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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking through the owners manual for my Stihl MS250 & found it had a feature for cold temperatures to prevent carburetor icing? I've never heard of such a thing having lived in North Carolina all my life. My MS280 also has the feature so it must be on most(if not all chainsaws). Does anyone use this feature?
 

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not quins. but sextuplets
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I have a 2 year old Sthil.... & mine does not have that feature...
 

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My Stihl 290 (now sold) and 361 have cold weather settings. My other Husqvarna and Dolmar/Makita saws have it, too.

For those who work long hours during spring and summer (farmers, gardeners, landscapers, lawn service), winter is firewood production season. Around here, that means cutting in snow and freezing weather, so we use the winter setting every year. The bonus is that it's easier to skid logs on frozen ground. Also, there aren't any mosquitoes, wasps, or snakes around.
 

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Carburetor icing was very common with carbureted vehicles during warmup when the weather was damp and temperatures were between 30-40 F. Ice forming around the throttle plates would cause rough running and or stalling, sometimes icing was so severe that vehicles would lose power at highway cruising speeds. In the late 60's vehicles began using heated air intakes and manifold heat risers to try to prevent icing. Some vehicles even had electricly heated carb base gaskets and many had and still have heated PCV valves to stop the PCV system from freezing which can cause engine oil to be pushed into the air breather. Automotive carburetor icing pretty much became a thing of the past with ported fuel injection because the fuel no longer takes heat from the throttle body. Some small engines also try to deal with icing such as snow blowers that have shielded air breathers that use exhaust heat to heat the intake air.
 

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Most of your newer Stihl saws are equipped with this cold weather baffle. My MS 250 has one. But unless you are cutting for long periods in below-freezing weather, you shouldn't need to ever set it to the cold weather operating position. In fact, taking the baffle out or accidentally moving it to the cold operating position will cause loss of performance in warm weather. Just FYI.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Most of your newer Stihl saws are equipped with this cold weather baffle. My MS 250 has one. But unless you are cutting for long periods in below-freezing weather, you shouldn't need to ever set it to the cold weather operating position. In fact, taking the baffle out or accidentally moving it to the cold operating position will cause loss of performance in warm weather. Just FYI.
Yea the book said leaving it in the "winter setting" during summer weather would cause performance issues & possible overheating.:eek:
 

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All of my saws except the Stihl have that feature and I have never used it. The heated handles ones have electric carb heat too and that has been defeated. I have never seen a saw have icicing in the carb issues and it gets cold here.

Forgetting to switch the window and running heated air in the summer can cause problems.
 
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