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Discussion Starter #1
Silly question I know.... however I broke the tires off of the wheels today and they had some fluid in them... not alot but some. They also had this really nasty red/pink slime in them... along with yellowish chunks of rubbery stuff. I'm not sure if it was years of fix a flat... some type of slime sealant.. or lord knows what. I know that the two rear wheels did not match once sanded. The one was red under the white paint.. where as the other was all white under the skin. The red wheel had some rust once I broke the tire down and could see... it also had lots of nasty gunk. The other wheel looked fairly good.

Anyways... I am going to rinse them out (tires are older Goodyear Terra Grips) and I only broke the seals off on one side. The other sides I moved the bead just slightly so that I could sand the lip of the wheel and mask it for paint. I was afraid to pull the tires completely off since it isn't in the budget to replace them yet if I damage the beads. THEY WERE REALLY GLUED ON THERE... so I was very nervous pulling them anymore than necessary.

My question is.. should I load them while the bead is broke? if so what type of filler? A friend of mine has access to lotsa antifreeze.. I assume automotive style since he works in the oil fields... however how do I plug a hole on a loaded tire? I noticed a small nail in one... and I know that it probably had more very small holes since it had the gunk in there. Or should I skip loading them and put the wheel weights back on... which I hate the look of. My other silly question is... how do you patch a loaded tire? lets say I run over something that i'm not supposed to... and the tire is loaded. How can you patch one without draining it?


Thanks for the help,,
Nick
 

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The Magnificent
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If you loaded the tire completely with slime, then you could have slime in a loaded tire.

Normally, most people use a tube, and yes you must drain the tube to fix the puncture.

You could load tubeless tires, and try to plug them from the outside, but I don't know how well that would work.
 

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If your using calcium to load your tire,you need a tube in it,the calcium will eat your rim away in short order.Even if your in a warmer climate and are just using water,I'd still use a tube.It may be ok to load a tubeless tire,if your using anti freeze in it but the slime won't work to seal it.
 

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My question is.. should I load them while the bead is broke? if so what type of filler? Thanks for the help,,Nick
They have to be loaded through the valve stem,you wouldn't be able to get enough fluid in to make it worthwhile trying to fill it while the bead is broke.Anti freeze will work,if you can get it free,you may have to strain it if it was antifreeze that was drained out of engines,calcium is cheaper if you have to buy it.Tires that are designed to be loaded have a valve stem that screws out of the tube and leaves a large opening to fill it through,actually they are made that you can fasten an adapter to it to fill it through.I've never filled tubeless tires so I don't know now if it would actually work but if your tires have nail holes in them anyway,you may as well put tubes in and if your going to all the trouble of doing it,you may as well get the tubes that are designed to be filled.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
True.. I'm still debating on loading the tires. I can't bring myself to placing the wheel weights back on after painting the rims. I also hate the look of the wheel with the weights on it. If they could mount on the inside I would just put them there... however they are huge and won't. Found out the nail wasn't all of the way through.

How much difference to the weights make, or loaded tires... when pushing dirt, snow, or tilling? Would making a weight bracket on the back work as well as wheel weights?

Thanks,
Nick
 

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Personally,I think wheel weights on a tractor add character but I understand where your coming from with freshly painted rims.Extra weight on a tractor depends a lot on what it's doing.If your pushing fluffy snow with a blade or even a snow blower,you might not need it,you might not need it with a tiller either.If your pushing dirt or or plowing with a moldboard plow,you'll need whatever you can hang on the tractor.A rear mounted weight box or bracket to hang suitcase weights on works fine and actually works better than wheel weights because of leverage but if your using a rear mounted implement,it'll be in the way.That's were wheel weights and loading the tires works best.Another thing with a small tractor is the size of the driver,if you weight 250lbs,you wouldn't need to worry as much about rear weight as a driver that only weighted 100lbs.
 

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I have windshield washer fluid in my tires. They're 26x12x12's. Lots of weight there. One tractor has agri tires on it and it doesn't get much in the way of nail holes. The other has the regular turf tires (same size tires) and it does get nails on occasion. It's no big deal to seal a puncture. Just role the hole to the top, and use the regular tire plug kit. One nice thing about the fluid in there, when there IS a hole, it's easy to see! Just look for the little fountain....
 

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