My Tractor Forum banner
  • We have a new contest celebrating your backyard. Sponsored by Walmart, its your chance to win a $400 gift just in time for the 4th of July! HERE Contest Ends on the 30th.

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I'm a new tractor owner. I bought a 52 8n, I love it. This weekend I was lifting a tree up on some braces to try out my new hewing axe, and I noticed my rear tire was low. It was flat within an hour. :banghead3

My other rear tire and rim look pretty new, and the one that went flat does not seam to bad, although the rim is rusty. The valve stem does not have a nut on that side, and I think thats where I will find my issue. Is it possible for me to break this thing down to see what the issue is, or do i have to bring it somewhere. It seams pretty rugged, any tips would be helpful. Does anyone know of anyone in my area that might be good at this sort of thing? I'm in Alton Bay NH.

Thanks for any help,
john
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Its possible to break them down yourself but I wouldn't recommend you try it solo. Your best bet would be a truck tire center or farm tire/implement dealer. Our local heavy truck tire center will break them down reasonable enough <$50. Far safer than trying it yourself without any idea what your doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,115 Posts
I would also suggest taking it to a tire shop that is equipped to do this kind of work. We've changed tires on tractors at the farm a few times and it's not a fun job. If the tire is weighted, that is has liquid or powder in it, you will need special equipment for the job.

Be very careful when taking the wheel off the tractor. Be sure to have it will cribbed with blocking and not just setting on a jack. Those tire and wheel units are heavy and it's easy to knock a tractor off a jack while moving them around. Also easy to drop the wheel and tire on yourself. The little N's are not big and the tires are small when compared to other farm tractors but I'd urge safety while doing this job.

Mike
 

·
Retired MTF Admin
Joined
·
26,564 Posts
:MTF_wel2:...

Start out by taking it to a professional, because that is where you are going to end up anyway!!

Be very careful when taking the wheel off the tractor. Be sure to have it will cribbed with blocking and not just setting on a jack. Those tire and wheel units are heavy and it's easy to knock a tractor off a jack while moving them around. Also easy to drop the wheel and tire on yourself. The little N's are not big and the tires are small when compared to other farm tractors but I'd urge safety while doing this job.
:ditto::ditto::ditto:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,674 Posts
I agree with the others, I have broke them down before and it is WORK. Take to someone and save yourself, the money spent is way better than the aggravation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Most AG tire dealers have a service truck to fix tires on-site with air and jib-booms and a guy who REALLY knows what he's doing.Give one a call and be amazed watching him fix it!!:rauch10:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,268 Posts
Unloaded rear tires with the center disc weigh about 200 lbs. Loaded you can add about another300 lbs +/-. When jacking up from the middle of the rear block up both sides because once you take the tire off the weigh will shift to the side that the tire is still on and may cause the jack to slip if only in one location. Loaded tires are worse. Jack it up until complete off the ground but not higher. You want to try to keep the studs from getting marded. Jacking up too high with loaded tires when taking them off will rake the studs. Just be careful.

Kirk
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top