanks for the EDU!
Makes sense.
What does NOT make sense is how this chain needs to be replaced after 65 hrs of operation!
 

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Thanks for the EDU!
Makes sense.
What does NOT make sense is how this chain needs to be replaced after 65 hrs of operation!
How many winters does 65 hours of operation equal?
The chain on these is really exposed. I am going to spray mine with a good lube. I imagine the moisture within the rolers rusts and grinds away. Nature of the design.
 

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Actually 65 hours is a lot of snowblowing time. I'm on the 3rd chain on my SB48. I have no idea how much time was on the SB48 from PO, but it wasn't much. I had a problem several years ago when I picked up a brick in a customers driveway and it hung up the SB48, bent the auger, broke the chain, all of which contributed to the failure of the electric clutch shortly after. When a chain streaches it affects the sprocket tips and will bend and curl them over.
I only put 15-25 hours a year on my SB48 doing customers driveways. I no longer do snow removal having been sewed by a customer for putting some chain scratches in his driveway. This was in my contract but I forgot to have him sign for that season. Same contract as the year before but didn't have any bearing on the new season so said the judge. :banghead3
This past winter it pleased me to no end when I saw a loader in his driveway moving the piles of snow that were left by the snow plowing contractor that he hired. The loader operator had no mercy and tore up parts of a too thin blacktop driveway. The house has since been foreclosed on and the driveway looks like someone took a rototiller to parts of it!
Mad Mackie only removes snow in his own driveway, so his SB48 should outlast him!!!!:fing32:
 

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Thanks for the EDU!
Makes sense.
What does NOT make sense is how this chain needs to be replaced after 65 hrs of operation!

Snowblowers don't get a lot of use but the issue with them is they sit between winters and the chain doesn't get lubed before storage. Then it rusts and the next year they get put into operation (sometimes again without maintenance) and that will wear a chain exceptionally fast! Not saying that's what you did, but that's one reason they need replaced fairly often. Good maintenance will keep a chain good for a very long time!
 

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A lot depends on the amount of dirt that one encounters while snow blowing with this type of blower. The chain is right out there!!!
Bob MacGregor in CT:fam32::bump9:
 
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