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Discussion Starter #81
Sounds great F-Moon. I know with the newer engineered stoves, stuffing them full of wood does not yield better heat/burn time. At least from what My Dad's experience has been with his Avalon Olympic. It likes to have an air gap around the fuel to ciculate. Wow does that this throw heat!

Keep warm.
I plan on getting a ton this weekend or next week :dunno:.

MU
 

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Discussion Starter #82
Picked up a ton of pellets today, finally. Went with North Idaho Fir premium softwood. Truck hauled it no problem. Old Chevy with the low 1st gear pulled away and chugged all the way home. Quite a few hills but roads are fairly smooth out through there. Just about 19 miles one way from Monson Ma.
Son and I got them loaded in closet. I have about 1.5 tons now. The previous North Country and these. I did pick up 3 bags of LaCrete softwood the other night as I stopped into the place that solds NC pellets, but had only a few to choose from. Thought I'd try them. Not as good as the North Country IMO. These NI are supposed to be one of the far superior offered. Reviews are great and Stove shop swears by them. About $20 more per ton. Will report results. Definitely the cleanest looking in bag, no sawdust, fines etc.

MU
 

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Picked up a ton of pellets today, finally. Went with North Idaho Fir premium softwood. Truck hauled it no problem. Old Chevy with the low 1st gear pulled away and chugged all the way home. Quite a few hills but roads are fairly smooth out through there. Just about 19 miles one way from Monson Ma.
Son and I got them loaded in closet. I have about 1.5 tons now. The previous North Country and these. I did pick up 3 bags of LaCrete softwood the other night as I stopped into the place that solds NC pellets, but had only a few to choose from. Thought I'd try them. Not as good as the North Country IMO. These NI are supposed to be one of the far superior offered. Reviews are great and Stove shop swears by them. About $20 more per ton. Will report results. Definitely the cleanest looking in bag, no sawdust, fines etc.
MU
We looked at pellets for heating but with the amount of down / dead wood we always have available on the farm, it seems wasteful.
The major benefits (pellet stove vrs wood burner stove) I see is the ability to load most stove hoppers for a longer burn time, control the heat output better, cleaner storage and handling, and less ash to remove and dispose. The pellet stove require electricity to operate, that is a major negative for us.
We have looked at getting a pelletizer and manufacturing our own pellets but I am not sure if the cost of that equipment could be justified.
Some folks in our area burn corn or soybeans. Corn is going for around $3.00 / bushel (56 pounds) which calculates out to $107.00 per ton, which is less than pellets in our area. I believe the btu output for corn vrs wood pellets is similar - see websites posted below for more details.
Just rambling.

http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/techline/fuel-value-calculator.pdf

http://www.ehow.com/about_6647729_burning-corn-vs_-wood-pellets.html

http://www.oregonwoodheat.com/CornPricesBW.pdf
 

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Be careful haulin those pellets...I'm sure you know, but I'm gonna say it anyway, you are way over the rated payload limit. God forbid you get into an accident...your insurance company won't cover you...
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
Understood. Over no argument but way over? I think I can have about 1850lbs payload. This includes me, passenger etc. So Yeah about 400 lbs over give or take.
It was not as heavy as the yard of gravel I hauled mid summer. I was very cautious and took it easy.
Axle was an inch or so from rubber stops.

To think of all those loads of wood my Dad hauled from South Windsor to Andover Ct. My word those were way overloaded runs every single time. :hide: The old 1977 Chevrolet C10 never whimpered. I cannot even guess how many cord of wood that truck hauled. Bumper near to the ground every time. Huge rounds of RED OAK, Hickory, ASH etc.
We used to look under the truck and say Dad the spings are going the other way! He'd always say ok few more pieces. :dunno:

Thanks

MU
 

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Understood.
It was not as heavy as the yard of gravel I hauled mid summer. I was very cautious and took it easy.
Axle was an inch or so from rubber stops.

To think of all those loads of wood my Dad hauled from South Windsor to Andover Ct. My word those were way overloaded runs every single time. :hide: The old 1977 Chevrolet C10 never whimpered. I cannot even guess how many cord of wood that truck hauled. Bumper near to the ground every time. Huge rounds of RED OAK, Hickory, ASH etc.
We used to look under the truck and say Dad the spings are going the other way! He'd always say ok few more pieces. :dunno:

Thanks

MU
If you look at the pic you posted, you can see where not only did you have the bed loaded up on the heavy side, but having a good portion of that weight BEHIND the rear axle reduced the weight on the front axle (the exact opposite of what you would have wanted to have happen - you WANT the front axle to carry some of the load). This results in the rear axle carrying all of the load, reducing the effectiveness of steering, and significantly reducing the braking capabilities of the truck.

You made it, no damage, no one hurt. All good there. Just wanted to point out WHY the overloading was actually dangerous even though there was still a little room left from the suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Absolutely. No excuses whatsoever!
Next time I will take the cover off completly and have them push pallet up to cab.
It definitely was too far back. Truck handled fine surprisingly, front end was not light feeling or anything.

MU
 

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Live and learn. I learned something too from the good safety comments. I don't own a pick-up, but if I ever do I'll try to remember this good advice here.

You must have got a good workout moving that pallet load into storage. Great to have the pellets all loaded in for the winter. Could be another long one!
 

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You are correct, "way over" was a bit of an over....never mind, you get it.

The rated payload should be on the sticker when you open the door. You're still over, and therefor open to full liability if in an accident...

It's a big grey area when it comes to capacities and what not. There is margin built in to the numbers, since they know people will load them up right to the max. If your 1 lb over, you're not going to damage your truck and you're really not any less "safe" than you were at 1 lb under the limit. It's impossible to say at what point you are definitely going to do damage, or going to be unsafe.

All I do know is that if you are over any capacity, and get in an accident, you are screwed..!

Doing something because someone else (even your own Dad) did it, is a horrible reason to do just about anything!



Understood. Over no argument but way over? I think I can have about 1850lbs payload. This includes me, passenger etc. So Yeah about 400 lbs over give or take.
It was not as heavy as the yard of gravel I hauled mid summer. I was very cautious and took it easy.
Axle was an inch or so from rubber stops.

To think of all those loads of wood my Dad hauled from South Windsor to Andover Ct. My word those were way overloaded runs every single time. :hide: The old 1977 Chevrolet C10 never whimpered. I cannot even guess how many cord of wood that truck hauled. Bumper near to the ground every time. Huge rounds of RED OAK, Hickory, ASH etc.
We used to look under the truck and say Dad the spings are going the other way! He'd always say ok few more pieces. :dunno:

Thanks

MU
 

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Discussion Starter #90
:sidelaugh
You are right on, Just because Dad did it does not make it ok.
He reflects now and admits it was stupid and dangerous. Having 1 of us ride on the load at that all the way home at that.
Different times 35+ or so years ago.
But I tell you I would not have changed much about those experiences.
I truely believe he pushed it but always had our safety considered, ok I'm telling myself that.:praying:
Still cannot believe that old 1/2 ton never broke, bent anything at all.

Thanks again for the info.

Guess I need a 3/4 ton truck or borrow friends trailer. I do have it all wired for brakes etc.

Or just unload from pallet and spead over entire insides of bed. Of course that's a lot of handling. :fing20:
 

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If you have them push the pallet to the front, chock your wheels. Saves putting all that stress on your parking pawl.
 

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The weight was probably not as big a factor as the placement of it,as noted..

Properly distributed,a 1/2 ton can carry quite a bit over its rated capacity with no horror stories,as long as your careful..
If you had made a panic stop with that load that far back,it could have been curtains for you...trucks can fishtail easily with lots of weight behind the rear wheels too..

Since you have to unwrap the bags at home to carry them to the storage area anyway,you may as well do it at the pellet store and put the bags up front as much as possible..and keep them lower than a pallet stack,so it'll be less "tippy"..

I have seen a few 55 gallon drums of 15W-40 be stood up near the tail gate in a pickup like yours,the guy was "just delivering them about a mile up the street"

I sold them to the guy who worked for a contractor at my job at a parts store,and advised him he should really lay them down,and roll them to the front of the bed,then put the spare tire behind them, to keep them from rolling..."Naaa--it'll be all right".."I'll just go slow"..

He made it about half way there,when a woman backed out of a driveway and failed to look both ways...he hit the brakes hard,stopped in time to avoid hitting her,but the two drums slid forward,caved in the back of the truck's bed and the cab,shattered the rear window,and both drums ruptured and belched about 50 gallons all over the truck,driver,and the road,all in a matter of seconds...:eek:..the owner of the company got fined 10K for the spill...fired the guy driving too..

I think 1/2 ton trucks were built much more rugged back when your dad was hauling wood...
I had over 2 tons in a 77 GMC that had a 1/2 ton frame and 3/4 ton axles,with only 6 leaf rear springs..truck drove OK,a bit scary over 30 mph though--I hauled a old bulldozer diesel engine to a scrapyard 3 miles from where it was being dismantled..guys at the scales said I was insane...engine weighed in at 4,120 lbs!...my truck weighed 6,250!..

On my way back to the place where the dozer was being cut up,my steering shaft rag joint failed,and my steering wheel just spun freely with no connection to the box!--good thing I was going about 10 mph and doing a u-turn in a parking lot when it came off,or I'd have been dead,or someone else might have been too.....never hurt the springs or frame though!..actually I was afraid of the tires,more than anything else...but they were the least of my problem..

A friend of mine had a '67 C-10 that he used to haul wood ,with a 8 foot flatbed..he put about 10 leafs in each rear spring...thing rode like it had dead axles in the rear!..but it never sagged..
One day he had about 3 cords of wood on it and he pulled into my driveway and I heard a loud "snap" as he turned in my driveway...

He said "I think one of my tires is low on air,it feels weird--can I use your compressor ? "..
We looked at all 4 tires,they all had over 35 lbs in them...

I had him turn the wheels back and forth,and saw the drivers side tire moving in and out !--the lower A-frame had 2 big U-bolts that attached it to the frame..."had" as in one was missing one side of the "U" !...it was not a fun job trying to install the new one,that we had to go 25 miles to get at a dealership..I couldn't believe the A-frame hadn't come right off,and only one U-bolt held it together..

I got stopped once when I had a large load of pallets on my truck--state cop pulled me over,when he walked up to the door,he stopped and pulled on a ratchet strap I had holding them on--he said "Ah,good,you DO have them tied down!--but you really shouldn't trust just one strap--what if it broke?"...

I had a few more straps behind the seat,so I got out and added another one to the load,so he'd be happy..he said "I dont like seeing trucks with big piles of pallets,lumber,or things like motorcycles in the bed ,and not tied down well--I've had to pull people out of wrecks after a load fell off into the road before"..
 

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I'm not worried about the truck being overworked, I am worry about a lawyer taking everything he has worked for because he was driving an overloaded truck...

In managing risk, you have two parameters to consider: likelihood of occurrence, and level of consequence. For any given event, if both are high, you're unlikely to do it, if both are low, you are likely to go ahead. In this case, the likelihood of trouble is low, but the consequence is potentially high, just pointing out how high it could be...

Getting back to the last relevant post....looks like those pellets have arrived just in time for a cold snap!



Properly distributed,a 1/2 ton can carry quite a bit over its rated capacity with no horror stories,as long as your careful..
 

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Discussion Starter #94 (Edited)
This is a good example why this forum is great. All excellent info. Makes One cognizant and more cautious of what's going on. At least that's how I feel about it.
I really do appreciate how we all look out for one another and not take it as a slam pointing out faults etc. I welcome all whom point out flaws and dangerous activity etc.

Yes, I just heard the forecast and am happy they are in the closet. :thThumbsU

I may go get a few more bags from AGWAY as they just started selling a softwood pellet as well. American wood fibers eastern white pine. Supposed to be a good pellet. We will see. 5 bags or so should be good enough for a test burn.
These North Idaho burn ever so nice and clean. :fing32: Not sure if I'll find anything to top them.

MU
 

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Discussion Starter #95
Went up to Monson again today to get another 30 bags to fill closet. Now I have a few bags over 2 ton. :thThumbsU Wow what a difference loading them in the truck all spread out in bed of the Silverado. I know it was not a full ton but for sure next time will do the same. Went quick and was able to use bed cover too.
All set now for, who knows how long.:dunno:

MU
 

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Went up to Monson again today to get another 30 bags to fill closet. Now I have a few bags over 2 ton. :thThumbsU Wow what a difference loading them in the truck all spread out in bed of the Silverado. I know it was not a full ton but for sure next time will do the same. Went quick and was able to use bed cover too.
All set now for, who knows how long.:dunno:

MU
Where do you hang your scarf??:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #97
:sidelaugh
This is a storage closet more-so than for clothes. Have plenty of room elsewhere. Too much house really, but was a good deal and in way better condition than some of the dumps we looked at for way way way more money. Unbelievable what people think their junk homes are worth.:dunno:

MU
 

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Hope that closet is in basement and not on a joist supported floor. That's a fair amount of weight in a small area. Know that's not a full ton, but at 40 lbs a bag looks to be in neighborhood of 1100-1200 lbs. A lot of weight, that could in time cause problems.
MikeC
 

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Discussion Starter #99
In basement next to stove.
It is about 2 tons maybe a bit over. I had 30 bags from when I installed stove. Bought a full ton, then went and got 30 more bags the following weekend.
It's the most I'll be putting in there. May just put it all outside on porch next to sliding doors. Hope I don't get any floor damage from this. Good point.

MU
 

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So a few months in now with the wood and gas inserts. So far its awesome. Without using the furnace much, we are easily keeping the temp in the house higher than we did last year.

One thing I am surprised about is how fast the wood goes. People that burn wood told me I would fly through it, however I am still surprised. Piles I thought would last weeks goes in days. Still, I hope to have enough to get us through the winter.

The wood furnace is in the lower level. This area was almost unusable last year cuz it was so cold. Now its my go to place. Not that I ever need a break from my two daughters and wife! ;)
 
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