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Discussion Starter #1
I have the opportunity to purchase, at scrap price FOB, a rather large quantity of used, galvanized, corrugated, roofing. This metal was carefully removed from a building several years ago and stored in the open. The metal is quite old and is the heavy gauge of those years. Haven't measured it but it appears to be 18 or maybe 16 gauge. Holes from the previous use were pre-drilled and evenly spaced so re-use would be easy. It's all 12 and 24 foot sheets with the only cut to fit pieces being from the gables. I'll use the same pitch roof to facilitate saving these.

Problem with this is it will need to be painted as the galvanizing has worn thru in some spots. Maybe five to ten percent of the sheet surface on most sheets is showing a little surface rust. I thought about turning the sheets over but this would put the existing holes in the valleys of the corrugations rather than on the ridges as is needed.

Enough background. Can this stuff be painted in a manner that will give many years of service? Would it be better to apply a roof coating after it's in place? What about the walls, which will be 12' tall, what would be the best way to cover them? If painting is the answer would it be better to paint prior to putting it up or in place?

I've seen several excellent replies to painting questions here and thought I'd ask the experts.

Thanks.

Mike
 

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You can paint galvanized steel,but it must be well weathered or etched with acid like vinegar,or a special zinc rich primer...they also sell "cold galvanizing compound" in spray form that looks and protects like hot dip galvanizing,Rustoleum and CRC make it and probably other brands like Mar-Hyde..its probably not that great on rust though,it would have to be sanded off first..

You could use an aluminum roof coating used on mobile homes ,I have used it on my van's rusted roof and it lasts a lot longer than paint,and can be applied over surface rust too...it's pretty cheap too,at about 12 bucks a gallon,comes in 5 gallon pails too..
 

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Attach a wire wheel to your angle grinder to get rid of the rust, it should make short work of it.
 

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Clean it off and paint it. I am not sure about primer first, but they do make a paint just for steel roofing. Check that stuff out, you may not need to prime it, but if you do, some "rusty metal primer" on the spots needed may do the trick.
 

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could try this stuff
http://www.gemplers.com/search/rust+converter

see how it treated a rusty propane tank
some answers from thier faq...

A: Metal buildings, cars and trucks, machinery, gates, tanks and farm equipment. Rust Converter works on any rusty iron or steel object.

Q: Can Rust Converter be applied to a wood stove?
A: No. It is not considered to be heat resistant.

Q: Can Rust Converter be applied to a non-rusty surface?
A: No. Rust Converter should only be applied to the rusted areas, not the whole surface. After the Rust Converter has completely cured, it is recommended to wipe the surface with a damp cloth to remove all excess Rust Converter before you apply the oil-based paint. Rust Converter will glaze coat the non-rusted areas causing the paint not to adhere to those areas as well.

Q: Can Rust Converter be applied inside a tank?
A: Yes, as long as it is treated as the primer only. You must paint over Rust Converter with a paint that is resistant to the contents in the tank.

Q: Can Rust Converter be used on Galvanized Steel?
A: Yes, as long as there is rust present! Galvanized is defined as a piece of metal that is coated with zinc to prevent corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info, wouldn't be interested in this stuff but it's such a heavy gauge and we loose roofing to wind every year with the new lighter gauges. I talked to a local roofer and he says the sidewalls can just be turned over and put a special screw thru the existing holes in the valleys of the tin. Apparently they have a bigger washer and seal on them. He also says he's never seen a paint that will last more than a few years on the roof and recommends a roof coating. Think that's the way we'll go on this.

Mike
 
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